norseman

Area X Presentation/ Bob Strain

73 posts in this topic

Good presentation, sorry I missed the event, I hear it may be set for August next year and thus I have a better chance to attend one.

 

Loved the size of the rocks heaved, that makes you think twice about putting somebody on the roof as an observer for sure (not to mention metal roof very slick, I have trouble with asphalt ones can't imagine metal. 

 

Does the property owner have a spare metal roof or roofer on retainer?!    Hahahah.

Edited by bipedalist
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I would help you Drewbot, if your heart was in the right place, but its not so I won't.

Besides your whole line of reasoning is kaput, concerning what was logged when or where. Wild populations of animals are not static, after all most of our terrestrial animals used Beringia to get here in the first place. Thats a long ways from Oklahoma, yes?

 

My heart has nothing to do with it.   

 

If it doesn't matter, then why did NAWAC include the incomplete citation, that the forest around them hasn't been logged in over 200 years?  

I think it does matter.  Because the decimation of our eastern forests was so complete, that even the elusive Bigfoot would have been rolled up in the catastrophe.

 

Yeah, well no one over there can find the paper either.

Then none of you are looking very hard because I googled it up in about 5 seconds. I think you all just want to cast doubt so therefore you do not want to find the study.

 

 

http://www.worldwildlife.org/ecoregions/na0412

 

If that is what you are referring to, that article makes no mention of the surrounding forest not being cut since the late 1800's.

 

Can you point out the place where it does?

 

 

 

 

Suite of Priority Activities to Enhance Biodiversity Conservation

•The most important areas in this ecoregion are under public ownership. Improved biodiversity management of these areas is needed.

•Identification and conservation of important biodiversity areas should be a priority.

•Continue major ecosystem restoration effort in Ouachita National Forest.

•Complete a land exchange between Weyerhaeuser and the U.S. Forest Service.

•Important old growth sites (from Davis 1996) include:

-- Blackfork Mountain

-- Clifty Canyons Special Interest Area (6.69 km2)

-- Turkey Mountain and adjacent slopes (4.04 km2 of apparently unlogged post oak and chinquapin oak savanna)

-- Cossatot River State National Park Natural Area (up to 8.09 km2 of old growth eastern red cedar glades and xeric pine or pine-hardwood forest on steep slopes)

-- Cucumber Creek Watershed (72.85 km2). The Oklahoma Nature Conservancy owns 6.07 km2 of this watershed, which includes some large shortleaf pine on the steeper slopes that are 51 to 76 cm in diameter and blackgum and hickory that may be up to 91 cm in diameter. Large sycamore trees occur along the stream. The upper part of the watershed has probably not been cut since the turn of the century.

 

I have no idea where Area X actually is so I don't know if this is about that area, but it is in the paper.

 

Also I can't find a date of publication but since most dates given in that study are in the 1990's, I assume "since the turn of the century" means the 1800's. I do not know for certain however.

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Have any suggestions been put forward as to why this spot is so popular with the wood apes?

 

If so where can I find the info. 

 

Thanks

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Thanks Airdale!

 

And yes Rockape - the document is pretty easy to find.

 

You cited an undated WWF web page as a scientific source in your presentation?

 

Were you simply attempting to give it the 'feel' of a scientific presentation?  

 

I was busting my butt looking for a scientific paper, and it turns out to be a web page from a non-profit group...

Edited by Drew
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There's a lot of black bear there even though the forest has been clear cut in the past, so there's no reason to believe that Sasquatch can't be there either. 

 

 

Have any suggestions been put forward as to why this spot is so popular with the wood apes?

 

If so where can I find the info. 

 

Thanks

 

The explanation that the NAWAC has always given is that there's a good amount of food and rainfall there. The forest there is also incredibly dense. 

Edited by OntarioSquatch
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Thanks Airdale!

 

And yes Rockape - the document is pretty easy to find.

 

You cited an undated WWF web page as a scientific source in your presentation?

 

Were you simply attempting to give it the 'feel' of a scientific presentation?  

