norseman

Bigfoot caloric intake.

157 posts in this topic

Yep, even the squirrels in D.C. LOL. As far as being a primitive Human though? My jury is out on that one. I think they are pre-primitive Human. Back when what we might call Humans were still little more than smart animals. They had a more Human body with all of the advantages it affords. T\And that's where they left the apes behind. It would seem Sasquatch has left the apes behind as well for the same reason but fell short of cave art. They apparently are still short of cave art. However like apes I think they need to eat a lot; way more than our piddely 2,000 calories a day.

Edited by hiflier
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Hiflier,

 

Consider this, if you wanted to remain undetected, would you leave art artifacts, evidence of permanent dwelling abode or other signs to benchmark a pattern of behavior upon?

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Of course not. But the question remains whether Sasquatch is doing that as a conscious intentional act. Or if artifacts and permanent abodes are not even on their wish list because they just haven't reached that level in the evolutionary sense.

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Logic tells us that a bipedal primate is somewhere evolutionary speaking between Homo Sapiens and Chimpanzees.

 

Chimpanzees are 98.9% the same genes as modern humans. 1.1% genetic difference seperates us. That is very little.

 

Chimpanzees are not dumb, they are crazy smart. There is no such thing as a dumb ape. So a Bigfoot is somewhere between us and them, which is no slouch. What makes me think they are not apart of the Homo lineage is that they seem to lack tools and fire. Chimps, Gorillas and Orangs utilize tools to a degree and I'm sure Sasquatch does as well. But unlike them, we obsess over tools, and we pack our favorite tool where we go.

 

Neanderthal male fore arms are curved from the constant thrusting action of his spear. It was his constant companion. We also see it in modern humans like English Longbowman of medieval times.

 

we don't see this level of tool interconnectedness with other great ape species (great apes include humans).

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Homo Genus did not have prior to, say, 500,000 years ago.

So Homo Erectus or Homo Habilis (the thinking is they may not be separate as no boundary) still fits.

   And if you look at the skulls you see  something like the skull of a Bigfoot after about 2 million YBP.

Again, Erectus and Habilis.

I think a chimp has about a 500 cc skull so the are twice as brainy as a Chimp.

Since a lot of our brain is for speech and social processing then they are as smart as us minus speech and social processing.

Perhaps fire is the true boundary, and with that came art, poetry, foods that let our cranium grow as we save all that investment in robust intestines and jaw muscles. Invest all that energy in a bigger brain. The fire represented the spiritual fire within, a conceptual fire weaving meanings of abstraction from sounds, weaving matter to suit our needs, weaving speech to modulate our social environment.

 

brain-evolutionjpg_orig.jpg

Edited by Cryptic Megafauna
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Norse said 

"Well....any primate is more intelligent than a squirrel. Just sayin......"

You, my good sir, never met my ex, it would seem.....:D

 

CM- bone marrow, uncooked, was the kicking off point for our brain development/heightened protein consumption.....

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As was the high protein and omega-3 from a fish diet, as was DNA mutation as a result of a high concentration of radiation due to cosmic ray bombardment as was....as was.... What I'm getting at is that our direct ancestors were in the right place at the right time in order to develop into the Cro-Magnons that replaced Neanderthal. All it took really was for the pre-frontal cortex to become just a little bit more robust.  

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On 1/27/2017 at 11:00 PM, guyzonthropus said:

CM- bone marrow, uncooked, was the kicking off point for our brain development/heightened protein consumption.....

Are you quoting me back to myself? 

I posted that at some point. 

 

Or I guess your "boning" up on some hominid anthropology.;)

 

It was also the beginning of hand axes and ultimately nuclear weapons and death rays.

 

Edited by Cryptic Megafauna
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Gotta love a good boning pun!

 

But no, not quoting you, just reiterating mainstream consensus like I always do!:ph34r: lol

 

I think one of the most significant shifts had to have been when abstract communication began, as that opens up huge realms of cognition and social complexity..similar,to a degree, to the development of the written word, in that it represents a quantum jump in the ability and capacity to transfer acquired knowledges to others and the next generation, in a sense, the first hard drive was but a word....

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On 1/27/2017 at 3:26 PM, Yuchi1 said:

 

Dumb primate? No.

 

Primitive human? Yep.

 

It just makes sense they could and would.

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Watching the above video makes me wonder what the videographer thought about all of the tracks left in snow while roving bands of bigfeet searched for prey to consume during winter......or did he even consider it?

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Thanks Norseman. The mention of habitat fragmentation was interesting. And that's something that occurs naturally as well as functionally so both Nature and Humans are factors to consider. Does anyone ever think that when a moratorium on logging is ordered for a certain region (does that ever happen?) then greed might find a way around it?

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Since the spotted owl donny brook in the 80's, logging on federal ground has been curbed substantially.

 

And I know fragmentation and human activity is a big deal with Grizzly Bears.

 

The problem with my link is you need to be a Rhodes scholar to read it! Of which I am not!

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