hiflier

Where Are The Dead Sasquatch?

153 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

I also lived around Morristown, VT for a short time. Used to go through Stow and over Smuggler's Notch to bypass Morristown sometimes to get to RT.15 Actually lived North of Smuggler's Notch on 108 in Jeffersonville out past the Lamoille River. Sometimes went to the Library (a tavern) to shoot billiards. Used to go to Smuggler's Notch too to watch the rock climbers at the top of the pass. The place looked magical.

Edited by hiflier
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/2/2017 at 2:53 PM, SWWASAS said:

For those hardy enough or foolish enough to do field work in the winter, it does have one big advantage.   It is very difficult for a living hunter gatherer to move around on snow covered landscape without leaving footprints.      I hope a clear day opportunity comes up soon so I can scout deep in the snow covered back country of Skamania County with my airplane.   Footprints in the snow 30 miles from the nearest road are unlikely to be human without snowmobile tracks nearby.   I can differentiate snow shoe tracks from boot or bare footprint tracks from the air.    Just cannot measure or determine if they were a bare footprint or boot from the air.       If some area is active, miles from the nearest road, it might point out active areas worth checking out when the snow cover allows.  .  

 

Just wondering if you were able to make a flight this week? With the cold but clear and sunny weather. I agree with you on the ability to differentiate between snowshoe tracks and boot or bare foot tracks from the air. I might add that in snow over 6" most people tend to shuffle through the snow. Then the problem arises of trying to differentiate people from other animals. If you did spot a clear inline trackway in deeper snow then you could probably eliminate people or other animals. 

 

Another thought came to mind that if you lived in areas of large deciduous forest and snow fall. Not like our evergreen forests. It would be great to be able to fly over those areas in the winter. Anything large, dark and moving would be fairly easy to spot. Especially if it was leaving tracks behond. Just a thought. 

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought this was interesting, and although it doesn't directly add to our knowledge of what BF might do with their dead, it was still impressive and informative. If a badger can bury a cow this well, I imagine one or more BF could bury another BF pretty darn effectively if it/they needed to. Linked article includes timelapse video of a badger burying a cow:

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/mar/31/can-you-dig-it-badger-captured-on-camera-burying-cow

 

From the accompanying article:

Quote

 

An American badger has been captured burying the carcass of a cow – a previously unrecorded behaviour – in an astonishing display of the creature’s digging prowess.

 

The images were taken by camera traps set up by researchers who had left seven calf carcasses in Utah’s Grassy Mountains in January last year in an attempt to study which scavengers descended on the animals.


“I was expecting we were going to get a lot of vultures and maybe some eagles and coyotes and different things,” said Evan Buechley, a doctoral candidate at the University of Utah and co-author of the study. “But then this badger stole the show.”

 

 

Or, as someone else put it, "the cow was badgered, but the badger was not cowed."

4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Excellent reference, JustAGuy, and btw, fairly amazing you have more plusses than postings. Good on you! (Gave ya one, too.)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pondering this subject, it occurred to me that there are only so many possibilities that may answer the title question and a comprehensive list must be easily compiled. Forgive me if this has been covered before.

 

 Assuming that Sasquatch are indeed large, unclassified hominids that are real, biological creatures subject to the usual natural physical laws the answer has to be one of the following:

 

1) They go to extreme measures to dispose of their dead, measures that go beyond the bounds of anything that might include cannibalism but would also include deliberate ritual burial and/or actions taken for the specific purpose of concealment.

 

2) They exist in such low numbers and are so elusive, the possibility of finding a carcass is astronomical.

 

3) There is some aspect of Bigfoot biology that is unique to the species and this affects the manner/timeframe in which remains decompose.

 

4) Bodies have been recovered but the findings are suppressed.

 

5) No bodies to find.

 

6) Creatures did exist but are now extinct.

 

7) Remains encountered but mistaken for more conventional fauna.

 

9) Physical evidence recovered but findings in dispute.

 

10) Unknown factors.

 

 

Anyone anything to add or speculate with regards to possible unknown factors?

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I personally lean toward possibly 4

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Remember that your options are not mutually exclusive.   From your list, I'll take 1 and 7 with some confidence and a probability of 2, 4, and 9 contributing as well.  Plus, of course, 10. 

 

Editorial comment: insistence that all occurrences of an observed result must come from one cause is the territory of fools ... and of scoftics trying to set up a straw-man to knock down.  It has nothing to do with the reality of our physical world.

 

MIB

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Startling:    I have never seen a bear body in the woods.   I know they are there for a while until the scavegers get to them.       Supposedly some where killed and gathered together for a mass burial after the Mt St Helens eruption.     I wish we could find a whistle blower to confirm that.    There are a couple of stories about forest fire kills.     Separating BF mythology from factual accounts is difficult.      Then again, if that Mt St Helens whistle blower comes forward,  we have to believe his story, just like we have to believe any witness.account.     Having a body in possession is key, even in skeletal form.     If we could find that Mt St Helens burial site, then there would be no more dispute, either about existence or government cover up.     .  

