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  1. Truer words were never spoken. Do I think that conventions and Bigfoot celebrities cause damage to the larger cause? No. Do I think that these strange people who try to become self appointed gatekeepers of the topic cause damage to the larger cause? Yes. If they had their way, only ‘serious researchers’ such as themselves would be permitted to speak about certain things, and free public discourse would be controlled or eliminated. Bitter, self-appointed experts who constantly demand that others be quiet and bow to their wisdom turn away more potential enthusiasts than Mountain Monsters. And one of those enthusiasts might just be the one to prove Bigfoot’s existence someday. I used to rail against BFRO paid expeditions on this forum, until a couple of members were kind enough to take the time to explain an opposing point of view to me. Just because I don’t find any personal value in those things doesn’t mean that other people shouldn’t have the opportunity to enjoy them if they so desire. At the end of the day, it exposes more people to the subject, many of whom are not able to do what we would define as field research themselves. Real field research is hot, dirty, expensive, time consuming, frustrating, and sometimes dangerous. Just because someone can’t or isn’t willing to endure all of that, doesn’t mean that they can’t have an interest in the subject…even if the version that they are interested in doesn’t necessarily reflect my own experiences. When the shut-in on Facebook starts to lecture you on Bigfoot behavior…just laugh and move on. There’s too many windmills out there to tilt with, so why bother? And if you do argue with them and successfully impose your own viewpoint…well, congratulations. There’s only a few million more out there, so you better get cracking if you want everyone to think the same way as you. At the end of the day, the person who wants to pay to go on a BFRO expedition has absolutely zero effect on me or my efforts. Nor does a little grandmother who collects Bigfoot memorabilia. Nor does a Bigfoot celebrity who brings out his own branded ‘Monster Hot Sauce’. I personally find it a bit cringe, but people might think the same way about me. And I don’t want those people to have the ability to limit or control my actions or speech concerning Sasquatch…so I will afford them the same courtesy. The idea of subjective control of the discussion seems to be appealing to a disturbing number of forum participants these days. I went to the Smokey Mountain conference, mainly because I enjoy watching Paulides give his presentation and I wanted to hear Ron Morehead speak. I approached it with a certain level of hesitancy given some of the participants. I ended up having a ball. A lot of it didn’t appeal to me, but I enjoyed being there and talking to some of the attendees…even the ones who I find to be polar opposite of me on the subject. Enjoyed the heck out of it, and even ended up buying some Cryptid related patches off of a kid who had a table there…just because I found his enthusiasm for the subject infectious. At the end of the day, if you think that Matt Moneymaker and someone’s grandma who collects Bigfoot tchotchkes is going to prevent the eventual proof of these creatures, or if you find yourself bitterly stewing over their very existence…maybe reflect a little upon why you are allowing others to affect you to such a degree. At the end of the day, this subject and it’s pursuit is supposed to be something that brings us joy. If you find yourself hating the subject and everything or anyone involved with it…yet are still involved because you feel that you and you alone can solve the mystery…then I don’t know what to tell you, other than maybe request that you don’t constantly attempt to poison the subject for the rest of us. No one person is ever going to completely control the narrative. This isn’t the day of the Four Horsemen, were only a comparative handful of people were conversant on the subject. There are more YouTube channels and podcasts than you could shake a stick at…. Most of them aren’t my cup of tea, but I don’t have an innate desire to control what others say, hear, or do…so I don’t care. And if you do care? More power to you. I only answered because you asked, and now I will continue my day free from the worry that Matt Moneymaker might be out there somewhere doing something that I disagree with.
