norseman

Night Vision vs Full Color Vision

48 posts in this topic

We have talked about this before, but I cannot find it.

 

Bigfoot reportedly has excellent night vision. But like in the 911 books its reported that wearing bright colors such as red is a risk.

 

All great Apes including man sees in full color(trichromatic vision). And some human women actually see in a hyper version of that.

 

Its been theorized that this color vision aided in being able to identify ripe fruit from green fruit.

 

Predators like coyotes on the other hand have excellent night vision but cannot see red or orange hues. They see them as green.

 

It would seem that scientifically speaking there is a trade off here between color and night vision.

 

Does Bigfoot truly have night vision? Or is it using moonlight or other senses? 

 

Do people wear bright colors when they head out into the woods? Or do they heed the 911 books warning and wear camo or earth tones.

 

Ive personally worn bright colors and hiked armed in the hopes of illiciting a response.

 

What do others think is happening here?

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Lot of questions in there.  

 

I am convinced they have exceptional night vision.   I don't think that comes at the expense of color vision.   The reason is simple, the sheer size of the eyes.   If their rods and cones are packed as densely as ours and their eyes are much bigger, then they would have many more of both.    The bigger the eyes are, the less necessary a tradeoff becomes.    Geometry meets biology.

 

I don't, however, know that they have color vision.   I assume so, but it is an assumption, not knowledge, not experience.   I do know that something very very heavy with a long stride walking around out there on 2 feet in the dark has night vision far beyond mine.  That I've experienced.

 

Consider the possibility they can tell whether fruit is ripe by smell, not sight.   I went for a drive Friday night and I could smell the huckleberries when I rolled the windows down.  My nose isn't particularly good.   Too many household chemicals.   I bet they can tell better than I can just by smell.    There could be other things ... if they're familiar with the kind of fruit, then perhaps the surface reflectiveness changes, something they could see without color vision.    Talk to a person who is colorblind and find out what their visual cues are.  

 

I'm not sure your question about bright colors is in the context Paulides intended.   I do avoid bright colors now even more than I used to.   There is a second component to many of the cases Paulides mentions bright colors in which you seem to omit: the unexpected appearance of bad weather immediately following the disappearance which interferes with the search.   This, at least as inferred by Paulides, seems to imply one of two things: either whatever is doing the abduction can control the weather or whatever is doing the abducting has better forecasting ability than we do ... or at least than we did at the time of the incident since many are older cases.   

 

Regarding bright colors, I do not worry about their visibility from ground level, I worry about their visibility from above.  The day my compass and GPS both went wonky and would not settle on North, I was ... concerned.  

 

MIB

 

edit / adding addendum - for more about weather, look at the North America and Beyond volume in the index under "bad weather".

 

 

 

 

Edited by MIB
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I have both a deuteranomaly and protanomaly, which enabled me to see hiding positions where the enemy had cut greenery that morning to camoflage positons from the air.

 

At night, in darkness, none of us have color vision.  We can't even look directly at a point and get a look at an object - having to look to the side of the object to see them as our cones are not in the center of our eye.  

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I think the wearing of bright colors mainly involves the color red more than other colors. In the animal world red signifies wounded or dying prey that is bleeding. To a predator this means easy pickens. I know this is true from hunting and fishing. So some animals can see the color red.

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9 hours ago, TritonTr196 said:

I think the wearing of bright colors mainly involves the color red more than other colors. In the animal world red signifies wounded or dying prey that is bleeding. To a predator this means easy pickens. I know this is true from hunting and fishing. So some animals can see the color red.

 

When I read a couple of those Missing 411's, I was thinking the same thing.  Red is immediately identified with blood.  As in wounded.

 

Good point.

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9 hours ago, TritonTr196 said:

I think the wearing of bright colors mainly involves the color red more than other colors. In the animal world red signifies wounded or dying prey that is bleeding. To a predator this means easy pickens. I know this is true from hunting and fishing. So some animals can see the color red.

 

In most of my years hunting ive worn a Filson red plaid wool coat. And my father did as well before me. If I was on public ground with game wardens to contend with id tie a cheap orange vest over it.

 

And id bet that historically tons of deer and elk were shot in the north woods while wearing red plaid. It was kind of hunters orange before hunters orange.

 

What does this mean? Not sure, except that most prey does not seem to see it.

 

And any avid predator hunter will tell you to use a red light at night. For one it doesnt ruin your night vision and for two it doesnt spook the coyotes. I had one that clamped onto my scope of my 22 250. It worked great.

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13 hours ago, FarArcher said:

I have both a deuteranomaly and protanomaly, which enabled me to see hiding positions where the enemy had cut greenery that morning to camoflage positons from the air.