Edited by SWWASAS
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, SWWASAS said:

Startling:    I have never seen a bear body in the woods.   I know they are there for a while until the scavegers get to them.       Supposedly some where killed and gathered together for a mass burial after the Mt St Helens eruption.     I wish we could find a whistle blower to confirm that.    There are a couple of stories about forest fire kills.     Separating BF mythology from factual accounts is difficult.      Then again, if that Mt St Helens whistle blower comes forward,  we have to believe his story, just like we have to believe any witness.account.     Having a body in possession is key, even in skeletal form.     If we could find that Mt St Helens burial site, then there would be no more dispute, either about existence or government cover up.     .  

A friend I worked with was in the National Guard, he was mainly stationed at the road blocks prior to and after the eruption. He wanted to and was able to do a helicopter fly in looking for missing persons shortly after the eruption.

 

I asked him about finding any dead Bigfoot. He said  some pilots  had made up stories about finding a dead Bigfoot, just a hoax for the guardsmen, When he flew in they landed at a spot where there was supposedly a dead Bigfoot, all a joke I think to lighten the mood.

 

But you never know. Personalty I believed my friend no Bigfoot found.  

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that bones get eaten ,chewed up .

 

I find it a bit puzzling that a few people think we should be finding their bones . I'm going to give just a for instance .

When I use to deer hunt in CT there was a swamp in the 1500 acres I hunted .

The swamp was maybe about 40 to 60 acres give or take .  I can say   with some authority that not a soul had wadded through that place in 100 years or ever for that matter.

 

What I'm trying to get at is these creatures I believe know when they are dying same as all other animals do. The old deer who finds a bunch of soft pines to lay down on.

Your family dog who stops  eating and drinking  and goes to find a quiet spot to die . I believe that they go to areas where we just won't walk into and lay down to die.

I don't think they bury their own or anything like that. Most places we walk in the wilds are just that ,places where we can walk . It's our nature even when hunting big game

to take the path of least resistance . There's swamps that humans have never walked through or deep thickets that we walk around while hiking or even when searching for Bigfoot.

 

 

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Daveedoe the prime mission of the National Guard was human rescue and recovery.     There were a few rescued but most of the job was recovering bodies.      Some burned badly or suffocated by ash.     Not a pleasant task for the crews so I would imagine the crews did things to lighten the mood.       Then again we do not have any reports from the crews themselves.     People on the ground were reported to have seen a tarp fly off a stack of bodies.    I do not recall about sightings North and East of the Mountain before the eruption.    Perhaps someone with a good data base would know.      Anything in the blast zone was vaporized or covered with debris.     The Eastern flanks had the lahar flow so anything there would have been covered also.    Areas of that were protected by topography and there are still patches of forest up to the tree line.     It could be that BF simply left.     The harmonic tremors were going on days before and BF may have actually been able to hear them if they can hear infrasound.   Animals have been known to leave the vicinity of a pending eruption because of the earthquakes.        Far enough away and ash fall was the killer instead of blast.    .     Most of ash went East.       So the West and South flanks were survivable.      That mountain has a history of eruptions back in recent history.    It was erupting when Lewis and Clark went past in the early 1800s.     Perhaps BF had an oral history and knew to get out of the area when the mountain started acting up.      Depending how long they live,   180 years is only a few generations.  

 

  I do walk the stream banks on the East side hoping to find a BF body washing out of the ash layer.   That seems the most likely way to find a BF body / skeleton that I can think of.     But that might be a waste of time if  BF were smart enough to have left the area.       .  

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

I watched the eruption on May 18 1980 from Vancouver on top of the grain elevator, it was so surreal. I was witnessing my play ground being destroyed. I am glad I had to work on that Sunday because I might have been near the mountain.

I had always thought Bigfoot would have not been on the mountain but could have been in the Mt Margret wilderness that we know was devastated.  Or to the east wear so much of the ash fell. Bigfoot would have been OK on the south side. 

. My friend who was in the Guard went in after all the survivors had been rescued and was on a search for the missing most who were never found. His main job before and after was road blocks. He had asked and was able to do some search fly ins to the blast area. 

I have climbed the Mountain 5 times and have hiked into the blast area shortly after the eruption when allowed. It amazes me to think how much material there is from the land slide, having played in those areas before the eruption. Not to mention the distance the blast traveled! 

 

I still do not believe there was a pile of Bigfoot bodies kept from the public. Not sure where any bodies would be but we need to keep looking just in case.

Edited by daveedoe
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I went down there in '83 or '84 (I'm pretty sure, I was attending U. of Pueget Sound at the time) coming in from the NW side, got up to the final blockade, but still surrounded by all the downed timber, an amazing sight, ran into a bio prof of mine doing amphibian population impact studies, but most everything under all those trees had little chance. I haven't been back, So I don't know if they ever did anything with the timber or if it's still there, but I'd bet there's at least one body under all that wood...

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The blast zone has very draconian rules about where you can hike.     Off trail gets you a $500 fine in the monument in an area they designate.   That would be where I would look if you could legally.      They pretty well left everything alone in that zone just to see what it did on its own.   .   Beyond that to the North is Weyerhaeuser  private forest, and down timber there was salvaged, replanted, and it this point in time getting pretty tall.    You can bet the lumber company did not find anything that might stop its timber harvesting in the future.   One of these days I would like to get  Weyerhaueser guy in a bar, buy him some drinks and see what he has seen in their private forests.  

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, SWWASAS said:

.   One of these days I would like to get  Weyerhaueser guy in a bar, buy him some drinks and see what he has seen in their private forests.  

 

I like how you think, plussed you for this.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites