norseman

Night Vision vs Full Color Vision

48 posts in this topic

19 hours ago, Incorrigible1 said:

In addition, rods in human eyes are most numerous in the retina in the areas surrounding the center of our vision, the cones are concentrated in the area that provides the central area of our vision. It's an old stargazer's tip that when viewing a dim object in the night sky, not to look at it directly, but to use the edge of your vision to see it better.

So that means BF might have more rods in the center of the retina and may have a hard time moving around when it's bright out.

 

Kind of like thick rainforests at night and at altitude.

No one is going to be walking around without a flashlight, most we be in a tent in camp, none are going to venture up steep canyons in the deep bush, lights out and silent. One way to never be seen.

 

I suspect other cryptid animals that are rarely seen is because they move around in terrain inhospitable to man at night.

 

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7 minutes ago, Cryptic Megafauna said:

So that means BF might have more rods in the center of the retina and may have a hard time moving around when it's bright out.

 

Might.   Another angle (maybe complementary rather than opposing) is what the range of their pupil dilation is.    It might be useful to know how fast their pupils dilate or contract thus how quickly they can adapt to changes in light intensity, not just how far apart the end-points are.

 

MIB 

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If they live in isolated areas then they aren't competing with us so no need to forage at night. In any case changes to the eyes to allow night vision is a pretty radical evolutionary change. It's not like hair color or a 10% bigger body size.

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Anecdotal story here, take it for what it is worth...

 

 

 

A researcher once told me of an incident where the witness was having nightly, or at least very regular, visits from Bigfoot (unsure if it was one or multiple creatures). The witness decided that they wanted to get a better look at the visitor(s). One night they stayed out on their deck to wait. They had some kind of IR scope/vision equipment and an illuminator. Sure enough, eventually the visitor arrived and was making their way across the back of the yard near the tree line if I remember correctly. The witness waited a bit and then turned on the emitter to light it up. As soon as they switched on the light, the Bigfoot stopped, looked directly at the witness, and then vacated the area very quickly.

 

 

 

Does this prove anything, no. But it might possibly indicate that BF does have at least some sort of basic IR vision. I will admit that something else could have spooked the subject at that precise instant, but this is certainly something that warrants further study in my opinion. It would explain why game cams fail (along with probably a number of other factors) to get decent shots. After staking out a new game cam for a while, they should quickly learn that an IR light comes on whenever something moves in front of it. Therefore, do not walk into that area.

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^^^ To validate the above, in total darkness, have a person stand 100 yards away with NV on (IR illuminator turned off) while you are looking in that direction with your NV on. Have the other person turn the IR illuminator of their NV equipment to the on position while you are still observing him/her with your own NV equipment. Their IR illuminator will display a cone of light similar to that of an incandescent flashlight. So, if you can see in the IR spectrum, you should be able to see such w/o using NV equipment yourself.

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What about a flir? Is it projecting anything forward?

 

We had one in the fire dept to look for hotspots during mop up. It was so sensitive it would show you a recent handprint.

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23 hours ago, MIB said:

 

Might.   Another angle (maybe complementary rather than opposing) is what the range of their pupil dilation is.    It might be useful to know how fast their pupils dilate or contract thus how quickly they can adapt to changes in light intensity, not just how far apart the end-points are.

 

MIB 

The problem is that great apes do not seem to have night vision from what can be found by a quick google.

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Maybe it's a problem, maybe it's not.  Maybe we're not calling the same thing "night vision."   I'm just saying they can see in the dark, I don't care if it's night vision or not.  :)   That's based on experience, not theory, not google search.  

 

MIB

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Thats not correct MIB. I would say based on your experience they "operate" at night. Assuming of course what you heard outside your tent was a Bigfoot.

 

It would been nice if you had observed two bigfeet playing frisbee that night;) then we would know!

 

 

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I couldn't observe them ... it was dark.  :)     

 

Regarding your question about FLIR, FLIR is passive I.R., it doesn't project anything, it generates images from heat in the environment.   FLIR operates on longer wavelengths than active IR cameras like trail cams which are just barely below visible limits.  

