FarArcher

One Thing Bothers Me About Bigfoot Tree Knocks

106 posts in this topic

8 hours ago, BobbyO said:

I'll just give you some "knock" numbers from the SSR's 252 knock reports Continent wide.

 

65% in hours of darkness.

56% of those reports in hours of darkness come on times of the night when the moon is visible.

October is the most common month for a knock report, with a report in October being 32% more likely than any other month.

 

The numbers differ of course when narrowed down though by geographical area though and WA State where i look at a lot.

 

The Southern WA Cascades for example and its 31 reports.

76% in hours of darkness, a 17% increase on Continent wide reports.

36% of those reports in hours of darkness come on times of the night when the moon is visible, a 36% decrease on Continent wide reports.

June is the most common month for a knock report, with a report in June being 100% more likely than any other month.

 

Different strokes for different folks.

 

If anyone wants any State specific info on knocks, just shout and i'll add to the thread..

 

 

 

Thanks, Bobby.  

 

Reason is, and this is my personal belief only - it's a method of "driving" game when hunting toward the ambushers.  It also acts to let each "driver" know where the other driver is.  

 

Note that 1) most are at night (when I think they hunt the most),

 

that 2) June is a month when snow is melting - especially at higher elevations - and they need those calories after a long winter with less movement and hunting opportunities,

 

and 3) October is when winter is pressing, and if they're going to hunt and stockpile meat - they have to press harder before the heavy snows fall, and also the cooler weather helps preserve their carcasses.

 

I'm not saying there won't be knocks for other purposes, and I'm not saying there won't be knocks in other times - I'm just saying that if this is one method of driving game and maintaining contact with other drivers, that could possibly explain the pattern being heavier in Spring and Fall.  Terrain and snowfall differences may explain the differences in the reports.  

 

Then again, it could be due to more hunters in the field in October, and more hikers in June.

 

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I agree with a lot of that FA, and most certainly your theories and why.

 

I'll have a check at the other WA geographical zones to se ethos they match up where the seasons are concerned, and other states.

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Ok, in WA State and 60 total knock reports, those October numbers hold weight with the month being most popular in all geographical zones, the South Cascades as mentioned, the Olympic Peninsula, the North Cascades and Eastern WA.

 

June comes in as second most popular month state wide too.

 

Interesting to note where the June reports are concerned in WA, the average elevation of report is around the 2,300ft mark, with two at 3,500ft and just one report under 1,000ft (with the rest in between).

 

83% of those June reports ^^ come from times of the night when the moon isn't visible too.

 

Michigan = June most common, October/April second.

Edited by BobbyO
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In another thread someone brought up a kind of cycle for widespread activity in the Spring, finding stick structures in the Summer,  high activity in the Fall, and almost no activity in the Winter. I generally was correlating the finding to procreation cycles and supplying food to pregnant females in the Fall, and newborns with an inactive female in the Spring. In the Fall and Spring Males would be more needed to hunt/gather food for those females and new offspring. It may possibly line op with the seasonal group hunting hypothesis. Interesting.

 

FarArcher, what season was your sighting? .

Edited by hiflier
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I have chased down knocks that repeated and found two trees knocking together.    Also there are spastic woodpeckers that do not have much rhythm and only hit two or three times in a row.     That kind of thing can happen in nature.   Certainly tree or branch falls can also produce events like that.      In the woods,   wind can produce all kinds of single or limited knocking events.       And then there are the BFRO types who knock routinely.    I  have parked my truck,   slammed the door and heard a distant knock in response to it several times.    Do I know any were produced by BF?   No.   The only one I can pin on BF was preceded by foot falls that sounded like King Cong coming through the woods at me.    I think most knocking reports can be attributed to BFRO claims that it is sign of BF activity. Certainly most I have investigated were something other than BF.      Which with all the humans doing it,  how can we discount that we are not teaching BF to do it?   After all monkey see, monkey do.    I would be curious how often knocking reports happened before "Finding Bigfoot" started airing compared to after it started.     They did knocks from day one.  

Edited by SWWASAS
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22 hours ago, hiflier said:

 

This is a hunting Forum and post #25, the important one, was written in 2009: http://forum.gon.com/showthread.php?t=391964 I never knew turkeys knocked until I read this.

Interesting thread and new information about turkey behavior. I did not realize they made these sounds, either. Still, I would guess the sound is really more of a loud "cluck" than a true "knock" sound. And as the poster writes, he observed the bird making the sounds in succession. But yes, I imagine there are lots and lots of natural "knock" sounds made outdoors that have nothing to do with our big friends (as SWWAS suggests, above).

 

I experienced my first "knock" while camping in the Sierras this summer (I awoke to hear the second of two; my brother who was awake heard both knocks coming from the ridge about our campsite). Its sheer volume and resonance alone suggested no human (or bird) was capable of such a sound. Really a cool event!

Edited by Gotta Know
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7 hours ago, FarArcher said:

 

 

Thanks, Bobby.  

 

Reason is, and this is my personal belief only - it's a method of "driving" game when hunting toward the ambushers.  It also acts to let each "driver" know where the other driver is.  

 

Note that 1) most are at night (when I think they hunt the most),

 

that 2) June is a month when snow is melting - especially at higher elevations - and they need those calories after a long winter with less movement and hunting opportunities,

 

and 3) October is when winter is pressing, and if they're going to hunt and stockpile meat - they have to press harder before the heavy snows fall, and also the cooler weather helps preserve their carcasses.

 

I'm not saying there won't be knocks for other purposes, and I'm not saying there won't be knocks in other times - I'm just saying that if this is one method of driving game and maintaining contact with other drivers, that could possibly explain the pattern being heavier in Spring and Fall.  Terrain and snowfall differences may explain the differences in the reports.  

