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The Upside Down Tree

67 posts in this topic

Recently there was a BFRO report where the Reporting Party observed and photographed a good sized tree shoved a couple feet into the ground with the roots straight up. This was discovered in the immediate area of his incident, where he heard what sounded like a large predator running down and killing a deer over several hundred yards in thick cover. The photo he took of this tree shoved/planted upside down in the ground is really creepy to me. It is so visually striking, like the monkee is saying he's the boss hog in the area.

A couple nights back I was watching a show about unknown critters in Alaska. Much of the show was devoted to the possibility of monkees in SE Alaska. One of the witnesses who grew up & resides on one the islands off Alaska or Canada told of how his father told him when out hunting to be careful of the gorillas on the nearby mountain. He said they knew they were in one's area by the trees shoved upside down in the ground. They may have even showed one or two if I recall.

I have seen & photographed bows, Xs, and teepees which I suspect were related to monkees, but have never seen a tree shoved upside down in the ground. Still when you think about it, what more obvious & visually striking display of strength & territorial possession could there be?

So my question is has anyone here seen an upside down tree marker, and was it in/close to a monkee related event or suspected area?

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I've seen numerous tree tops shoved into the ground over the years. No roots were present however, which is an important difference here and I would be interested in see photos of it and the surrounding terrain. Upon closer examination of the tops I've found, a plausible explanation of what transpired quickly becomes evident. The tops clearly broke out of an adjacent snag, where they simply tip over, fall to earth, and then spear themselves into the ground below. Gravity and aerodynamics were their helpers. No real mystery there but quite a sight.

As for trees in this position that have roots still attached, yeah this would be interesting and not so easily explained as above. If there was an adjacent cliff however, well the same natural forces could easily have been the cause. Hence the desire to see photos. If its on relatively flat terrain, yeah that's a mystery worth pursuing further and may be tied to our friend.

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(edited- question to be sent via PM as not to derail post)

Oh, and as a "marker", you can be **** certain that if I came across a ripped up tree stump rammed into the ground upside down- I'd be reconsidering feeling "protected" with even a .45 that goes in my backpack/on belt (depending where i am).

Art

Edited by Art1972
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This is the Report from just South of Aberdeen, WA ( RIP Cobain ) on the Olympic Penisula right ??

If so, i know a Researcher who went out there not connected to the BFRO who seemed to think that the Tree in question was made by a Work Team of some kind & heavy Equipment, i can't remember precisely what it was but i'll check..

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This is the Report from just South of Aberdeen, WA ( RIP Cobain ) on the Olympic Penisula right ??

If so, i know a Researcher who went out there not connected to the BFRO who seemed to think that the Tree in question was made by a Work Team of some kind & heavy Equipment, i can't remember precisely what it was but i'll check..

A link to the report by anyone would be great.

As for the heavy equipment cause. YEAH, wen I was with the forest service, I think working on a stream enhancement project, one of the excavator operators did just that with a small tree. He was just messing around. I imagine it happens more then we think. Again, photographs needed.

As for the tops I mentioned that I've come across. The trees in the PNW can be 100-300 feet tall. So some of those tops were 10' up to 30' long. I imagine they get bigger that that.

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Sorry Guys, here it is..

http://www.bfro.net/GDB/show_report.asp?id=28532

Here is another look at the Location in relation to the 101..

post-136-002290400 1301498935_thumb.jpg

Edit : Aberdeen ot the North & Raymond to the South, you can see the Pcific County Line at the bottom of the above JPG

Edited by BobbyO
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After seeing just the one photo of the tree and surroundings, I'd say that a creative excavator operator is exactly what created it. No mystery here. There is even a small slash pile there in the foreground. This is just one more case of bfro wanting a natural phenomenon to be sign of bigfoot. Happens all too often unfortunately and I've got a growing list of this taking place.

As for a report statement that a cougar wouldn't make much noise chasing down a deer. Ha! A few years ago I had a big cat bust open on a small herd of deer in NE Oregon just 100 feet from me. Yeah you could hear the deer running every which way, but you could also follow by sound the cat chasing the single deer. When the chase is on, they don't care how much noise is being made. You could even hear nails digging into wood stumps.

