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      T shirt fund drive   07/17/2018

      norseman has designed a t shirt and started a fund drive on custom ink. He is going to split the proceeds between the BFF and Project Grendel.  "We all owe this website a tremendous debt of gratitude. Our community and history would not exist without it. As far as the Project Grendel proceeds, I would like to see it go towards the purchase of a thermal scope."
      -norseman     https://www.customink.com/fundraising/sasquatch-hunter
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Guest dHb

Ostman Story, One Of My Favs

34 posts in this topic

I read Ostman's account more carefully. He would have seen Mt. Baker prior to dropping down into the drainage to Salmon Inlet.

I've made a pdf showing the view looking South by Southeast from the ridge between Tzoonie Mountain and Tsoonie SW3 (attached). This ridge is about 10-12 miles north of Clowhom Lake (which feeds down into Salmon Inlet). You can clearly see Mt. Baker on the horizon at a distance of 100 miles, which happens to be about the same distance from Mt. Baker to Seattle, where we can easily see it on a clear day.

Regarding previous comments that you can't see Mt. Baker from Vancouver, well I find that really hard to believe, since I've seen it with my own eyes from various locations around the Vancouver area. It may be hidden behind foreground hills, ridges, or mountains in certain areas, but is certainly visible from other areas. You can easily Google images of "Mt. Baker from Vancouver" to see many classic telephoto shots of the mountain hovering over the city.

If I can see Mt. Shasta from the summit of Mt. Rainier (about 300 miles) on a clear day, I think it is highly likely one can see Mt. Baker from a ridge top from 100 miles as long as you have a clear sight line.

Mt. Baker is an easily recognizable shape.

The idea that we need to discount Ostman's report based on the idea that you can't see Mt. Baker from that distance or that it is for some reason not visible from the area in question is a red herring.

If we are to assume that Ostman was taken South by the Sasquatch, then in 3 hours the Sasquatch would need to have been going at a pace of around 15 Miles per hour on average for those 3 hours or so that he was aware he was being transported, to be there or thereabouts & within the time & distances..

An experienced backpacker can travel about 3-4 mph at a good walk and gain about 1000 feet per hour. It seems that many eyewitnesses of BF are very impressed with their speed of travel, especially through steep and difficult terrain. I think 15 mph may be a pace that they can sustain for a period of time, even carrying a load.

Taking that into mind it really opens up a wide area of search to try and figure out where the hanging valley was that they had him in.

MtBaker.pdf

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the Ostman story is a Classic.

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Mount Baker from Vancouver Canada downtown

Check out this picture. 800mm lens compresses the view a lot, making the mountain appear closer than it is. If Ostman glassed to the south he may have been able to see the mountain from a decent elevation. Naked eye... No way. Is there another mountain in the vicinity of Toba inlet that could have been mistaken for Mt. Baker.

There was a member of the BFF 1.0 that went to what he though was the area. Never heard if he saw a mountain that could have been mistaken for Mt. Baker or that he could see Baker with strong binoculars.

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I remember being in grade 4 or 5 when I started to read everything I could get my hands on about bigfoot, and the Ostman story was always so intriguing to me.

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