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Giant Snake In The Congo


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#41 gigantor

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Posted 29 January 2012 - 12:48 AM

but Wud, what about Titanoboa? bones don't lie...

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So, once there were huge giant snakes alive. The funny thing is that it proves the climate was much warmer back then than now. So much for Al Gore and global warming alarmists claiming the world will end by a 2 degree increase in temps :lol:

Head estimated that the tropical rainforests where it lived must have had average yearly temperature of 32-33 degrees Celsius, far hotter than the equivalent temperatures for modern tropical forests. These estimates suggest that the forests of that period were experiencing greenhouse conditions. These conditions, part of the planet's history, have been written in stone, left for us to glean among the petrified bones of an ancient snake.



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#42 Halfpint

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Posted 29 January 2012 - 05:51 AM

According to the person I got it from, it was in Delray, Florida between Ft. Lauderdale and West Palm Beach.
I'm still looking for some more info since there is a question here of the history.

How strange. Given the size, I'd have assumed it must be a python (which of course now inhabit the Everglades) but the head doesn't seem to resemble a python (although the perspective isn't great). Any thoughts anyone?

Also not all pythons arent venomous.

None of the constrictors are venomous. They can't interbreed with venonous species either. What would be the point of a venomous constrictor anyway? The ability to use venom would make constriction pointless.


So, once there were huge giant snakes alive. The funny thing is that it proves the climate was much warmer back then than now. So much for Al Gore and global warming alarmists claiming the world will end by a 2 degree increase in temps :lol:
[/color] [/indent]

Snakes as reptiles are cold blooded, hence the warmer the better. Humans are warm blooded and therefore have the capability to self regulate our temperature within optimal ranges and assuming access to water etc. Gore's argument isn't that the world will end but that much of the Earth will essentially become uninhabitable and that there will be less of it (as the polar ice caps melt, low lying areas will flood).

/Off topic
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#43 wudewasa

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Posted 29 January 2012 - 07:47 AM

Gigantor,

I brought up Titanoboa on page 1 of this thread.

Titanoboa lived in South America, not Africa. Could a python species evolve and occupy a similar niche on the Dark Continent. given the right conditions? Yes, that is a possibility, but there are vertebrae that prove titanoboa existed, not just a picture with no size references. Titanoboa has vertebrae resembling an anaconda, which is largely an aquatic species. Rock pythons are tropical savanna denizens for the most part, not large aquatic constrictors, although they can be found around water. Yet water is necessary for prey items, hence the snake's haunt.

A parallel can be made with Gigantopithecus. Just because the species existed in Asia and had possible access to a land bridge to the Americas didn't mean that it set up shop here and evolved into bigfoot. No New World ape species has ever been documented either.

Tried to attach image of large snake pulling a wallaby out of the water from a cliff somewhere in Australia but didnt seem to upload so ignore this post (if you havent already) ... :unsure:


Here you go- http://www.snopes.co...snake.asp#photo
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#44 Biggie

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Posted 29 January 2012 - 11:10 AM

This was taken last week about 3 hours South of me.


Which section of what state do you live in(IE West AZ) so I can move further away from you?


JohnC, both of your photos have been shopped

True. The longest Eastern Diamondback rattlesnakes are supposed to be around 7ft max if I remember right(many adults are 6ft). Someone correct me if that's wrong.
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#45 Bucksquatch

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Posted 29 January 2012 - 12:01 PM

I just moved to Deltona,(central) Florida but will be moving shortly to Lakeland which is an hour East of Tampa.
But biggie, I think its a fake. The more I look at it, it seems the snake has a weird shine to it that kind of stands out and I've been looking online and cant find any news reports about it. I would think something like that would garner some kind of attention?
Sorry folks.
Maybe you should change the title of this thread to just "Giant Snakes"? Just a thought.
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#46 SweetSusiq

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Posted 29 January 2012 - 01:34 PM

Which section of what state do you live in(IE West AZ) so I can move further away from you?


Finally, Someone with some sense and has the courage to admit being frightened by a terrifying snake that could live in their vicinity!
I'd move also, or just never leave the house. :blush: :unsure: I'm a wee bit terrified of all snakes, and I depart hastily as soon as one is spotted :rolleyes: in a lady-like manner:Not!
Snakes are just horrific looking and scary and they bite people and pets and then they hang on to whatever they bite! :o

Edited by Biggie, 30 January 2012 - 10:08 AM.
Added missing end quote tag.

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#47 MikeG

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Posted 29 January 2012 - 02:12 PM

.......and they're far more scared of you, Suzie, than you are of them.

Fifteen years ago I drove the entire length of Africa, camping in the bush every single night for 6 months, and driving 21,000 miles in a continent which is supposed to have more snakes than anywhere. I saw 3 snakes on the entire trip, and two of those were dead. They feel the vibrations from your feet as you approach, and they clear off quick.

