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Incorrigible1

On the Plausibility of Another Bipedal Primate Species Existing in North America

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^ Yes someone posting here knew the guy, I think, one of the members that was in to taxidermy maybe too, forget his handle now, maybe White something. 

 

 

Edited by bipedalist
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On 11/1/2017 at 9:19 AM, MIB said:

Standing is a known, demonstrated multiple-hoaxer.   Meldrum and Stroud are taking considerable risk to their credibility in the bigfoot field associating with him. ......."

 

MIB

 

There us no risk for Meldrum. 

 

He has been wrong on many occasions and it hasn't harmed his reputation in the footer community one bit.

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How do we now look up members on this new platform btw, very perverse trying to do that now unlike the older php platform/!

Edited by bipedalist
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There are two species and two sub-species of gorillas. All are different in size, shape, features, habits, and exist in different habitat areas. Like humans, individual gorillas can be identified, one from the others, by their facial features and general appearance. One could expect to see differences in the Bigfoot from Alaska and those from the Gulf Coastal areas. 

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I’ve been keeping track of the physical characteristics described in the most credible reports, and have noticed that there’s a seemingly impossible range of certain physiological differences given the size of some of the areas (e.g. SE Oklahoma). The two most notable characteristics are hair colour and hair length. What makes it even more unusual is that the range of physiological difference doesn’t increase the farther the geographical range is. To many biologists, it would be evidence that the vast majority (at the very least) of these reports are either faked or unintentionally mistaken.

 

Edited by OntarioSquatch
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No.   A real biologist would also consider how far individuals travel.   Things like Bergmann's Rule fall apart when individual members of a species travel far enough to maintain a comparatively homogeneous gene pool across the entire population.   Species unlike our own which don't have a significant bottleneck in the population tend to have greater diversity than we do.  Consider chimps as an example.

 

MIB

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In the south, the different colors are black, brown, blonde, dark reddish-orange, grey, and white. Some with a reddish tinge, and some without. Some with long hair on their head and neck, and some without. So based on that, there would have to be at least 6 gentically isolated populations that have all only recently crossed and interbred.

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I wouldn't put too much stock in hair color variation.  We don't know if their coat changes color with the seasons like many other known animals.  We also don't know what variations exist between the male and female, young and old, etc.

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2 hours ago, OntarioSquatch said:

In the south, the different colors are black, brown, blonde, dark reddish-orange, grey, and white. Some with a reddish tinge, and some without. Some with long hair on their head and neck, and some without. So based on that, there would have to be at least 6 gentically isolated populations that have all only recently crossed and interbred.

Interesting take. I haven't seen the data you're using or your "report" but it does make you think.

 

I see where you're going.

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Nearly all of the reports have dates, so it’s just a matter of keeping track of the data. From what I’ve personally seen so far, there isn’t any hair color that’s exclusive to any particular season. I also haven’t seen any consistency across reports of juveniles either.

 

There are many other overlooked oddities as well. Others include geographical range, urban reports, strength to bodyweight ratio, speaking in a language using sentences, extreme distrust of strangers, reports of high UFO activity, and the lack of any novel DNA.

 

There are a number of researchers that are well aware of perhaps one or two of these oddities, but virtually zero that have extensive knowledge of all of them

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14 hours ago, JustCurious said:

I wouldn't put too much stock in hair color variation.  We don't know if their coat changes color with the seasons like many other known animals.  We also don't know what variations exist between the male and female, young and old, etc.

 

Well we know that they don't shed (otherwise we'd find hair, LOL) so they must remain the same color throughout the year.

 

 

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3 hours ago, Drew said:

 

Well we know that they don't shed (otherwise we'd find hair, LOL) so they must remain the same color throughout the year.

 

 

 

 There is a fair amount of data that they remain the same color year round.   

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