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norseman

US snow levels/Bigfoot

37 posts in this topic

Why?  Because they do.

 

Your ranch might indeed.   However, if they are as rare as you think, it's unlikely that every suitable locations actually gets used.    Could be that if there is an even better location near enough, they use that instead.  

 

How much wind do you get?   How much drifting?   Are the wintering critters out in the open or under timber?   How much wind is there in the canyon?   Snow .. drifting or not in there?    Might point out the why or why not, I'm not sure.  

 

MIB

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3 minutes ago, MIB said:

Why?  Because they do.

 

Your ranch might indeed.   However, if they are as rare as you think, it's unlikely that every suitable locations actually gets used.    Could be that if there is an even better location near enough, they use that instead.  

 

How much wind do you get?   How much drifting?   Are the wintering critters out in the open or under timber?   How much wind is there in the canyon?   Snow .. drifting or not in there?    Might point out the why or why not, I'm not sure.  

 

MIB

 

Why im beating you up about the -25 thing is because I think they burrow in like a squirrel and don't move around much in winter.

 

Part of my ranch drifts and the canyon part is protected.

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I have considered the wolf thing Norseman. And the wildfires of what? a year and a half or so? Mainly because of the on going wood salvaging operations. We really don't know how sensitive Sasquatch is to these things, where they have ended up, at what distances they moved out of the area if they indeed did move out, and whether or not wherever they went has a decent food supply. If not then they would have to go further.

 

Wildfires can create their own micro wind currents and updrafts but it might be advantageous to look back to that time and see what the general wind patterns were. Knowing that may help to determine which direction Sasquatch and other animals went to escape the smoke and smell of smoke. The smell of smoke can be quite a distance from a fire's source when running downwind from it. I'll try to get some time spans and dates for when the fires around Colville began and chase down the wind direction during the early days of those fires. Might give some ideas on good places for hunting as well?   

Edited by hiflier
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MIB, drone footage of my ranch.

 

Hifli, But we had fires from W Mt to central Wa. Where are they gonna go?

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Well that's what research is for. On the day of the beginning of the five fires (lightning strikes) the wind in Conconully was generally low and from the North most of the day with a gradual shift to the NW around 6 pm. . It got brisk as well at between 3 and 5:30 pm probably due to the thunderstorms? The 16th saw the wind remain again mostly out of the North at between 7 and 15 mph. Being five fires there may have been pinch points between fires where animals ran. Obviously animals generally to the North, East, and West of the fire complex would not go as far as the animals to the South. What is in these areas ahead of any animal flight lines (terrain) is something you may be more knowledgeable of.

 

All I can really do is give you the overall wind directions in the first few days of the fires. Something I will be glad to continue doing in order to get a look at the first say ten days? and even though there will be local wind currents in valleys and on ridges they stem for the general wind source as well as the continuing updrafts from the fires. This whole idea is only something to consider for why Sasquatch may not be in a vicinity of say 50-75 miles of a large fire remnant. Salvage operations to be included in the continuing upheaval of the area as well as the continued uprooting of many animals? Or maybe a more sensitive, intelligent animal like Sasquatch who maybe leery of ANY activity in the old areas.

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11 hours ago, norseman said:

MIB, drone footage of my ranch.

 

Hifli, But we had fires from W Mt to central Wa. Where are they gonna go?

 

West, they go west.

 

Look at the numbers.

 

Look at the increase/decrease in numbers to the relevant time frames and geographical zones.

 

 

image.jpeg

 

I don't believe that a -71% decrease in Eastern WA reports in the time period we talk of, doubled with an +86% increase in the bordering, western geographical zone (South Cascades) is a coincidence, and most especially when you consider that in the time period before that, we swung big numbers completely the other way in a role reversal, again in those same two geographical zones.

 

Look at these trends, every 5 years, the same trends between both geographical zones, increases > decreases between the South Cascades and Eastern WA, backwards and forwards, with the largest being at the height of the fires.

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Except there were numerous fires between E Wa and the Cascades in that time period. 

 

 

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Of course there was, but that would be why you're seeing movement no, which would also then be a reason why there is such a large increase/decrease in numbers in that time period too ?

 

 

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If they flee fire and central Washington had the highest concentration of forest fires, it does not make sense that they went west.

 

Much of central Wa is very arid and sits in the Cascade rain shadow.