    8 points
  2. This past weekend my "brother from another mother" Bill and I did our annual backpacking trip. Usually we go into a particular basin and do bigfooting things. This year that whole area was smoked out by wildfires upwind so we stirred things up a bit. We hiked into Blue Canyon Basin in the Sky Lakes Wilderness. It is a broad, shallow glacial cirque in the head of the South Fork of Rogue River in the Cascade Range between Crater Lake to the north and Mt McLoughlin in the south. There was fairly heavy haze as we left town but it got better as we neared Blue Canyon trailhead. The trailhead is on top of a ridge. From the TH the trail drops steadily but gradually to valley floor passing one lake on the canyon wall and meeting at several at the canyon bottom. To that point the trail is heavily traveled but gets less traffic depending on which direction you choose. We headed east past some lakes under the back rim of the cirque. We passed the turnoff to Blue Canyon Lake which hangs high on the back wall of the cirque. (We came back to this trail and used it getting out of the basin .. more of that later.) On the way in we passed Horseshoe and Pear Lakes, climbed a low ridge, and dropped past Dee Lake to Island Lake. My intent was to camp at Dee Lake but we missed it ... out of sight of the trail. Though I had never been there I recognized Island Lake when we arrived. We set up camp at Island Lake, filtered some water, ate dinner, and went to bed not long after dark. Sometime not much later the wind blew what was left of the smoke out of the basin and we had a great view of stars, Jupiter, and later the moon. Saturday AM we woke up to this at Island Lake: ... no smoke!! NONE!! We got up fairly early but it was after 9:00 a by the time we had breakfast and broke camp. The day stayed clear, at least up high, but heated up a bit. We reversed course and headed back with intent to take a different trail up out of the basin. We stopped at Pear Lake for a while, then after a short walk, we stopped for lunch and a nap beside Horseshoe Lake: After a break we hiked the last half mile to the junction with the Blue Canyon Lake trail. At that junction, the fun ended and the work began. Trails within the basin were fairly level and more or less maintained. The Blue Canyon Lake trail was neither. The lake is about 2/3 of the way up the trail to the ridge but off a few hundred yards through some gnarly brush. There had been some maintenance attempted as far as the lake. It ended there. Also the yellowjackets, which had been noticeably absent, began there. We stopped about where we figured lake level should be and I bushwhacked to the lake. It was not a fun bushwhack. The lake was pretty gross. The water looked clear but the lake bottom seemed coated with a bright yellow-green plant layer. There were no obvious camping spots. I decided we should move on. The last 1/3 of the trail to the ridge, along with the Cat Hill Way trail which ran along the ridge 2.5 miles or so back to my truck, was littered with fallen logs and had a lot of impinging brush .. mostly huckleberry. That whole section was overrun with yellowjackets as well. I almost stepped in one ground nest. No stings, but .. close. From the trailhead, we drove back to where we had cell service, phoned home / checked in with Bill's wife and my GF, then drove to where he usually parks his trailer in hunting season and camped one more night to finish off the mountain house, etc. Good trip. No bigfoot. No tracks. No vocalizations (though I have not reviewed the audio recording from the night yet). No heavy "vibe" as the research area gets when they are around. Time to start figuring out something for next year ...
    8 points
  3. I had a good "Sasquatch Day" today, starting with a breakfast with 4 local researchers and wives in a restaurant for the first time in over a year, followed with an afternoon sortie into the mountains to check out a couple of lakes N.E. of Mission, BC. I arrived at the first lake about 3:30, after parking on the logging road and making a short, steep, muddy hike down a rough trail to the shore. I found lots of tracks on the soft mud of the beach, but all of them were human and dog, nothing at all that hinted of Sasquatch. I returned to the 4x4, and continued deeper into the mountains, on a much rougher stretch of disused logging road, with speed reduced to 10km/hr. due to deep potholes, lots of rocks, and a rather sketchy looking old bridge, but did not reach the second lake target, as it was getting too late for me to make it the rest of the way there, and still get home by the time I had promised my invalid wife. That one will wait for another time, when I can devote a whole day to the task. It was great to be able to have an indoor social gathering for the first time in ages, and as always, refreshing to body and mind to get out in woods for a while.
    6 points
  4. Little update from the 3D research tool I am working on... The actual terrain data from Google is now in my 3D application and I have a 3D model in a very early stage now. I will start from now on to fine tune the landscape to get a scene as it was in 1967. A lot of work is waiting but I am confident to find every information I need in this awesome database here and I am looking forward to verify the result with all the data from the work other researches. Here a little clip to give an idea what I have in mind...
    6 points
  5. BRB ---- three posts above is one of the epic posts on BFF. Thank you. I remember the time when the mere mention of this subject produced uncontrollable laughter and guffaws. Matt M. has single-handedly converted what was once a subject that people only whispered about to something everyone can discuss with complete comfort. People can discuss all aspects of how he did what he did, and that is fair game, but in the end he is a transformational person. Mega-kudos to MM. We all have our own talents and they each benefit what we're doing. Field work is only part of it. Sound and video analysis, analyzing database information to develop patterns, photogrammery, historical data input and so much more. I am honored to watch all this evolve before our eyes. The more we foster conventions, the more there will be competition amongst them. The more there is competition, the more there will be the drive for excellence. Rising water lifts all boats.