Mike

Edited by MikeG, 29 January 2012 - 02:12 PM.

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#48 SweetSusiq

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Posted 29 January 2012 - 03:27 PM

I must tread lightly because I've seen more snakes then I've ever wanted to see.Yikes, My now "soldier" son actually used to catch snakes and bring them home to show me. :blink: I'd smile, and say be sure to release them far away from here, okay honey?
Mike, You are so nice, I know that snakes are scared of me also, but I'm the one screaming quietly and running away in a lady-like manner of course. :unsure: :rolleyes:
We once took a turtle hit by a car to the vet. They still talk about that to me at the vets when I take our dogs there.
Edited for the fun of it...

.......and they're far more scared of you, Suzie, than you are of them.

Fifteen years ago I drove the entire length of Africa, camping in the bush every single night for 6 months, and driving 21,000 miles in a continent which is supposed to have more snakes than anywhere. I saw 3 snakes on the entire trip, and two of those were dead. They feel the vibrations from your feet as you approach, and they clear off quick.

Mike

Mike, If you can believe it, I actually reared a son who will probably do that exact same thing after he finishes his Marine 9 month training at Quanico, Va.this fall. He was going to Alaska alone backpacking this winter but I raised such a fuss he is now talking about Africa. :blob: I sorta give up, he goes from dangerous to really dangerous stunts. Did I mention the backpacking in Alaska was alone and **Unarmed**? :rolleyes:

Edited by SweetSusiq, 29 January 2012 - 03:42 PM.

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#49 Encounter

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Posted 29 January 2012 - 04:13 PM

Sweetsusiq says:
Finally, Someone with some sense and has the courage to admit being frightened by a terrifying snake that could live in their vicinity!
I'd move also, or just never leave the house. :blush: :unsure: I'm a wee bit terrified of all snakes, and I depart hastily as soon as one is spotted :rolleyes: in a lady-like manner:Not!
Snakes are just horrific looking and scary and they bite people and pets and then they hang on to whatever they bite! :o


Susie, next time you see one just take a moment to see the snakes beauty (unless you have your foot on it in which case take a moment to remember your first aid which you will likely need after it strikes you) - really they are beautiful! Australian farmers used to kill heaps of them and hang them on fences though Im not sure if they really thought other snakes would take this as a warning. The common brown snake here is indeed common and is the second most poisonous snake in the world, I think the Australian Taipan is the first most poisonous. You do see snakes here but Mike is right they dont want to be tackling a human. People clumsily walk through the bush and step on them which is when people get struck, and occasionally browns will be aggressive in bearing season, I knew a guy who was chased by a brown till it caught up and struck him. This is rare though. I used to read a book in my back yard on a dairy farm where a red belly black snake (many times more poisonous than the cobra but fairly nice and unagressie) would pass on the same route to a water course each day. I got used to just sitting as it slithered about three feet away from me. I got to know its immense beauty. Once you find beauty in something you loose fear while keeping respect and a world opens up for you.



...My now "soldier" son actually used to catch snakes and bring them home to show me. :blink: I'd smile, and say be sure to release them far away from here, okay honey?
Mike, You are so nice, I know that snakes are scared of me also, but I'm the one screaming quietly and running away in a lady-like manner of course. :unsure: :rolleyes:
We once took a turtle hit by a car to the vet. They still talk about that to me at the vets when I take our dogs there.
Edited for the fun of it...


Mike, If you can believe it, I actually reared a son who will probably do that exact same thing after he finishes his Marine 9 month training at Quanico, Va.this fall. He was going to Alaska alone backpacking this winter but I raised such a fuss he is now talking about Africa. :blob: I sorta give up, he goes from dangerous to really dangerous stunts. Did I mention the backpacking in Alaska was alone and **Unarmed**? :rolleyes:


Sad about releasing the snake far away as they are territorial and posibly will die just dumped in other snakes territories. Didnt get the turtle thing - did you mean people dont take turtles hit by cars to the vet there? While oddly this year there have been a lack of turtles or snakes on the road (hope they are not going the way of the bee) in the past few years in the snowy mountains here Ive spent heaps of time getting turtles to vets or checking the way they are walking and carrying them off the highway to the water course they were moving toward. You dont do that in the USA normally?

Just on your sons adventure, sounds brilliant! I would have thought it would be much safer for him in Alaska than Africa with the so many wars going on there and other massive problems. We dont have big bears in Australia so Im not sure the actual likelihood in Alaska that your son would be dealing with bears but Im sure he would have less likelihood of bear problem than extremely dangerous human created situations in Africa!
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#50 MikeG

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 06:50 AM

Just on your sons adventure, sounds brilliant! I would have thought it would be much safer for him in Alaska than Africa with the so many wars going on there and other massive problems. We dont have big bears in Australia so Im not sure the actual likelihood in Alaska that your son would be dealing with bears but Im sure he would have less likelihood of bear problem than extremely dangerous human created situations in Africa!


