FarArcher

Do You Have a BF "Honey Hole?"

99 posts in this topic

Per the narratives I've read, a number of you have had lots of interaction with these critters.  I'm sure some places have occasional "action," while there may be one or more locations of yours where you almost always have some "action," or have "action" frequently enough to return to for the experiences.

 

Do any of you have a "Honey Hole" of sites that are frequently active?

 

I don't mean you got photos, or have a game of chess with them - but when you go to these sweet spots - you almost always have them around you in varying degrees?

 

And no, I'm not asking where they are.  Just - do you have a Honey Hole or two?

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I have a couple areas I go into where we find evidence of their presence fairly consistently. If that's what you mean, then yes. But not all places I've been in are like that. 

 

Of course I've also found that if you are more familiar with an area you're more apt to see things you wouldn't notice in areas you aren't familiar with. 

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Yes, a few honey holes. One place is full of them and we have spent a lot of time, effort and money on this place. I recently purchased some new wireless trail cams to put in this place to help us monitor activity. Can't wait for them to be set up in the field. We will get the live pictures sent to us soon as it takes a pic of something. They aren't cheap. I truly think we might get lucky with the new cams in this place. I'm also looking into how I can hook up a live camera feed in this place. Several places all in TN and north GA with Bigfoot in them and they're here all year long as they have no need to migrate. While I won't post locations publically, if you're in the TN or north GA area, message me if you want to see these areas for youself. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Nowhere I can guarantee activity, but a couple places where the frequency of activity is way above mere randomness. 

 

MIB

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5 hours ago, TritonTr196 said:

Yes, a few honey holes. One place is full of them and we have spent a lot of time, effort and money on this place. I recently purchased some new wireless trail cams to put in this place to help us monitor activity. Can't wait for them to be set up in the field. We will get the live pictures sent to us soon as it takes a pic of something. They aren't cheap. I truly think we might get lucky with the new cams in this place. I'm also looking into how I can hook up a live camera feed in this place. Several places all in TN and north GA with Bigfoot in them and they're here all year long as they have no need to migrate. While I won't post locations publically, if you're in the TN or north GA area, message me if you want to see these areas for youself. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How about a Michigander that wants to make the trip south.  Are these locations open to camping?

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That's rather amazing, if one thinks about it a second.

 

Numerous locations that have occasional or even frequent activity - and of course the guarded generosity of some of the members here.

 

Amazing, as so many folks don't believe in these things, never experienced anything of consequence, and yet if we went further - many parts of the country have active populations of these things.

 

Good stuff, guys.  Good stuff.

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One good location that's been productive for years. Another that I'm sure are there but no action yet.

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8 hours ago, Twist said:

 

How about a Michigander that wants to make the trip south.  Are these locations open to camping?

 

 

Just got home from work and we had some crazy storms pass though last night and today. Gotta run out and pick up limbs and stuff that got blown all over the place out of the driveway. Give me a few hours and I'll send you a private message.

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It's been over thirty years since I've been to the place in Northern California where I had regular encounters, but that location hasn't changed.  No building or other development.  I think it is probably still a prime location and plan to return there, assuming I ever get time.

 

The locations in Lemmon Valley, Nevada may no longer qualify.  The valley has seen significant development and is very highly, as opposed to sparsely populated, now.  The undeveloped areas moving Northeast along the Western side of Pyramid Lake, through the Pah Rum Mountain Cluster, and on into Southern Idaho are probably still used as a travel route.

 

The common theme to these areas is that they would qualify as oases within their broader environment.  Lemmon Valley was a seasonal travel route (mid-summer) through arid high desert.  This means that areas along the route with easy access to water were stop-over points.  Where there was water, there was also food in the form of more succulent vegetation for direct consumption and to support prey animals like deer and jack rabbits.  There was also an abundance of "snack food" in these areas like lizards, snakes, cicadas, rodents, and small birds.  The human communities around these developed water sources also provided gardens, pets, and other food sources.  The family group that used to come through would stay for up to six weeks so long as food was plentiful, apparently staying in the hills just above the community.

 

The spot in Northern California was a high forested plateau bounded by three peaks.  Within this high plateau there were about two dozen small lakes, one developed campsite, and two or three hiking or jeep trails.  The lakes along the trails were stocked with fish every couple of years and still are.  There was a lot of activity there and the family group, again, appeared to hang out one hill away from the campsite and trail with the stocked lakes.  We had encounters there from May through September, but those were just the months that we were in the area.  The family group may be there year round for all I know.  Point is, though, that the high forested plateau provided plenty of water, food, secure areas with multiple easy infiltration and exfiltration routes, hills providing vantage points to observe human activity, and a pleasant summer climate.  It was an ideal spot within what is generally considered Squatch habitat.

 

I think that an experienced operative like yourself, FarArcher, could identify potential oases in areas where there is a history of encounters through simple map reconnaissance. That narrows things down considerably.

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Really?  Really?   "People who say it can't be done should not interfere with those who are doing it."    Mirror: use it.   You make yourselves look extremely petty.

 

MIB

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Norseman, I do have to ask what evidence do you use to determine if there is a bear or a cougar in the area? And how do you know for sure without seeing one? Just a simple list of what you would look for would suffice. 

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First and foremost probably is because I've killed them there before. Which by definition IS a honey hole.

 

Secondly it depends on what I'm doing. When I had hounds the best way to tell if I had Bear or cougar in a area was a redbone named Amy baying on her strike box.

 

Another awesome way to tell if they are in the area is to plunk down next to a tree and start squallerin on a varmint call. With Bears you need to call non stop, with cats you need to wait longer before moving on.

 

But What I think yer asking me is what sign would convince me that Bear or cougar are in the area. Keeping in mind that they are known animals and not cryptids.

 

1. Sighting

2. Tracks

3. Scat

4. Hair

5. Kills

6. Shredded stumps for black bear.

7. Claw marks on trees

8. Open hillside digging for grizzly.

9. Calls, not very common to hear with either. 

10. Plants consumption such as huckleberry bushes or skunk cabbage

11. Dead carcass, not very common but found a black bear last fall.

12. Known habitat. Black bears like cool wet places. Grizzly prefer more open spaces. Cougar like rocky cliff faces that offer good ambush points. They like to attack down hill if possible.

 

How am I doing?

 

1 hour ago, MIB said:

Really?  Really?   "People who say it can't be done should not interfere with those who are doing it."    Mirror: use it.   You make yourselves look extremely petty.

 

MIB

 

You do realize this is a continuation of Gig's poll thread? 

 

Far Archer wrote:

"Amazing, as so many folks don't believe in these things, never experienced anything of consequence, and yet if we went further - many parts of the country have active populations of these things."

 

Thats a direct shot over my bow. That's OK, I'll bite....I have nothing better to do til after break up anyhow! :)

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