Old Dog

The whites of their eyes

4 posts in this topic

     In a recent blog I mentioned that of the 633 species of primates, man is the only one that shows sclera, and from that I proposed that Bigfoot was more closely related to apes than man.  In further reading I ran across an article by Melissa Hogenboom, a journalist with BBC Earth, that apes do show sclera when they look askance.  My position is that even dogs and cats show sclera while doing this, but the difference is when looking straight ahead.  While peering straight ahead, humans are the only primates that show sclera.

 

     So folks, what are your thoughts on this? 

  •  

ape face.jpg

human face.jpg

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ive read it is theorized that it has to do with language and emotion. Reading anothers eyes alone means something.

 

And that Homo Erectus was the first to display whites.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe it allows for better peripheral vision since the eye lids are further back on the ball of the eye? It may also allow a wider field of view without turning one's head. Think Patty here. She turned her head to the right to look at Patterson but even then had to rotate her shoulders some. too. 

Edited by hiflier
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, norseman said:

Ive read it is theorized that it has to do with language and emotion. Reading anothers eyes alone means something.

 

And that Homo Erectus was the first to display whites.

 

This from an article on human / ape sclera:

 

     "...

 

one idea is that the whiteness of our eyes is important for our social world. "This is why it was selected to become a robust trait common to all humans."

The theory, called the cooperative eye hypothesis, proposes that the advantage of having white sclera helps us to follow the gaze of others more easily. White is a more conspicuous colour than black, so when we fix our gaze to something, our friends can easily do so too. 

As we evolved, this helped us develop an almost instant understanding of each others' intentions, without speaking a word. 

 

3 hours ago, hiflier said:

Maybe it allows for better peripheral vision since the eye lids are further back on the ball of the eye? It may also allow a wider field of view without turning one's head. Think Patty here. She turned her head to the right to look at Patterson but even then had to rotate her shoulders some. too. 

 

You really need to see Jeff Meldrums theories as the the anatomical structure of Patty's head and shoulders.  Specifically where the trapezius muscles attach to the head, (much farther up than on humans) and where they insert in the back, (much farther up and wider than humans).  Think Drax from Guardians of the Galaxy, but much more over the top.  When this is explained and shown, then you see the PGF on a screen with high def and a really clean copy, it becomes almost shatteringly (if that is a real word) obvious.  The definition of the muscles and the movement leaves very little doubt that this is an actual living Bigfoot.  We talked to him last weekend about this and was blown away.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.