Oh dear...........how wrong can you be?

I lived in Australia for 10 years, and have visited countless times since, including driving around in the remotest parts of the outback, and way up north (Kimberlies, Bungle Bungles etc......), and can tell you that travelling in Australia is many, many times more dangerous than travelling in Africa. If something goes wrong when you're out on, say the Tanami track, or the Strzelecki track, or on your way up to Cape York, you're on your own. Nobody is going to come to help you........you're getting yourself out or you're toast. In Africa, the place is crammed full of the friendliest, happiest most helpful people on the planet, and you will be helped.

What wars are you talking about in Africa? I would avoid the border between the two Sudans, CAR, Northern DRC, Somalia and adjacent borders, the coast of Libya, and the northern Sahel. Travellers don't tend to go anywhere near these places anyway.

My 23 year old daughter has just come back from having the time of her life alone in Africa for 10 months, and other than her getting to the aeroplane in Jo'berg, we never worried about her for a minute. Don't believe nonsensical old sterotypes!!

Mike

Weren't we talking about snakes?

Edited by MikeG, 30 January 2012 - 06:52 AM.

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#51 Halfpint

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 09:33 AM

Weren't we talking about snakes?


So dragging this thread kicking and screaming back on topic...I do wonder whether the Congo could provide optimal conditions for a snake to attain a very large size (for the sake of argument, over 40" to be regarded as 'giant' - given that modern constrictors can reach sizes of 35"). Vast tracts of the Congo are uninhabited let alone unexplored and the river itself is the deepest in the world (I think), so providing plenty of opportunity for a large snake to move about without having to worry too much about the effects of gravity.

Given the latest account, I do wonder if more will emerge on this encounter. I imagine it's conceivable that the size of the snake was exaggerated but if he had to fend it off with his paddle, that doesn't imply it was a tiddler and possibly suggests it saw him as a potential meal! For a snake to see a human as a potential meal (as opposed to threat), it would have to be very large indeed!
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#52 Encounter

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 01:28 PM

I must tread lightly because I've seen more snakes then I've ever wanted to see.Yikes, My now "soldier" son actually used to catch snakes and bring them home to show me. :blink: I'd smile, and say be sure to release them far away from here, okay honey?
...
Mike, If you can believe it, I actually reared a son who will probably do that exact same thing after he finishes his Marine 9 month training at Quanico, Va.this fall. He was going to Alaska alone backpacking this winter but I raised such a fuss he is now talking about Africa. :blob: I sorta give up, he goes from dangerous to really dangerous stunts. Did I mention the backpacking in Alaska was alone and **Unarmed**? :rolleyes:



Oh dear...........how wrong can you be?

I lived in Australia for 10 years, and have visited countless times since, including driving around in the remotest parts of the outback, and way up north (Kimberlies, Bungle Bungles etc......), and can tell you that travelling in Australia is many, many times more dangerous than travelling in Africa. If something goes wrong when you're out on, say the Tanami track, or the Strzelecki track, or on your way up to Cape York, you're on your own. Nobody is going to come to help you........you're getting yourself out or you're toast. In Africa, the place is crammed full of the friendliest, happiest most helpful people on the planet, and you will be helped.

What wars are you talking about in Africa? I would avoid the border between the two Sudans, CAR, Northern DRC, Somalia and adjacent borders, the coast of Libya, and the northern Sahel. Travellers don't tend to go anywhere near these places anyway.

My 23 year old daughter has just come back from having the time of her life alone in Africa for 10 months, and other than her getting to the aeroplane in Jo'berg, we never worried about her for a minute. Don't believe nonsensical old sterotypes!!

Mike

Weren't we talking about snakes?


Re "Oh dear.......how wrong can you be?" - maybe you can say this after a little introspection (to yourself Mike). I responded to SweetSusiq who had said she didnt want her son going to Alaska so now he is going to Africa. I was pointing out that wars can be more a danger than bears. Alaska Mike, NOT Australia. Please read posts correctly before Oh Dearing people. How can you even begin to see the word "Australia" when it says "Alaska"?

As to your oh so scary adventures in Australia, please remember that I have lived here for over fourty years in rough bush and deserts and have possibly traveled much more of it. I grew up with Funnel Web spiders walking past me as I watched TV have been struck by a common brown and once went to a hospital after swimming in a river thinking I might have been bitten at home by a spider to find I had Tiger Snake poison in me (another snake many more times poisonous than the Indian Cobra). Still Australia is a very safe country to roam about. Not far from where I lived in Western Australia in the desert an man and I believe nephew walked away from thier car which had broken down and died quickly in the heat. I lived at one point where desert meets ocean near the Ningaloo Reef and had a spear fisher come up to use the phone, he had a spear head in his wrist he had bandaged incorrectly and his fingers were beginning to go cold , the flying doctor wouldnt come there to get him so he had to be driven the two hundred kilometres over mostly unsealed desert roads to a town. So yes I know there are some things to watch for in Australia but in fact I think it is a very safe country. There are no international borders here and besides a few backpacker murderers there is no violence to worry about.