 

If I was a Sasquatch I would have fled north deeper into the ITR.

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34 minutes ago, norseman said:

If they flee fire and central Washington had the highest concentration of forest fires, it does not make sense that they went west.

 

Why would west (the Cascades) not make sense when you take in to consideration the increase/decrease trends we see in the graph every five years from Eastern WA (which in my data includes the arid central WA area) to the South Cascades

 

My alarm bells at work would be going off, and I trust them completely..;)

 

Im gonna look in to this more, I think it's worthy of doing so for sure.

 

It should be noted however that these five year trends that in talking may or may not be fire related, we will never know.

 

Food for thought anyway.

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True, the numbers may not be fire related. Being able to factor in fires needs more specific time frames for one thing as well as what the wind was doing. But there is also much speculation involved. Such as where the fires were in relation to any BF presence. If a fire was North of a clan then they would go in the three other directions to escape it. If the clan was widespread and a fire broke out in the middle of their range they might head out in all directions. At some point in the SSR's completion it may be that a professional analysis group or individual should be called in? In which case natural upheavals in any habitat areas need to be part of the equation.

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20 hours ago, norseman said:

MIB, drone footage of my ranch.

 

Ok, gotcha.  

 

I think the configuration is wrong ... canyon need to be above the flat looking down on it which gives the hunters a tactical advantage both for watching the prey and watching to avoid the humans.   At least compared to the locations described to me, your flat has too much timber.    We're talkin' edge of the sage / prairie, not just a bench up in the woods.   Pretty spot you've got there, though.   It reminds me very much of the back / south side of Lost Creek Reservoir near Medford.   The view is sort of like your drone provides.   The roads are all up "at ranch level", no access on down to the reservoir ... and I want to get down there to fish.

 

MIB

 

 

 

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10 hours ago, BobbyO said:

 

Why would west (the Cascades) not make sense when you take in to consideration the increase/decrease trends we see in the graph every five years from Eastern WA (which in my data includes the arid central WA area) to the South Cascades

 

My alarm bells at work would be going off, and I trust them completely..;)

 

Im gonna look in to this more, I think it's worthy of doing so for sure.

 

It should be noted however that these five year trends that in talking may or may not be fire related, we will never know.

 

Food for thought anyway.

 

Quite frankly it may take them 5 years to make the 300 mile trip. I've computed daily caloric needs to keep a 800lbs body going. It's not a cheap body. They may be grazing as the meander in that direction? Just thinking out loud.

3 hours ago, MIB said:

 

Ok, gotcha.  

 

I think the configuration is wrong ... canyon need to be above the flat looking down on it which gives the hunters a tactical advantage both for watching the prey and watching to avoid the humans.   At least compared to the locations described to me, your flat has too much timber.    We're talkin' edge of the sage / prairie, not just a bench up in the woods.   Pretty spot you've got there, though.   It reminds me very much of the back / south side of Lost Creek Reservoir near Medford.   The view is sort of like your drone provides.   The roads are all up "at ranch level", no access on down to the reservoir ... and I want to get down there to fish.

 

MIB

 

 

 

 

You didn't see it probably but there are places on the mountain that look down onto the spare pasture land ridge.

 

And thanks.

3 hours ago, hiflier said:

True, the numbers may not be fire related. Being able to factor in fires needs more specific time frames for one thing as well as what the wind was doing. But there is also much speculation involved. Such as where the fires were in relation to any BF presence. If a fire was North of a clan then they would go in the three other directions to escape it. If the clan was widespread and a fire broke out in the middle of their range they might head out in all directions. At some point in the SSR's completion it may be that a professional analysis group or individual should be called in? In which case natural upheavals in any habitat areas need to be part of the equation.

 

It gets wetter to the east and north....MUCH wetter. 

 

http://www.conservationnw.org/what-we-do/british-columbia/globally-unique-rainforest

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Did sightings increase in BC during the periods of increase in the southern Cascades? Because that is to the north. The biggest fire in WA state history, the Carlton Complex fire burned almost 400 sq. mi. In 2014. It burned on the south end of the Okanogan National Forest. There were more fires to the north that year and around Lake Chelan to the west. But even with all those fires there were still forested corridors east to west many miles wide that a bigfoot could retreat to or pass through. 

 

Within a month after that large fire there were deer, bear and coyote a mile or so back into the burn area. Not much to eat for herbivores but the deer were there. 

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