    5 points
  6. NorthWind and I went camping. No bigfoots apparently, but they're missing out! Gorgeous little lake below Diamond Peak. I'd totally live there if I was a sasquatch. Tested out our equipment and made a plan for next week's adventure. We will be camping at a site where two campers were visited in the night. It's a 7 mile hike in. Found my camping espresso maker! A true, indispensable luxury. Makes a mean cuppa joe. Sunset over Gold Lake. Smoke moved in from the Oakridge/Cougar reservoir fire for a few hours until the winds changed. Me trying my hand at fly fishing for the first time. The fish were quite safe. NorthWind walking with one of his dogs. So many trails, so little time.
    5 points
  7. This is computer generated. It was created in three layers which were then stacked one on top of another. 1) Background layer - nothing special here, any background without trees or bushes will do. 2) The fake bigfoot - its a computer creation. Notice that it is unnaturally dark and there are not a lot of body details. This is hardest part which consumes time, that is why only a few frames are ever shown. 3) The foreground layer - trees and bushes to make it look natural. One of the giveaways (not gonna give away all): The sunlight on the back of the creation as it moves.
    5 points
  8. Found a new general location that I'm absolutely thrilled with. I've been north and east of this location before but never there. Headed out early today and finally arrived at a place to park my car. It is very desolate and from the first step it just felt like a sasquatch could be anywhere. I'll be moving my trail cams here and getting more acquainted with the area so I can do an overnight. My goal was to get to a pond that is about a mile, or so, from here. Never got there today as the trek through a very large cedar swamp was slow and tedious. I was going left, then right, and then left...all to somehow weave my way through the swamp. I finally got through the cedar swanp then decided to head back and regroup for another day. Here are a few pictures of today's journey and hopefully I'll get a few more of the destination pond once I finally get there. This is my kind of place!
    4 points
  9. 4 points
  10. RE: Zana looks like Burtsev was a co-author https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/ggn2.10051 The genomic origin of Zana of Abkhazia - Margaryan - 2021 - Advanced Genetics - Wiley Online Library 1 INTRODUCTION. The local folklore of the South Caucasus region of Abkhazia records a “wild woman” named Zana, who lived in the 19th century, who was referred to by some locals as a female Abnauayu or Almasty: names for a creature similar to the infamous Yeti of the Himalayas and Bigfoot of North America, that supposedly lives in the Caucasus and Central Asia. 1, 2 Originally captured ... onlinelibrary.wiley.com
    4 points
  11. Just returned from scouting out a new area first visited a week ago. I left very early this morning so there would be plenty of time once through the cedar swamp (4 posts above) to poke around the pond area. It feels like it will produce and I will begin doing overnights. It was gorgeous all day and I was able to put up two trailcams along the way. The drive in: The trek in: The pond meanders left and right. Here it is from several vantage points: Two barely-visible ducks on the pond:
    3 points
  12. Interestingly, the couple who stayed the longest came by my camp the afternoon I had approached them and invited me to breakfast the next morning, which was the morning of the recovery operation. I graciously accepted, and they invited me to dinner the following evening, too. In turn, I grilled ribeyes for them one evening. Like me, they had a Bigfoot camper, although theirs was the large 2500 model. Mine has a framed color image of Frame 352 Patty inside, and a Sasquatch Country plate outside next to the door. When the man saw that, he told me that he was a member if an Anchorage group: Anchorage Sasquatch Searchers ......or ASS. He's quite the character. He actually cited a few reports that I'd never heard of for that precise location in Broad Pass going back to when the railroad was constructed there and transforming the wilderness in the early 1920's.
    3 points
  13. Yes. Loved this movie. Go watch it. If the bus story is true, the responding MIB were close on hand, and swooped in converging for the climax, only to shrink away immediately after spraying the evidence off the road. Practiced. That's the word that comes to mind. Routine. My red flag is access. They're going to control access to the scene first and foremost, IMO the bus would have never made it to the scene, it would have been stopped by someone dressed as state police for an accident blocking the road ahead that would be cleared up shortly. And that's why this random armchair cowboy don't believe the story. You don't conduct a routine professional cleanup like this, in less than an hour, without the basic first commandment of keeping the scene safe by blocking access.
