BobbyO

Olympic Peninsula Nesting Area Update

407 posts in this topic

Drift:    If you had been with me a few times you would be forced to modify your assessment of chance of Sasquatch being real.   Quite frankly not sure which of us is better off.  Even my relatives are skeptical of my experiences.   Strange that they would trust their life to me piloting an airplane but have to stifle smirks when I relate my experiences.     Such is the lot of a BF researcher.   

 

 

 

 

 

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So, does anyone know what's going on with the eDna sampling?  They raised 63% of the money they were looking for. 

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On 9/16/2017 at 0:06 AM, aether-drift said:

Personally I think there is only a very low (one in 10 million) chance of sasquatch being real and therefore my prediction for this latest testing would be that ..........

 

Hi Crypitic Fauna..

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Any word on this?

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 Not yet, things are still in the works as far as the DNA aspect. 

 

 Derek Randles and Shane Corson presented with an update on the situation at the international Bigfoot Conference in Yakima a couple months ago.

 

 We are still monitoring the area.

 

 This may have already been covered here as I only skimmed through the thread. 

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Hey Nathan, glad to see you found your way in real bigfoot county, and found a good team to work with in the Olympic Project. What does your time in the PWC tell you about the differences in the Midwestern and PWC Sasquatch behavior? Do you think that multiple varieties exist as suggested by a number of researchers? Anyhow keep us updated on both yourself and your work, suppose I need to check out your blog again!

 

 

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33 minutes ago, Lake County Bigfooot said:

Hey Nathan, glad to see you found your way in real bigfoot county, and found a good team to work with in the Olympic Project. What does your time in the PWC tell you about the differences in the Midwestern and PWC Sasquatch behavior? Do you think that multiple varieties exist as suggested by a number of researchers? Anyhow keep us updated on both yourself and your work, suppose I need to check out your blog again!

 

 

 

  In Michigan my data showed movement expanding from evergreen swamp forest into agricultural areas as the warmer months of the year ( the growing season ) peak, reports as of late September seemingly retract into river corridors that lead back into these coniferous swamp forests.  

 

 Out here in the PNW it seems that elevation and temps play a much larger role.  I am finding that from September to April the Sasquatch are staying fairly low ( 0 and 2200 ft ) in river valleys or at the bottom of wider watershed areas.   

 

 As the temps begin to rise the reports bounce between both high and low ( between 1000 and 4000 ft ), I believe they are higher during daylight hours and make there way down into the river valleys as night falls. There is a lot of reports along lower areas at say 2 - 4 AM at all times of the year. 

 

I will note that this is all based on a collection of my examination of report information and my experiences.   There is several factors that are messing with the data here such as unique terrain features that offer advantages or humans activity reduction during colder months. 

 

 It takes a person and a Sasquatch to generate a report.

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The only problem is see is that where Iam at is we get winter snow all the way to the valley floor that lasts for months on end. The bossburg tracks are a good example of this.

 

If all Bigfeet in an area bail off into the valley floors during winter where humans reside? We should be seeing alot more track ways and sightings than we do. In fact with very few exceptions we do not see this taking place at all.

 

So where do they go in winter in snow country?

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1 minute ago, norseman said:

The only problem is see is that where Iam at is we get winter snow all the way to the valley floor that lasts for months on end. The bossburg tracks are a good example of this.

 

If all Bigfeet in an area bail off into the valley floors during winter where humans reside? We should be seeing alot more track ways and sightings than we do. In fact with very few exceptions we do not see this taking place at all.

area

So where do they go in winter in snow country?

That is a really good question that, if the answer found,  could blow the lid off the mystery.        They either migrate or shelter in place, or possibly both.    Either one could lead to knowing a lot more about them.    My dream is to find a winter camp someplace.    Last year I was hoping to spend time during the winter looking for tracks from the air,  where there should not be any.  Hopefully find someplace where they seemed to converge.      But last year the weather in Western WA was so crappy with the record rains and snow,   there were very few days I could fly.    Just like mud,   snow holds tracks for a while, unlike dry ground during the summer which hides track evidence.    There have to be hundreds of possible shelters around, especially in volcanic areas.     I have found collapsed lava tubes, and if there are some of those, some may be intact, but just unknown.  If BF is as sentient as I suspect, they they may actually hide openings to their shelters, by rolling boulders or logs over openings.   Even bushes, or broken off trees, would hide openings and be eaisier to move.   Below ground,  while temperatures on the surface above may be below freezing,   temperatures in caves or lava tubes could be moderate.    They have had thousands of years to find these places.   