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We don't have trees in ND, other than the ones planted in yards or as windbreaks around farmsteads, so I know nothing about them. :D My time fiddling around in the PNW is minimal, only a few weeks and as such I know nothing of logging & logging equipment, so I'll have to defer to those that do.

Like most things possibly monkee related, a person has to sort through the jokers, hoaxsters, and honest misidentification chaff to reach the wheat of those things that may point to a big ol' smelly booger being the suspect or culprit...

Edited by NDT
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I should have said "This is just one more case of bfro wanting a natural, or man-made, phenomenon or objects to be sign of bigfoot."

Oh and if anyone is wondering, the Mountain Lion didn't catch up to the deer in my situation. It was dusk when it happened, so I wasn't going to follow it then, but the next morning I followed the tracks to where they eventually split up. This was during an elk hunt.

Unfortunately, what I am repeatedly finding with respect to natural or man-made sign being misinterpreted is that often times it is being done by those who really don't have that much practical outdoor experience. Its nothing to be ashamed of and I don't intend to discount the researcher's abilities, but like anything it requires years of experience to become adept in the woods and not be surprised by unusual sign. Being a naturalist gives a person an eye that the occasional visitor just doesn't have. We were all greenies at some time, but some remain green if their outdoor experience is limited to the occasional camping & hiking trip. On the other hand, some become very attuned to nature and develop a goal of building upon that. If the researcher were simply someone who regularly worked around loggers or equipment operators, he would have recognized the upside down tree for what it was.

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Okay NDT, I've seen naturally grown trees in North Dakota last time through. I bet you've seen one too if you think about it, you just didn't know it. Think. I bet you'll remember one. tongue.gif

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Maybe I exaggerate a little, PT...

OK, so what about the AK situation. The upside down tree bit was reportedly handed down over generations. If the guy they talked to wasn't making up a story for the gullible Wasi'chu, then generations having encountered this in that area needs another explanation. In all my decades of hunting & crawling around in the bush it's nothing I've seen, and no easy explanation comes readily to mind...

Edited by NDT
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Oh I knew you were half joking there NDT as am I.

Now what about the AK situation? Sorry, I don't follow all the reports. Got a link again?

And not saying that bigfoot 'won't' shove a tree in the ground, I'm fairly certain they do that with branches. Just that many of them may have a rational explanation first.

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Just viewing the pictures alone I see nothing to show it was man-made.

No visible tractor wear, no marks on the log showing new scuff marks that would be left by a chain.

Would have to leave it to whom ever was at the location to make the best determination and report.

No tire tracks, no tread marks by a tracked vehicle.

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Wheellug, that unit is a good 7+ years old. There's not going to be any fresh tractor marks anywhere. Wouldn't expect it, so even the researcher's observations on that won't be much help. I planted trees as well when I first moved to Oregon. You carry a pack on your back loaded down with little 6-8" plugs. The young trees you see there in that photo with the people are about 5-8 years old estimating their size and growth rate of Douglas Fir here in the PNW. Therefore the unit was probably logged at least a year before that.

Not sure how you could tell from the photo if there were marks on the tree either. Why would you expect a chain? There would be no use of any chain in logging operations. Chokers maybe. But in this case, all the operator did was grab it by the root and push down. Again if the researcher had no experience with logging operations he wouldn't have any idea what to look for. And if he's looking for evidence of equipment tracks as the basis for his conclusion, then he obviously wouldn't have applied knowledge given how long ago as that unit was cut.

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Got myself interested enough to youtube that show (it was late & I was about asleep when I watched it). It was on Discovery and was called Monster And Mysteries In Alaska. This link is has the portion showing the upside down trees and has the tlingit elder showing them an academic from AK. I don't think the guy qualified as a gullible Wasi'chu (Ive been called that so many times over my career I've thought of changing my internet handle to Wasi'chu), he was an Alaskan and the Tlingit elder treated him with respect. He explains why logging or machinery is ruled out.

Looking at them sends that familiar little electric shock through me, they look exactly like the photo on the BFRO report, but were supposed to have put there in the 40's. That is a long time & distance between virtually identical events.

if a monkee did this, I surely wouldn't want to have him crawling up at night,close enough to smell what I had for dinner.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HQsOv3AwjV0

Edited by NDT
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