    3 points
  14. Hi guys! You might also be interested in knowing that I was contacted by a fellow historic BF investigator in Ohio, Doug Waller, who had a strikingly similar account he collected from another local there -- attaching pic he sent of his book (one of 3 he's written, I think), and illustrations from the case. The Ohio case involved another accident scene which quickly disappeared, only the eyewitness missed seeing the cleanup crew (and there was a much bigger mess). You can find Doug on Facebook if you'd like to talk to him about the case, he's a pleasant fellow, and has been collecting these stories for some years now out there. One thing he asked when I talked to him was how far away and who is the nearest Federal authority in that area, because it would be unlikely that a state or municipal organization would have done the cleanup. The closest I could come up with was a few Federal authorities (FBI etc) located about an hour away in Augusta. Food for thought.
    3 points
  15. What’s the problem exactly? You are upset that someone who has a casual interest in the subject is going to a Bigfoot conference and is wearing a ‘Gone Squatching’ t-shirt? How exactly is that affecting you or your efforts? A broader knowledge and acceptance of the topic is bad how exactly? Or are you one of those people who feel like you ‘own’ the topic? You act like Jeff Meldrum said that he was going to stop being involved in research and is instead going to sit at home all day watching Finding Bigfoot reruns, or plans to follow Moneymaker around from appearance to appearance like the Grateful Dead. Like a ‘World’s Hide And Seek Champion’ coffee mug is some sort of crippling blow that will destroy all attempts at serious research. Sorry, but Inc’s description of you is pretty dead on. It’s odd that you can’t see how negative you are…without adding anything of substance to any of the discussions here beyond a constant level of complaining. ‘Community narrative’. What is that narrative exactly? You act like every well known person in the field is part of some sort of Bigfoot guild where they have to tout the party message. It seems like a lot of them just argue their opposing views most of the time. If I recall correctly, you have spoken about being zapped and having equipment mysteriously ruined before. There are researchers out there who would lump you in with the woo elements because of those claims and want you eliminated from the ‘community’. But, that’s different, right? Honestly, you just sound like someone complaining to complain…and, you kind of come across as bitter and jealous towards Moneymaker. He’s someone who I probably wouldn’t want to spend any personal time with…and he himself gets too caught up in the ‘I’m the expert’ mindset himself…but, unless I am hearing someone complain about him here, he really has no effect on me. Maybe you can help us understand your frustration. You seem to struggle with articulating exactly how these things that seem to occupy so much of your time and attention are negative to the rest of us and the subject in general. Perhaps address the questions that I posted above? I know that you received a better response to the same post on Reddit. That in of itself should tell you something…when the perpetually aggrieved on the armpit of the internet agree with you…well, that’s telling. Finally…you offered some sort of localized, community Bigfoot gathering to combat this problem with famous people that you seem to think exists. I assume that, if that local gathering becomes popular that it too would need to be canceled before the participants gained any sort of notoriety? Who is going to determine what level of recognition is acceptable?
    3 points
  16. Here's an audio clip from my annual 2 week campout a few weeks back. I'm going to tell you straight up I don't know what this is, but in being on this location since 2006 none of us have ever heard this sound before. It occurred 3 times during my long-trip, and this was the last time I heard it at 4:08am the morning of August 3, 2021. (Tuesday) One possible candidate from YouTube suggests it's similar to a bear cub, and the landowner suggested it's the close match yet after listening to it countless times, you still come away with just not really matching a bear cub. (At least not in any of the videos I've been able to find on the subject.) Our host/landowner ever says in all his years of being there, that's nothing he's ever heard before. So.... don't worry about being right or wrong, because short of hearing it again in the weeks/weekends to come when I'm back up there with my thermal to visually confirm it, I'm not committed to it being one thing or another, but I sure hope to get eyes on it this season if it happens again. I would note too, that 2 out of the 3 times I heard this occur at night, there was a river/water splash within a minute or so of the vocals happening, but not the sound of anything moving thru the water: just a singular, noticeable, pronounced splash in the immediate vicinity of the recording mics. 79787003_20210803408ambabybearorjuviBF20distinctvocalsbeginsendswithwatersplashShelterPOV10db.mp3
    3 points
  17. Negligible channel that has been producing bogus clickbait for the gullible for years.
    3 points
  18. Speaking of autofocus option..... Early last week, I went for a quick overnight. Using my thermal, I was able to see mice running hither and yon all night long. Late into the evening, as I was scanning the woods, I picked up something between two trees. It was moving while in place. A second, or two, later I watched a mouse run toward the unidentified object. Then, with a silent and sudden movement, the object leaped upon the mouse. It was an owl. I focused my attention on the black object that was about human height although I could not see any lower body. The angle was odd as the trees, and the object in between, was at 45 degrees. I assumed the lower body was being hidden by one of the trees. It never dawned on me an owl would be on a branch that low. I should have magnified the object x 4.6 then manually focused, then magnified x 9.2 and manually focused. I didn't as I was watching the object for every movement. When I watched the video on my 32" computer screen, it was clear from the start the object was an owl. You could make out the details of the head not readily apparent on the thermal's small OMELED screen. Oh well, a little fun that night and a lesson learned. I'll see if I can upload the video--my skills in this regard are sorely lacking.