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norse, FLIR (Forward Looking InfraRed) is a passive system, and does not emit, only senses heat generated by objects. It is also known as thermal imaging. You can get thermal scopes on Amazon starting at around $1000, but most start out at $2000 and head up from there. I have never used one as they are still way out of my price range for the time being, and cannot attest to the quality of these "cheaper" systems.

 

 

For example, this one has a 1400 yard range and lists at $3500:

 

https://www.amazon.com/Pulsar-Apex-XD50A-Thermal-Riflescope/dp/B00P45CJRS/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1473983187&sr=8-1&keywords=thermal+image+scopes

 

 

 

MIB beat to this while I was working on this post...

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Bigfoot likely has better night vision than we do, but since the light wave lengths in the color spectrum aren't there at night, certain colors wouldn't be perceptible at night. If the other apes have color vision, then I would expect an enhanced version of what we have.

 

It is true that we see better at night in our peripheral vision in terms of light sensitivity.

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If they have far infrared then they may be able to see heat signatures and microwaves.

Ultra violet and we start getting into radio waves.

The human body and most of nature puts of electromagnetic radiation.

So perhaps they see the frequencies we think on ;)

With ultrasonic they can do electromagnetic interference on our electromagnetism and stun us out disrupt our nervous integrity causing trance, hypnosis, sleep, perhaps coma and death if you go to the extreme of that spectrum (of disturbance).

So maybe they are transmitters and receivers of strange ultraviolet's?

radio communications at near infra reds?

You laugh but we have cell towers and electric eels.  :scratchhead:

The only solution to catching one and finding out while preventing Bigfoot from reading your thoughts

or penetrating your invisibility shield are to spray tin foil black and make a suit.

Ear plugs and a matching tinfoil hat make the man.

Forest wear for the seriously inclined.

 

 

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On 9/15/2016 at 5:53 PM, VAfooter said:

norse, FLIR (Forward Looking InfraRed) is a passive system, and does not emit, only senses heat generated by objects. It is also known as thermal imaging. You can get thermal scopes on Amazon starting at around $1000, but most start out at $2000 and head up from there. I have never used one as they are still way out of my price range for the time being, and cannot attest to the quality of these "cheaper" systems.

 

 

For example, this one has a 1400 yard range and lists at $3500:

 

https://www.amazon.com/Pulsar-Apex-XD50A-Thermal-Riflescope/dp/B00P45CJRS/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1473983187&sr=8-1&keywords=thermal+image+scopes

 

 

 

MIB beat to this while I was working on this post...

 

FLIR has a new product, Scout TK Thermal Vision Monocular / Camera, available from their website for $599.00:

http://www.flir.com/hunting-outdoor/scouttk/?pi_ad_id=113432411665&gclid=Cj0KEQjwvIO_BRDt27qG3YX0w4wBEiQAsGu3eS7z8LCguXg3KrYSVbjslRWpCGFG6eJWDzUhN-_cgUAaAmub8P8HAQ

Sportsman's Guide also lists it at the same price, though members of their Buyer's Club get a 10% discount:

http://www.sportsmansguide.com/product/index/flir-scout-tk-thermal-vision-monocular-camera?a=1952631

Here is a photo of the unit from the FLIR site:

specs-scouttk.jpg

 

Here are three sample photos from a buyer review on Sportsman's Guide:

 

Flir 1.jpg

 

flir 2.jpg

 

flir 3.jpg

 

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Many like to compare apes eyes to whatever these things are.  Gorilla, monkey, or chimp.  They're not the same.  Indicative of, but not proof of - different vision.

 

Some suggest we humans have certain vision capabilities and certain visual limitations.  You check the experts, and they'll tell you that humans visual limitation range is 400-700 nanometers.  Wrong.

 

Humans can, under special circumstances see in the 740-780 nm range.  As verified by the US military.

 

Humans also, under special circumstances, see an impossible 1064 nm frequency.  As verified by the US military.  Which cost them a lot of money front to back.

 

When the human eye is dark-adapted, the rods become the primary sensors, which is why you can't see color under night conditions.  Under scoptopic conditions, the eye is much more sensitive to light in general.

 

So when we do all this speculation on what they can or can't see - color at night for example, or near-infrared, truth is - we only have indications - none of which come from comparing to apes capabilities.  Or man's.

 

 

Edited by FarArcher
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