BC witness

Field Trips

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My wife and I went up to the top Of Marys Peak just west of Corvallis Oregon yesterday. Looked for tracks, the only tracks found were some bird tracks, human foot prints and mt bike tracks. Was beautiful first nice no rain day in a long time, there was fresh snow about 500 ft below the top. It was 36 degree and the snow was melting fat off the trees, captured this shot and a few others, beautiful ! Lots of mt bikers found out later there was an mt bike event called mudslingers. Great day but no signs of the big guy. 

20170415_112404.jpg

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It was a beautiful day yesterday and one of the warmer ones as of late. Wish I could have gotten out but chores got in the way. Thanks for sharing Dave. Great picture of the snow and the view. I noticed there was still fresh snow in the hills east of Vancouver WA yesterday. The day made up for the hail storms we had the day before. 

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Beautiful country.  Your wife going along ... that put a smile on my face.  "That's a thing."   Thanks much for sharing the pictures.

 

MIB

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Thanks BC, looks like the weather was good for you too. I like the Buddha, nice shrine out in the woods. I wonder what Bigfoot would think? 

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"5 hours on the rough Chehalis Lake logging road, where we went 35 km "

 

Sounds like pretty slow going, averaging 7 Kpm.  This one sounds a lot rougher than many BC Forestry Service roads I have been on. Is it maintained by the government, or the logging company?

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BC great that your wife wanted to go along.      The reports of BF being sensitive about and even showing themselves to people with handicaps sure makes me think they are not only sentient but perhaps better than some humans about that sort of thing.    We are down right a mean race of beings for the most part.   

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Mike, that's 35 km each way, so a little faster, maybe 15km/hr, with stops along the way to check things out, take pics, biffy breaks for my wife (quite a production to get into the FS outhouse in a wheelchair!!!), so a very leisurely pace, for sure. The first half of the road is currently active logging, so probably maintained by the logging company, hence the locked gate at the Statlu Creek entry point, and the rest of the road to the campsite would be maintained by the FS Parks people, I think.

 

SWWASAS, I haven't read any reports about Sas/Bigfoot sensitivity to disabled persons, but there are a lot of reports that I've not gotten to reading yet. Yes, we can be mean S.O.B.s at times, wish it wasn't so.

 

Dave, the Buddha was new to me, about 5km off pavement, and must have been built in the last 3 or 4 years, since I was last up this road system. My sweety used to spend a lot of time in the shotgun seat on my outings, but in the last few years, often declines due to constant pain.

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Awesome photos guys! I plussed you both!

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Since my last post a month ago, our group has made a day trip every weekend, trying to get to some remote valleys, but found our route blocked by snow still lingering in the high passes. This weekend is a holiday in Canada (Victoria Day on Mon.), and Thomas and I were invited to join 3 of the 4 witnesses from the Jan. 28th sighting near Harrison to examine the hillside where it occurred in further detail, including a night visit with FLIR. Of course we jumped at the chance to use some high end gear, and hear their sighting story again while on the location. We met them for lunch at the Sasquatch Inn on Hwy 7, then convoyed to the site near Harrison. We spent a couple of hours hiking the hillside, looking for any remaining evidence in the very mossy, leaf littered terrain. Winona, the native lady with amazing tracking skills, found a number of large impressions in the forest duff, of appropriate size, spacing, and general shape, but the ground cover couldn't allow any fine detail, such as toe marks, so inconclusive at best. We then proceeded to a favorite mountainside lookout of Thomas and I, well off the main forestry road, which was quite busy with weekend campers, and found peace and quiet for the remainder of the afternoon and evening. With camp chairs circled, our WA. guest, Dave, gave us some lessons in operating his FLIR equipment, and we all compared our field experiences while enjoying Winona's fresh made sandwiches and some cold drinks. Shortly after that evening snack, Thomas had to leave to get to his night shift job, so he missed out on the actual after dark FLIR use.

 

As the sun set, the temperature dropped quickly, so jackets were donned, and the FLIRs fired up again to scan the extensive older clear cuts nearby, with no luck in spotting any large living creatures. After an hour of scanning the area, we convoyed back to the original sighting spot, and spent another hour scanning that hillside, while listening to what sounded like a barred owl conference going on in the treed slope to our rear. I left their company at about midnight to get home to my bed for a good night's sleep in preperation for another investigation with Thomas of a report of trees very recently pulled down, not cut down, across a hiking trail near Stave Lake, in the District of Mission. 

 

I met Thomas at his home in Mission at 11AM today, allowing him a few hours of beauty sleep after his night job, only to hear that the sighting reporter had postponed meeting us till 2PM, so we waited till 1, then headed out to meet him at the trailhead that he had described. He arrived on time, with his 2 huge dogs, a Rottwieler/Lab cross and an even bigger Great Pyrenes, both very friendly, and very eager to hit the trail. We set of up the trail and soon came to the first of many small groups of from 3 to 5 trees down across the trail , from both sides. These were 6 to 8 inch diameter young fir and hemlock, with the root balls folded up out of the ground, but not completely uprooted. After seeing a half dozen similar sites along about a mile of trail, Thomas and I both came to the conclusion that these were the result of micro-burst wind events that would have occurred during some thunderstorms that passed through the area about 3 weeks ago. There was nothing at all to indicate that they would have been caused by any deliberate action, by bipeds of either the Sasquatch or human variety.IMG_0450.JPGIMG_0451.JPGIMG_0448.JPGIMG_0414.JPG

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Captions foe the above pics: 1 and 2are the blowdowns on the Mission hiking trail, 3 is the road to our peaceful lookout, and 4 is the view from that lookout.

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