 

At night, in darkness, none of us have color vision.  We can't even look directly at a point and get a look at an object - having to look to the side of the object to see them as our cones are not in the center of our eye.  

 

Reminds me of a funny story.

 

I was about 13 and my father and cousin and I had a bonfire going on the ranch. Dad was drinking beer and telling stories. I thought I was some sort of mountain man and I snuck away from the fire. Why? I have no idea but I had inherited my fathers inclination for pranks.

 

I was wearing a gray hoodie with a black oakland raider t shirt on underneath. I could hear him telling my cousin who is just months older than me that he could see me because the army trained him to use the side of his eye to see better at night.

 

I took that hoodie off and put it on a snow berry bush and zipped it up. And started very slowly circling the fire.

 

My father kept pointing to the hoodie and declaring he could still see me. His pickup was about 20 feet away from the fire and the ice chest was in the back.

 

I just crawled under the pickup and waited. When he came for another Rainer pounder and throw away his empty I growled and grabbed his leg:)

 

Needless to say he went one way and the cooler of beer went the other. He wasnt very happy with me.

 

I had alot of fun with my dad and miss him sorely.

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I know the military used to use red light to preserve night vision as the rods didn't react to red light, but today, low levels of red, green, and green-blue are what's being used.

 

Any color if bright will bleach out Rhodopsin - which will take about 30 minutes to recover your night vision - even red, green, or blue-green.  Depending on bleach-out, could take an hour to go back to full night vision.

 

Or, you can use an eye patch over your shooting eye.

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30 minutes ago, Yuchi1 said:

^^^ Does BF use a red light at night?

 

No. But does he see it if I do? Is his vision more like a gorilla? Or a coyote?

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Which is the same as a Gorilla....

 

So you do not believe they have night vision?

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Anecdotal evidence indicates that they can see at least somewhat into the infrared spectrum. Humans can see some of the lower IR frequencies to some extent, at least the glow of IR led's used with security cameras (typically around the 800 nm range if memory serves). Brian Brown reported that after they installed the video surveillance system around their cabins in "X", leaving the cameras on at night would guarantee that they could get some sleep. Another report, possibly related to the Honobia, OK incidents, had them marking the illumination limits of security cameras installed around a home, using sticks or similar found objects.

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21 hours ago, MIB said:

Lot of questions in there.  

 

I am convinced they have exceptional night vision.   I don't think that comes at the expense of color vision.   The reason is simple, the sheer size of the eyes.   If their rods and cones are packed as densely as ours and their eyes are much bigger, then they would have many more of both.    The bigger the eyes are, the less necessary a tradeoff becomes.    Geometry meets biology.

 

I don't, however, know that they have color vision.   I assume so, but it is an assumption, not knowledge, not experience.   I do know that something very very heavy with a long stride walking around out there on 2 feet in the dark has night vision far beyond mine.  That I've experienced.

 

Consider the possibility they can tell whether fruit is ripe by smell, not sight.   I went for a drive Friday night and I could smell the huckleberries when I rolled the windows down.  My nose isn't particularly good.   Too many household chemicals.   I bet they can tell better than I can just by smell.    There could be other things ... if they're familiar with the kind of fruit, then perhaps the surface reflectiveness changes, something they could see without color vision.    Talk to a person who is colorblind and find out what their visual cues are.  

 

I'm not sure your question about bright colors is in the context Paulides intended.   I do avoid bright colors now even more than I used to.   There is a second component to many of the cases Paulides mentions bright colors in which you seem to omit: the unexpected appearance of bad weather immediately following the disappearance which interferes with the search.   This, at least as inferred by Paulides, seems to imply one of two things: either whatever is doing the abduction can control the weather or whatever is doing the abducting has better forecasting ability than we do ... or at least than we did at the time of the incident since many are older cases.   

 

Regarding bright colors, I do not worry about their visibility from ground level, I worry about their visibility from above.  The day my compass and GPS both went wonky and would not settle on North, I was ... concerned.  

 

MIB

 

edit / adding addendum - for more about weather, look at the North America and Beyond volume in the index under "bad weather".

 

 

 

 

 

I waited on this because I needed to do some reading.

 

But it would seem despite Gorillas being much larger than us they still have poor night vision. 

 

I cannot find if their actual eyeball is larger than ours though. But it may indicate that a larger body size does not necessarily mean a larger eyeball.

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18 hours ago, norseman said:

Which is the same as a Gorilla....

 

So you do not believe they have night vision?

 

Where did I say they (gorillas) didn't have NV?

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