norseman

John Mionczynski

60 posts in this topic

Yes and not just because he's a bio but because of the sort of individual he is.  I've always liked and admired John.  In my opinion the only thing that could have contributed to his tent experience that wasn't a bf would be a person acting like a bf.  One of the very few individuals who convince me there could in fact be a bf animal.

 

t.

Edited by Terry
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Well Norse over in the PGF crowd I was chastised for being able to remember the details of my seeing the PGF on a big screen in a movie theater in 1973.  Now I hate to say it but we either dismiss old memories of encounters and media events or we accept them as valid.  

 

He's a self taught "character" the article says.  He's about my age and I was in my very early 20's as likely was he.  In my early 20's I was far more pliable to be able to attach mystery to the non mysterious.  I would say his credibility is as good as the next person's.  He's a romantic, he named his reconstructed motorcycle, I've named my restored Jaguar and I build guitars.  I know all about meticulous details.  I've seen John Monczynski on more than one bigfoot presentation.  Strikes me as a dreamer and this far down the road it's all a dream.

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Hello All,

I almost hate to say it but I've noticed recently thet the "don't existers" are sneaking out of their own thread back onto these kinds of threads. Well, that didn't take long. But since it's not my thread I'll leave it to the OP to do battle with them.

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Well a couple of things.

1) Using a term like denialist seems to be needlessly confrontational.

3) Describing the guy as a biologist is a big stretch, huge. The guy has a bachelors degreee in biology but isn't a biologist per say. Rather, as Meldrum's book describes him, he's a "naturalist". He's also described in other links as a naturalist or an outfitter, or wildlife consultant and lastly as a wildlife technician. He worked for fish and game twice in the 70's;  tracking radio collared sheep in one instance and with a team trapping bears in Yellowstone (his work with the team isn't described). I did a google scholar search for scientific papers and found one of the soil studies the linked article mentions, I didn't run across the others from the dates mentioned. I see nothing that would indicate expertise in zoology,primatology, anthropology, etc. If you are using an argument from authority this probably shouldn't be the guy.

He seems like an extremely interesting guy and he's probably a great outfitter and his real claim seems to be the goat packing business he started.

Is he credible? No more so than anyone else with a story and no testable evidence. As you know, stories are just that.

My questions to you Norseman are these:
Is this guy more credible to you and why/why not?
How are your ribs healing up?

Edited by Bodhi
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No more credible than any other person trying to rationalize an unusual experience, by saying 'Bigfoot did it'.

 

Biologists have as much right to be wrong about something as anyone else.

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Well a couple of things.

1) Using a term like denialist seems to be needlessly confrontational.

3) Describing the guy as a biologist is a big stretch, huge. The guy has a bachelors degreee in biology but isn't a biologist per say. Rather, as Meldrum's book describes him, he's a "naturalist". He's also described in other links as a naturalist or an outfitter, or wildlife consultant and lastly as a wildlife technician. He worked for fish and game twice in the 70's;  tracking radio collared sheep in one instance and with a team trapping bears in Yellowstone (his work with the team isn't described). I did a google scholar search for scientific papers and found one of the soil studies the linked article mentions, I didn't run across the others from the dates mentioned. I see nothing that would indicate expertise in zoology,primatology, anthropology, etc. If you are using an argument from authority this probably shouldn't be the guy.

He seems like an extremely interesting guy and he's probably a great outfitter and his real claim seems to be the goat packing business he started.

Is he credible? No more so than anyone else with a story and no testable evidence. As you know, stories are just that.

My questions to you Norseman are these:

Is this guy more credible to you and why/why not?

How are your ribs healing up?

http://www.bigfootbuzz.net/exclusive-dr-john-mionczynski-sasquatch-prey-species-anomalies/

He is addressed as Dr. and describes himself as a field Biologist. He also seems to be fairly important in wild sheep circles as well. He weighed in on the pack Goat ban on the Shoshone national forest. So no I dont consider it a stretch for him to call himself a Biologist.

Ribs are healing well, thank you.

No more credible than any other person trying to rationalize an unusual experience, by saying 'Bigfoot did it'.

 

Biologists have as much right to be wrong about something as anyone else.

OK, so what has a hand and throws pine cones in the Wind River range?

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He talked about his encounter in detail on an episode of the Bigfoot Tonight radio show. The overall impression I got was that he wasn't misidentifying anything. 

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Hello Bohdi,

 

 

Well a couple of things.

1) Using a term like denialist seems to be needlessly confrontational.

3) Describing the guy as a biologist is a big stretch, huge. The guy has a bachelors degreee in biology but isn't a biologist per say. Rather, as Meldrum's book describes him, he's a "naturalist". He's also described in other links as a naturalist or an outfitter, or wildlife consultant and lastly as a wildlife technician. He worked for fish and game twice in the 70's;  tracking radio collared sheep in one instance and with a team trapping bears in Yellowstone (his work with the team isn't described). I did a google scholar search for scientific papers and found one of the soil studies the linked article mentions, I didn't run across the others from the dates mentioned. I see nothing that would indicate expertise in zoology,primatology, anthropology, etc. If you are using an argument from authority this probably shouldn't be the guy.

 

I have to agree with all 3 of your points. Respected as a person who is after Sasquatch in the field he's probably better qualified than most but the fact doesn't automatically confer any professional credentials.

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Well Norse over in the PGF crowd I was chastised for being able to remember the details of my seeing the PGF on a big screen in a movie theater in 1973.  Now I hate to say it but we either dismiss old memories of encounters and media events or we accept them as valid.  

 

He's a self taught "character" the article says.  He's about my age and I was in my very early 20's as likely was he.  In my early 20's I was far more pliable to be able to attach mystery to the non mysterious.  I would say his credibility is as good as the next person's.  He's a romantic, he named his reconstructed motorcycle, I've named my restored Jaguar and I build guitars.  I know all about meticulous details.  I've seen John Monczynski on more than one bigfoot presentation.  Strikes me as a dreamer and this far down the road it's all a dream.

That would have been close to when they went extinct though Crow like you think they did, wouldn't it ? ;)

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The guy seems credible to me.  I hadn't read about the spinal fractures in kills before.

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No more credible than any other person trying to rationalize an unusual experience, by saying 'Bigfoot did it'.

 

Biologists have as much right to be wrong about something as anyone else.

OK, so what has a hand and throws pine cones in the Wind River range?

 

 

A. People can tell stories about things throwing pine cones.  Or, mistakenly assume something is throwing a pine cone that is blowing in the wind.

B. Squirrels have hands, and have been known to throw PCs

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I've thrown PC's too.  Hve they been known to throw Mac's?

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No more credible than any other person trying to rationalize an unusual experience, by saying 'Bigfoot did it'.

 

Biologists have as much right to be wrong about something as anyone else.

OK, so what has a hand and throws pine cones in the Wind River range?

 

A. People can tell stories about things throwing pine cones.  Or, mistakenly assume something is throwing a pine cone that is blowing in the wind.

B. Squirrels have hands, and have been known to throw PCs

You forgot the part about the hand going over the top of the tent, was that a squirrel too?

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