 

Then again, it could be due to more hunters in the field in October, and more hikers in June.

 

I've thought of knocks like "breaking squelch" on a radio - a way to let others in your group that you're still there and that the situation is under control.  Not sure how they teach it anymore but a long time ago in some branches of the military if you were out doing something at night, you needed to let others on your side know that you were still there but you didn't want it to be long or noisy because bad things could happen.  So you just keyed your mike on the radio for one or two seconds - enough that those on the right frequency knew you were there, not enough to attract the attention that would let bad things happen.

 

This could be for hunting, or for simply moving as a dispersed group.  The number of encounters involving more than one bigfoot encountered at a time is relatively small - 41 out of 870 reports in the northeastern neck of the US.  One reason could be that while a family group of, say 3-4, bigfoot moves as a group, they do it while dispersed over let's say a 2 mile by 2 mile wedge.  The knocks would enable the leader to signal the current location so that the others could adjust.  

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^^^ Tempting idea, but nah...  they're not that smart. It's just a big monkey.

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Dunno ... they've been smart enough to outsmart you so far.   :)     It's an interesting perspective, huh?   I never insult the opposition's intelligence 'til AFTER I beat them 'cause if I call them idiots, then lose, how stupid must I be?  :)

 

MIB

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16 minutes ago, MIB said:

Dunno ... they've been smart enough to outsmart you so far.   :) 

 

or most likely, they don't exist. The lack of evidence certainly points that way.

 

 

16 minutes ago, MIB said:

 I never insult the opposition's intelligence 'til AFTER I beat them 'cause if I call them idiots, then lose, how stupid must I be?  :)

 

Who am I insulting?  a BF?  :lol::lol::lol:

 

I'm sure they're reading this thread now and are really upset... :rolleyes:

 

 

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3 hours ago, Trogluddite said:

I've thought of knocks like "breaking squelch" on a radio - a way to let others in your group that you're still there and that the situation is under control.  Not sure how they teach it anymore but a long time ago in some branches of the military if you were out doing something at night, you needed to let others on your side know that you were still there but you didn't want it to be long or noisy because bad things could happen.  So you just keyed your mike on the radio for one or two seconds - enough that those on the right frequency knew you were there, not enough to attract the attention that would let bad things happen.

 

This could be for hunting, or for simply moving as a dispersed group.  The number of encounters involving more than one bigfoot encountered at a time is relatively small - 41 out of 870 reports in the northeastern neck of the US.  One reason could be that while a family group of, say 3-4, bigfoot moves as a group, they do it while dispersed over let's say a 2 mile by 2 mile wedge.  The knocks would enable the leader to signal the current location so that the others could adjust.  

 

Trog, a big smile crossed my face when you described "breaking squelch."  Oh yeah, on the hour, we'd break squelch to let others know we were still alive and well - and the only time we cracked the mic was for pickup.

 

You're thinking just like me - which I don't recommend here - but it's too late now!  And now you've really done it as like you, I think these things live in small family groups, but I'll go further to suggest as terrain and food allow - and if things are good - probably other families nearby they interact with.

 

I think the forests are full of idiots beating trees - that got there in vehicles.  And no one knows the 'code.'  If these things have territories as such, it could be these are to let adjacent families know they're on the edge or nearby - and to not get spooked.

 

We just don't know.  "Driving."  "Associate Locators."  "Warnings."  But it's not because they all desire to be percussionists.

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6 hours ago, hiflier said:

In another thread someone brought up a kind of cycle for widespread activity in the Spring, finding stick structures in the Summer,  high activity in the Fall, and almost no activity in the Winter. I generally was correlating the finding to procreation cycles and supplying food to pregnant females in the Fall, and newborns with an inactive female in the Spring. In the Fall and Spring Males would be more needed to hunt/gather food for those females and new offspring. It may possibly line op with the seasonal group hunting hypothesis. Interesting.

 

FarArcher, what season was your sighting? .

 

Son of a gun.  It was the second or third week of September, as we stayed a week or so into November before the snow ran us out.

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3 hours ago, gigantor said:

 

or most likely, they don't exist. The lack of evidence certainly points that way.

 

 

 

Nah, MIB is right, just smart enough to outsmart you so far.

 

Not their fault that the average field investigator thinks he's GI Joe but in fact is more reminiscent in his actions of finding evidence of this creature, to the Cookie Monster.

 

 

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9 hours ago, FarArcher said:

 

Son of a gun.  It was the second or third week of September, as we stayed a week or so into November before the snow ran us out.

 

OK. So here's a what if: What if the one on the copse was a female-as in a potential mating opportunity? Or the sound you heard there was a female already in the mating process? That guy that ran at and then by you could have been in the throes of "love" and got by you because you were the LAST thing on it's mind. If the procreation cycle is closer to that of other animals then there could very well and been an infant born in the following Spring. Just something to think about. You not going toward the copse and standing your ground might have been the exact best thing that you could've done. There could be something to this this notion of mating seasons.. 

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Where I live most of the woods bordering my marsh tend to be softer, and the wood knocks while loud are not like gun shots. My recordings capture the mushy nature of the wood around me, though I would think that they might actually have a go to knocker they might even carry around, or have some stashed. It certainly is something that I have wondered about as well, some researchers dismiss these softer sounding knocks. I understand clearly the difference between a knock and something like a wood pecker or deer antlers. Add to that the timing of the knocks and the repeated patterns of 3, 5, or 8, that seem to be followed.

Edited by Lake County Bigfooot
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