Northern Lights

Minnesota Howls-23 Minutes

141 posts in this topic

Hello all-

I would like to encourage you to listen to some very impressive audio taken in northern Minnesota earlier this year. The website that is hosting the file is brand new and just went live this morning. It is called the Sasquatch Researchers Association or SRA and was started by former BFRO investigators wanting to share with the rest of the community their experiences without restrictions. I just happen to be part of the group, so that is why you are literally the first to know about it.

Please feel free to share this link with anyone you feel would enjoy listening to it. I would suggest reading the background and the analysis done by the SRA team. It is impressive. I will be around to answer questions if you have any. Thanks and enjoy.

NL

http://sasquatchresearchers.org/march-2012-minnesota-howls/

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Very Dynamic...........Wow! I can pick out some coyotes, some wolves and lots of unknown! :thumbsup: The clatter at 16:30 seems somewhat mechanical though. A great catch and good job. :)

17:45-18:24 are AMAZING! I've never heard that in the wild.

Edited by thermalman
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It always seems to be " former BFRO....... " these days.

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^I can't take credit for this, but someone said the BFRO is like high school. Everyone goes there and eventually graduates to something better.

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Great listening ! It seems to start out, canine.. although I have no experience hearing wolves in the field. The most interesting segment for me.. is from around 14 to 19 minutes. The rapid knocks or slaps.. is very much like what I recorded and heard, one night in the field. The louder howls in this part of the recording, are certainly not canine.

Do you (Northern Lights) think the audio started out wolves, and then the subjects took over and silenced (or interacted with) the wolves.. or do you think it is all the subjects (loudest howls) in the audio ? If so, they can sure do a great wolf howl (comparing them to recorded wolf howls) .

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Very well done with great explanations, some of the best presented work I’ve listened to.

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The fun and frustrating thing about audio files is unless there is video, it's all a matter of opinion. Andy did the write up on the analysis and is saying canine could be heard, but I've heard lots of wolves and coyotes while out and these recordings don't sound like any that I've ever heard.

My favorite part is at the end of the 8:30 to 12 minute section.

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The fun and frustrating thing about audio files is unless there is video, it's all a matter of opinion.

Indeed.

My favorite part is at the end of the 8:30 to 12 minute section.

Yes, that's where there are also several vocals (last two), I would consider non canine. The rising and falling (wooo) vocal, is very unique.

Edited by imonacan
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Must be something about train whistles that get things howling

There's a thread about bigfoot and trains. I've camped near railroad tracks before, and it does get pretty intense when they go by... with the rumble of the engines followed by several minutes of screeching wheels on the tracks. Enough to cause my hair to stand up. Dogs often bark when trains are going by, so it wouldn't surprise me if there was a connection between trains and general animal behavior.

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The only debunk I could think of is this. I know dogs love to sing in unison with sirens, trains. These seem to do the same, and one is keyed by another. The shopping cart in Walmart sound is odd, dragging a cart with a bad wheel on the pavement. The smacking sounds are dogs running around in hard snow, as you can hear one whimper during. IMO 90% Wolves with the 10% tree knocks or branches breaking from snow.

Otherwise, I agree with the analysis.

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I just confirmed, there were no other dogs on the private property nor in the proximity to the recorder. There were no tracks around the recorder except for Mike and the snow was melting, so it wasn't hard packed.

Please let me know if there any other questions. Thanks

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at first it sounded like a wolf...but no. Siren calls, too. I don't recall hearing those before. thanks!

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The howls sound canine to me.

I guess I don't understand why folks don't allow for variability in wolf/coyote vocalization. Sometimes a wolf will sound deeper than usual, more guttural than usual, etc. Sometimes a coyote will sound very "primate"y to our ears. I've got a dog who barks with a really hoarse, scratchy, shallow sound, but when we get her ready for bed with a last treat for the night she gets very excited and gives very deep "rrrooooo" sounds. That's the same individual in the same place (my living room) making markedly different calls. Imagine how much more variability there might be in different members of a pack of wolves (or from different packs) calling according to their many and varied different motivations, under different atmospheric conditions, in varied terrain, at different distances from the recorder, etc.

As for the "slapping" sounds around 16 minutes, they sound like one or more canids trotting around through leaf litter or crusty snow. I'm pretty sure you can hear a quick canine whine around 16:40 or so.

Very cool recording, but I don't hear anything I wouldn't be able to attribute to known wildlife in the area.

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I would agree that this recording could be from known animals. As I said before, without actually seeing what was making the sounds, it's entirely possible. I think they are compelling because they don't sound like any previous recording or personal encounters that I've experienced before.

I'm not an expert and don't claim to be Survivorman, but I've spent a fair amount of time in the woods in northern Minnesota and have only heard something similar to this once very briefly and I'm confident it wasn't canine.

Interesting, yes.

Cool, yes.

Definitive, no.

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