Yes we were on the topic of snakes and I have posted a few times in this thread about snakes - but if you will read properly next time, as to adventuring in Alaska or Africa I was responding to SweetSusiq. This was particularly focused on SweetSusiqs comments about wildlife in general.

Edited by Encounter, 30 January 2012 - 01:51 PM.

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#53 Halfpint

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 02:48 PM

Not exactly related but still interesting.

Edited by Halfpint, 30 January 2012 - 02:48 PM.

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#54 VAfooter

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 04:27 PM

Not exactly related but still interesting.



Unfortunately for the most part, these foreign species have no natural preditors to keep their numbers down. As a result as indicated in the story, native species get wiped out. The effect on the ecosystems cannot be overstated. Very bad situation for South Florida. Same thing happened on Guam with the Brown Tree Snake. The native bird, lizard, and bat populations were greatly affected by this. People who release their pets in the wild, should be punished very harshly. But it is very hard to document and prove that they did.


Effects of the Brown Tree Snake:

http://www.fort.usgs.../education/bts/

Edited by VAfooter, 30 January 2012 - 04:29 PM.

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#55 Strick

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 04:57 PM

Didnt get the turtle thing - did you mean people dont take turtles hit by cars to the vet there? While oddly this year there have been a lack of turtles or snakes on the road (hope they are not going the way of the bee) in the past few years in the snowy mountains here Ive spent heaps of time getting turtles to vets or checking the way they are walking and carrying them off the highway to the water course they were moving toward. You dont do that in the USA normally?


I think making soup is the standard practice when encountering a Turtle on the road in Suzi's neck of the woods....or so I'm reliably informed! :rolleyes:
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#56 Encounter

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 06:15 PM

Unfortunately for the most part, these foreign species have no natural preditors to keep their numbers down. As a result as indicated in the story, native species get wiped out. The effect on the ecosystems cannot be overstated. Very bad situation for South Florida. Same thing happened on Guam with the Brown Tree Snake. The native bird, lizard, and bat populations were greatly affected by this. People who release their pets in the wild, should be punished very harshly. But it is very hard to document and prove that they did.


Effects of the Brown Tree Snake:

http://www.fort.usgs.../education/bts/


Yes the brown tree snake is the dolls eye python, an Australian native I spoke of above which is venomous (though not really dangerously so for humans). It is the one which was transported to Guam.

I think making soup is the standard practice when encountering a Turtle on the road in Suzi's neck of the woods....or so I'm reliably informed! :rolleyes:


LOL, :D Waiting for a bite... :unsure:
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#57 Tarfoot96

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Posted 25 March 2012 - 10:13 AM

I don't know about the 1959 account;it seems believable to me,but really you never can be sure.Either way,there have been a lot of giant snake sightings in the area,and if there is anywhere where a huge snake could live unnoticed,that is the place.Also remember that there have been several confirmed 30 foot snakes,so a 40 or 50 foot long snake is really not that big of a stretch.
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#58 jon larsen

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 03:17 PM

Algot Lange, in Adventures in Remote Parts of the Upper Amazon, told about 2 Anacondas. The first was killed by rubber workers and was 52 ft. 8 in. in length. The second, which he shot along with others was 56 ft 0 in. in length before skinning. The dried skin was 54 ft. 8 in. in length and 5 ft. 1in. in width layed out flat. The snake had been split open along the backbone to skin it. The date.......29 July 1910.
If you'd like a copy of this interesting book: sales@nuvisionpublications.com ISBN# 1-59547-870-1.
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#59 Colossus

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 04:35 PM

I've always been interested in that photo from the Belgium pilot. Never really heard much about it. Not outside of the Mysterious World interview from when I was a kid.

On a side note I fine the indiscriminate killing of snakes, well any animal for that matter, detestable. I've swerved my Camaro on old back roads going at a decent clip to avoid snakes in the road.
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#60 BCCryptid

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 12:50 PM

The old photo is interesting, but there was never any way to verify the size in the photo, to my knowledge. The story behind it does sound true though, and such creatures only recently went extinct and are present in the fossil record. There were ocean-going versions too, btw...

As for anacondas, Florida will soon be the place. Idiots have released pet anacondas into the Florida everglades, and they are breeding like wildfire, with no natural predators to stop them. They will likely kill off everything in there, and may grow to sizes not seen in Africa due to the abundance of food and lack of predators. They are a truly monstrous invasive species!
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