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Guest dHb

Ostman Story, One Of My Favs

34 posts in this topic

Ok, so how do you figure out what's with this Picture too then ??

It's a different Photographer, different Camera & Lense ( i'd assume ) and a different but simlilar location..

post-136-057095000 1311827329_thumb.jpg

I'll have a look for some more to see if i can shed some light ( no pun intended )..

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I recall seeing an interview with Ostman in the 1970's. Seems he'd gotten a little strange and his discussion of Bigfoot was heavily revolving around para normal aspects. After seeing that interview I've more or less dismissed Ostman in spite of the fact that his account is one of the greats.

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Yeah, here's more Vil..

I don't think there's any doubt now..

post-136-011734800 1311827643_thumb.jpg post-136-019133800 1311827659_thumb.jpg post-136-094950100 1311827677_thumb.jpg untitled.bmp post-136-009047400 1311827739_thumb.jpg

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I personally think the Guy got his locations mixed up, but if he says he made his way up the Toba then we'd have to assume he did..

Assuming this is true however,, i don't believe that he could be sure of being taken 25 Miles North/North East of the Toba by a Sasquatch ( he actually said 10 Miles in what i read ), especially with, as you pointed out, him coming out down by the Sechelt Inlet.

That would say to me that he got taken South/South East instead, it would also mean that Mt Baker would have been more likely with regards to visibility.

Anyway's, he believed that he had made 10 Miles or so from the head of the Toba Inlet in a North/North East direction when he first noticed disturbances..

He said he was awake for around about 3 hours inside the Sleeping Bag until they reached their destination & was asleep when he was picked up, speed would be unknown but was " going at a trot for a long time "..

He actually said he was awakened when he was picked up but half aseep, then said he had " no idea when it started as i was asleep when he picked me up "..

On his " escape " he made 3 miles in " record time " & then headed West emerging 2 days later on the Salmon Arm of Sechelt Inlet..

He simply must have headed South/South East whilst in the Sleeping Bag, towards the Sechelt Inlet but on the East side of the Jervis Inlet..

The distance from Ostman's alleged Camp which is inclusive of the 10 Miles North East he thought he made from landing at the head of the Toba, to the middle of the Salmon Arm is around 60 Miles..

If we are to assume that Ostman was taken South by the Sasquatch, then in 3 hours the Sasquatch would need to have been going at a pace of around 15 Miles per hour on average for those 3 hours or so that he was aware he was being transported, to be there or thereabouts & within the time & distances..

Who knows how quick a Sasquatch would travel " on level ground and was going at a trot for a long time "...

That's just a rough outline anyway but close i'd guess, to what would have had to have happened.. :)

I think I would have to agree with your hypothesis. It looks to me that then Ostman must have been taken in a south easterly direction for him to come out near the Salmon Arm Branch of the Sechelt Inlet and he probably wasn't where he thought he was prior to that. Of course, that's if the story was true.

Just out of interest, in J Robert Alley's book, when reprinting Ostman's account where he mentions Mt Baker, the author puts in brackets (Mt Churchill?). Mt Churchill is near the Jervis Inlet which is about 20/30 miles north of the Salmon Arm Branch.

Great additional pictures of Mt Baker by the way. I think there is enough there to show us it can be seen from a long way away.

*Edit. To remove link that doesn't work.

Edited by Kerchak
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Here is another picture to assist you in assessing the distance. I measure that the Vancouver City skyline pictured is about 130 km as the crow flies from Mt. Baker. Where I am at here is about 50 km away as the crow flies. Here is a map to help you visualize it. There is NO way you could see Mt. Baker from Toba Inlet, too. The green spot is me. The blue spot is the bay near downtown Vancouver where that picture is (part of it) taken.

vancouverskyline1.jpg

I've got no oar in this fight. I don't know how far away you can see Mt Baker from. I'm not even sure Ostman got his mountains right. But anyway, if Ostman came out near a branch of the Sechelt Inlet then he must have been already over 50 miles south from Toba Inlet when he spotted 'whatever' mountain. Was it Mt Baker? Or was it Mt Churchill? Or was it something else? Or is the whole story false? I have no idea. :wacko:

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I've got no oar in this fight. I don't know how far away you can see Mt Baker from. I'm not even sure Ostman got his mountains right. But anyway, if Ostman came out near a branch of the Sechelt Inlet then he must have been already over 50 miles south from Toba Inlet when he spotted 'whatever' mountain. Was it Mt Baker? Or was it Mt Churchill? Or was it something else? Or is the whole story false? I have no idea. :wacko:

It may have been Mount Churchill but that would have been right on top of him given where we'd think his location would have been & i'm 99.9% sure Mount Churchill would have been West of his location as opposed to Baker being South.

He did say he wanted to head West over 2 Ridges ( one of which would be in the vicinity of Tzoonie Mountain & Mount Jimmy Jimmy ) to get to Salt Water & juts beyond Mount Churchill is Jervis Inlet.

But getting accross 2 Ridges to the South ( like he mentioned doing & where Baker would be positioned ) would lead him to coming out at the Salmon Arm of the Sechelt Inlet which would be a little over 20 Miles, 3 of which he made in record breaking time & the rest over the course of 2 days....

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Well Bobby I don't know what the explanation is, maybe a fancy zoom lens combined with sunset atmospheric effects (mirage) or something but suffice it to say Baker does not loom over Vancouver and does not appear to do so from the ground (perhaps these pics are taken from a height), and even from up on a mountain adjacent to Vancouver you have to be very lucky to see it. Most days you cannot see it simply because the visibility is too poor. From Surrey or White Rock it is easier. I have to take a look at the pics on Google Earth that people have submitted. I see that there are a series of pics of Mt. Ranier from Seattle that are similar, and, again, Ranier does not loom over Seattle. It is some kind of zoom effect. I call that doctoring of a kind.

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Guys,

I don't live anywhere near Vancouver so I know nothing. I have no idea if Mt Baker 'looms' over Vancouver or if its a distant sight. I was just wondering how far it is possible to view Mt Baker (even as distant peak) while high up in elevation on a good clear day in the coastal range. I have no idea. :(

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I live in Victoria and visit Vancouver often and I doubt that Mt Baker is that close. When I view Mt. Baker from the Malahat it is visible but very distant, the Malahat is a little south of Vancouver and maybe another 30km's further west, But I just do not remember the mountain being that present in the city skyline, Vancouver is bordered by plenty of mountains, But Baker, I've never seen it like that before.

I've always considered Mt Garibaldi a possible culprit for what Ostman saw. If he were North of Jervis inlet Mt Garibaldi and Mt Baker would almost line up, of course Garibaldi would be far closer to Ostmans position than Baker.

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Well Bobby I don't know what the explanation is, maybe a fancy zoom lens combined with sunset atmospheric effects (mirage) or something but suffice it to say Baker does not loom over Vancouver and does not appear to do so from the ground (perhaps these pics are taken from a height), and even from up on a mountain adjacent to Vancouver you have to be very lucky to see it. Most days you cannot see it simply because the visibility is too poor. From Surrey or White Rock it is easier. I have to take a look at the pics on Google Earth that people have submitted. I see that there are a series of pics of Mt. Ranier from Seattle that are similar, and, again, Ranier does not loom over Seattle. It is some kind of zoom effect. I call that doctoring of a kind.

I'm not sure about that RE Rainier Vil..

I've personally taken Pics of Rainier from further North of Seattle where Rainier is incredibly doimnant & i can assure you i have not tampered with this at all..

Just look at how it really looms & look how tiny Seattle looks compared to it, figure out how HUGE Rainier really is under that Cloud with what is visible..

I took this from the Kingston Ferry Terminal which is 15 Miles from Seattle & more than 60 Miles to Ranier..