 

I was busting my butt looking for a scientific paper, and it turns out to be a web page from a non-profit group...

Rockape is a member of the NAWAC? NO. Your crying over Rockape's non scietific source and then run back to the ISF and report that the NAWAC told you that was their source???

Who is misrepresenting what here?

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Originally Posted by Drewbot

So evidently this is the article that the NAWAC are citing.

http://www.worldwildlife.org/ecoregions/na0412

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Someone made a claim that the forest hadn't been cut since the 1800's.

The forum rules say that when you make a claim you should be prepared to back it up.

Why the drama?

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Good link and the video was chocked full of treasures of information that I may want to re-visit on a continual basis. Thank you Kathy and thanks Norse for posting the link!

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Martin,

Maybe this isnt so simple for some to comprehend.

I posted a NAWAC youtube link for the BFF community to peruse and enjoy. If any of you have any issues with its content I gladly encourage you to contact the youtube channel the video is linked back to or contact the NAWAC directly.........m'kay?

Thank you.

Edited by norseman
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Hairyman is in the video Norse

She is perfectly capable of answering questions.

I wasn't asking Rock Ape to explain why they used that improper citation in the video.

 

If you look at who I quoted it was Hairy Man

 

The NAWAC cites that article in the video 

 

GIqevJ.jpg

Edited by Drew
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Thanks Airdale!

 

And yes Rockape - the document is pretty easy to find.

 

You cited an undated WWF web page as a scientific source in your presentation?

 

Were you simply attempting to give it the 'feel' of a scientific presentation?  

 

I was busting my butt looking for a scientific paper, and it turns out to be a web page from a non-profit group...

 

 

One can and many often do, cite webpages in scientific papers. You can easily find that reference, plus many others, in the Ouachita Project Monograph found here: http://woodape.org/index.php/news/news/48-news/248

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Hairyman is in the video Norse

She is perfectly capable of answering questions.

I wasn't asking Rock Ape to explain why they used that improper citation in the video.

 

If you look at who I quoted it was Hairy Man

 

The NAWAC cites that article in the video 

 

I know whom you quoted.

i'll give you some sage advice as I was raised in the middle of the Colville National Forest.

https://fs.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsinternet/!ut/p/c4/04_SB8K8xLLM9MSSzPy8xBz9CP0os3gjAwhwtDDw9_AI8zPyhQoY6BdkOyoCAGixyPg!/?navtype=BROWSEBYSUBJECT&cid=fsm9_039806&navid=130000000000000&pnavid=&ss=110809&position=Not%20Yet%20Determined.Html&ttype=detail&pname=Ouachita%20National%20Forest-%20Land

Call the number and ask for the head of the forestry dept. They are the experts to whom you can address your question to.

Now? Can we have our thread back? We really could care less about your theory that "no forest 100 years ago equals no wood apes"........

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I still have trouble comprehending how an 18 inch dbh healthy black walnut can be whipsawed to break below bh? But large BF are said to be strong, just not seeing a chimp-sized fellow pulling that off.BTW guess which hardwood is number 8 in strength on the janka index? Granted a D-9 dozer didn't hit that thang so what did?

Edited by bipedalist
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One has to take into consideration the size and strength of some of the Sasquatch there. I've heard that some of the large males there are pushing 10 feet in height. Also, based on their running speed, they seem to be pound for pound stronger than any known species of ape. 

 

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Thanks Airdale!

 

And yes Rockape - the document is pretty easy to find.

 

You cited an undated WWF web page as a scientific source in your presentation?

 

Were you simply attempting to give it the 'feel' of a scientific presentation?  

 

I was busting my butt looking for a scientific paper, and it turns out to be a web page from a non-profit group...

 

 

One can and many often do, cite webpages in scientific papers. You can easily find that reference, plus many others, in the Ouachita Project Monograph found here: http://woodape.org/index.php/news/news/48-news/248

 

 

Thanks for the link. This one seems like a very valuable addition to the cannon of works on Sasquatch (or Wood Ape to you).

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