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9 minutes ago, norseman said:

The only problem is see is that where Iam at is we get winter snow all the way to the valley floor that lasts for months on end. The bossburg tracks are a good example of this.

 

If all Bigfeet in an area bail off into the valley floors during winter where humans reside? We should be seeing alot more track ways and sightings than we do. In fact with very few exceptions we do not see this taking place at all.

 

So where do they go in winter in snow country?

 

 I feel it may be due to a low population and moving into areas people normally don't spend time in the winter such as timber co land, protected watershed areas and winter road closure districts.   

 

  I have taken a few reports of tracks on the snowline moving down into remote valleys.  A couple where found because people where in an area that people should not have been.

 

  Below I have outlined the transitional areas from high and low elevation, when you compare to the BFRO data base you will see that not every valley has reports on a regular basis.   It seems to be very select areas have the year after year reports and those zones are near watersheds, winter closure areas and just undeveloped country.   A similar reflection can be noted over in the Blues.

WA Cold Map..PNGWA Elevation Map.PNG

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But most of the area within your outline recieves very little snowfall in winter anymore. Its not conduscive for easy tracking.

 

Sure, there are areas behind locked gates in valleys. But most of the valleys especially in western Wa are full of humans.

 

Try this on for size.

 

A male Grizzly bears range is up to 500 miles! And they do not attempt to make a living in winter time. They dig a den and hibernate.

 

If Sasquatch is foraging in winter? Imagine first its caloric needs. And then imagine how much travel would be required to meet them. And lastly how many footprints would be the result times how many Sasquatch are wintering in any one place.

 

There has to be another explanation, at least for snow regions.

 

Back home? What would Sasquatch be eating in cedar bogs to sustain itself for almost half the year?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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18 minutes ago, norseman said:

But most of the area within your outline recieves very little snowfall in winter anymore. Its not conduscive for easy tracking.

 

Sure, there are areas behind locked gates in valleys. But most of the valleys especially in western Wa are full of humans.

 

Try this on for size.

 

A male Grizzly bears range is up to 500 miles! And they do not attempt to make a living in winter time. They dig a den and hibernate.

 

If Sasquatch is foraging in winter? Imagine first its caloric needs. And then imagine how much travel would be required to meet them. And lastly how many footprints would be the result times how many Sasquatch are wintering in any one place.

 

There has to be another explanation, at least for snow regions.

 

Back home? What would Sasquatch be eating in cedar bogs to sustain itself for almost half the year?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 It is nice to have the chance to chat again by the way.

 

 I admit, I am only working the western side of the Cascades. There is just not much information to paint a picture with as far as reports go in central WA, as it is only the touch of the brush when compared to the Cascades and Olympics.  The Blues are the only data point to the far east that are reviewed for patterns.

 

  There are an estimated 1,900 to 2,100  cougar in WA and people are out specifically tracking/hunting them.  Cougar tracks are not easy to find, I have found cougar prints three times and I am not the smooth trail type of hiker.  We will be lucky if we ever find out there is that many bigfoot alive across the United States and Canada.

 

 You are correct, those areas are not good for tracking as snow does not hold and it also happens to be where there is more food if you are an omnivore.   The ungulates and other wildlife like to drop into those areas as well.  If there is good powder people hit open high spaces to ski and board, out in the wet zones these conditions just don't typically happen so really people don't spend time in there.

 

 The two areas that fit my bill both produce snow track reports, these areas are also where I have been spending most of my time this year and in 2015. In short, I propose that Sasquatch in WA don't typically live high during the cold months but rather navigate deep and remote river valleys in a circuit. 

 

 In Michigan every living thing moves into the cedar/spruce swamp forest, these areas are warmer, sheltered and very difficult to effectively move in ( for a human ).   The only people going into these areas in the cold months are trappers and hound runners, guess who my winter reports came from.  :)

 

 I think there needs to be a new thread for this, I did not intend to hijack the thread.  :mellow:

 

 

 

  

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I'm on it.

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There's been 4/5 non investigated (not by the big online groups anyway) sightings in this general area of the nests that i've seen over the last few months. Road Crossings. Not spitting distance, but within say easily a 20 mile radius.

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Is there any new news from the nesting sight investigation ... DNA results back on the hair or on the soil under the nests?

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