Midnight Owl

Native American understandings

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My theory has long been the prehistoric Indians of NA were the evolutionary pressure that put BF on the adaptive path to avoiding H.sapiens as a matter of instinct.  Seeing as we probably exterminated vast numbers of "others" in our history, this was a good adaptive strategy. It permitted them to evolve out of harm's way, but necessarily resulted in their other furtive behaviors.  It is also somewhat evident this adaptation is starting to become less and less useful to them and some of their secretive ways might be changing.

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1 hour ago, WSA said:

My theory has long been the prehistoric Indians of NA were the evolutionary pressure that put BF on the adaptive path to avoiding H.sapiens as a matter of instinct.  Seeing as we probably exterminated vast numbers of "others" in our history, this was a good adaptive strategy. It permitted them to evolve out of harm's way, but necessarily resulted in their other furtive behaviors.  It is also somewhat evident this adaptation is starting to become less and less useful to them and some of their secretive ways might be changing.

Given lack of evidence to the otherwise,  it is my guess that BF migrated to NA at the same time humans did.   But as long as there was contact, no matter where contact started,   there most likely was strife.   Certainly there is lack of skeletal evidence that BF pre-existed the Native Americans (I don't like that term) or evolved on this continent.     Since both humans and BF likely came out of NE Asia and crossed the Bearing Land bridge,   they might have been in conflict in Asia for a very long time too.    For all we know they got the idea to migrate from each other.      In this area we do not celebrate Columbus day because he is hated, but we celebrate indigenous peoples day.      There are no indigenous humans in the Americas.     Everyone migrated here, some just came sooner than others.    Columbus was actually one of the later Europeans to "discover" America.    

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I've related this on other threads, but I've seen (and cannot to this date relocate) a write up of oral history from an Eastern US tribe in which the great grandfather of the author, a chief who had been born before 1900, stated that bigfoot were much more plentiful before Europeans arrived.  According to him, they were hit even harder by European diseases than the human Native Americans were.  So hard, that for several generations the Native Americans thought that the Bigfoot had been completely wiped out.

 

Given the modern reports of bigfoot scavenging from dumps, dumpsters, and human habitations, I would assume that the contemporary bigfoot population is now relatively resistant to common human diseases, as are contemporary Native Americans.

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It could be that the European disease thing is part of the BF reclusive nature.     In reality the NA who live on both coasts had some exposure to European or Asian explorers prior to Columbus.  So that contact meant some antibodies may have been present and indeed NA could have had more resistance than BF living in the interior.     I have good documentation that my great grandfather was half NA.  Family records and that sort of thing.    He served as an Indian Scout for the US Army in Arizona.    But DNA testing does not show that.       Early American settlers talked of a tribe in the NE, where my great grandfather came from,  where the NA had reddish hair and beards.    I wonder if my great grandfather was actually a very early European settler that came well before Columbus and lived in a tribal situation before Columbus.    I have what is described as ancient Irish DNA markers.    That sort of thing really messes up the out of Asia migration theories.   

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On 10/11/2017 at 11:19 AM, SWWASAS said:

 There are no indigenous humans in the Americas.     Everyone migrated here, some just came sooner than others.    Columbus was actually one of the later Europeans to "discover" America.    

 

That is exactly correct.  Some people have this romantic notion that Indians were always here in America. Their lineage and DNA has never known another soil.

 

I'm native American even though there isn't a drop of Indian blood in me. 

 

It reminds me of The Honeymooners.   Ralph: “What do you know about golf?” Ed: “I’ve been working in the sewer for ten years. If that don’t qualify me as an expert on holes, I give up.”

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