I'd say visibility plays a part in all this more than tampering with these Pictures

post-136-076133400 1311887185_thumb.jpg

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Guys,

I don't live anywhere near Vancouver so I know nothing. I have no idea if Mt Baker 'looms' over Vancouver or if its a distant sight. I was just wondering how far it is possible to view Mt Baker (even as distant peak) while high up in elevation on a good clear day in the coastal range. I have no idea. :(

Well to gauge, have a look at the Picture i just posted of Mt Rainier in the above Post that was taken 60 plus Miles away from it & with me with my feet firmly planeted on teh Ground at around Zero Feet above Sea Level..

I also took this of Mt Baker looking at it's West Side from 60 Plus Miles away, from a Boat..

post-136-018381800 1311888204_thumb.jpg

I personally believe that on a clear day, you'd be able to see Baker from an area about 100 Miles away..

However, as Adam said, there are/were other options & he just may have been wrong..

I don't see this as particulary relevant as i'm sure there wasn't a definitive sign hanging from it's peak last time i checked anyway.. ;)

I'm more interested in where he really was & the more i look at it the more i'm sure he would have been taken to an area close & in the proximity of Sims Creek, Ashlu River & the Upper Squamish River, much of which is not accessible by Car..

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Great discussion and excellent photos. Much food for thought. Again that 'Mt Baker from 60 miles away' photo looks close enough to touch. Amazing.

I'm more interested in where he really was & the more i look at it the more i'm sure he would have been taken to an area close & in the proximity of Sims Creek, Ashlu River & the Upper Squamish River, much of which is not accessible by Car..

Interesting. I've just been Google mapping that area and that's well worth a shout. It would certainly explain how he was able to come out near the Salmon Arm Branch just the next day after he escaped.

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I've climbed pretty much all the major volcanoes (including Mt. St. Helens before it blew) throughout the PNW. On an exceptionally clear day from the summit of Mt. Rainier in the winter I was able to see all the way to Mt. Shasta in California (just a little pimple on the horizon) and up past Mt. Baker and out to the Pacific Ocean past the Olympic Mountains.

Mt. Rainier, Mt. Adams, Mt. Baker, etc. are all MASSIVE mountains that are very visible from well over 100 miles. It is common for visitors to be blown away when I tell them how far away Mt. Rainier is from Seattle (.... "BUT, it's right there, it can't be more than 20 miles away....")... and tell them it will take three hours to drive there. There isn't a more humbling experience than to be at high camp on Rainier after the sun has set and the light becomes steely gray and the mountain fills the entire panorama with such sinister cliffs and ice.

It may be that Mr. Ostman was turned around in his estimates of direction after his capture, or that he misidentified Mt. Baker. However, I don't think armchair critics can discount his story simply based on his statement of observing Mt. Baker from a distance. Mt. Baker is easily seen from Seattle.

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I don't think armchair critics can discount his story simply based on his statement of observing Mt. Baker from a distance. Mt. Baker is easily seen from Seattle.

:)

Thanks you for your input, BFSleuth. Most interesting.

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I've climbed pretty much all the major volcanoes (including Mt. St. Helens before it blew) throughout the PNW. On an exceptionally clear day from the summit of Mt. Rainier in the winter I was able to see all the way to Mt. Shasta in California (just a little pimple on the horizon) and up past Mt. Baker and out to the Pacific Ocean past the Olympic Mountains.

Mt. Rainier, Mt. Adams, Mt. Baker, etc. are all MASSIVE mountains that are very visible from well over 100 miles. It is common for visitors to be blown away when I tell them how far away Mt. Rainier is from Seattle (.... "BUT, it's right there, it can't be more than 20 miles away....")... and tell them it will take three hours to drive there. There isn't a more humbling experience than to be at high camp on Rainier after the sun has set and the light becomes steely gray and the mountain fills the entire panorama with such sinister cliffs and ice.

It may be that Mr. Ostman was turned around in his estimates of direction after his capture, or that he misidentified Mt. Baker. However, I don't think armchair critics can discount his story simply based on his statement of observing Mt. Baker from a distance. Mt. Baker is easily seen from Seattle.

Hats off to you BFSleuth, you're my Hero.

& Shasta from Rainier is a LONG way.

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