    3 points
  19. Okay, a non-winter suggestion for whoever's interested. contact a local university zoology department by getting on the universities website and looking at the professors in the department. There will be contact info there for most if not all of them. Email one and see if they would accept a soil sample from you to test along with all of their other samples. Sometimes they will say yes and possibly offer to run your samples for free if you tell them you can't afford the testing. In a day or two you may have something set up. Take a piece of one to one and a half inch diameter PVC about 4" long and drop it into a 50% solution of bleach and water for a couple of minutes. Put on a pair of unpowdered latex gloves, grab the tube, or use tongs soaked in the same solution at the same time, and rinse thoroughly with tap water and let dry. Stick the tube into a baggie and take it into the field. If you see a set of footprints take the tube and pound it into the soil a couple of inches inside one or two of the footprints with the back side of an ax, put on gloves, remove the tube and place it into a paper bag. Just get a decent size stick on label and put some info on it, last name, make up sample ID number and add on the GPS coordinates.......you never know, but you may have a good idea of the results depending on the nature of the prints you found. Done. You now have a DNA soil sample plug to submit. This is only a suggestion. But outside of prep and time, it's cheap and easily doable.
    3 points
  20. Way to go Hunster. Another pearl in the folds of Bigfoot Encounters. 2 words........Bobby Short.
    2 points
  21. That was Titmus who was on site several days later and who claimed to track Patty for quite a ways........maybe a quarter mile or more. My guess would be that Laverty didn't have a camera when he found the nest. He was probably on the clock for the USFS when he stumbled upon it. Moreover, it may have been years before 1967. He had worked that corner of California for some 15 years or so. When they went to the PG site on Monday, 23 October 1967, it was specifically to see the site that they'd heard the filming took place. They were in Orleans for the weekend when they'd heard the news of the Friday afternoon filming, at which time they were probably preparing to drive out of the woods for the weekend. It would be no surprise that they'd bring a camera on such a visit. His nest find was mentioned by Bobbie Short, if memory serves me correctly. In the same reading it was mentioned that he also had a sighting or some other encounter near Hyampom. He was definitely interested in the phenomenon.
    2 points
  22. Thanks for sharing. Pariedolia and mechanical sounding coyote.
    2 points
  23. Some very interesting audio recorded here.
    2 points
  24. I know Thomas... He's a good guy. He sticks his recorder in a boot overnight and will listen to every minute of what he records. I can't do that because I have thousands of hours of recordings. I have to look at the spectrum graphs to find sounds. The foot stomps are interesting, but it sounds like a deer snort when it gets close. Thomas is on the right. That's me in the back.
    2 points
  25. It doesn't seem like how many parts, tools, and equipment I carry. "Stuff" happens: I left late for my moose hunt this year because the newer Argo I just bought wouldn't run after I ran it into my garage to pack it. There's some kind of bizarre carburator problem. I had already used it last month on a very deep caribou hunt; over 20 miles in to a VERY lonely valley. I was actually glad it broke in my garage and not out in the trail. I ordered a carb kit for it, then quickly prepped my old Argo for this trip. The morning I left home (Sunday, Sept. 5), the utility trailer that I haul the Argo in had a flat. Nobody open to repair it. I'm starting to feel a bit nervous. God might be telling me something, but I never seem to understand these "messages". Am I supposed to be determined, or should I call it off? I put the spare on and aired up the flat. It's a slow leak. It became my new spare. It rained all the way up to the upper Chulitna River area. I stayed in the camper all day and night Monday. Tuesday morning it was overcast and looked threatening, but it wasn't rainy. My camp spot goal was only about 5 miles in, but there were some pretty rough trail areas. A creek actually took the trail over for a hundred yards or so, and there were several creek crossings. I got right up to the ridge I wanted to camp on, but went past it a bit to the worse spots on the trail.........and broke a chain. No power to the rear 3 wheels on the right side. I got the chain unbound, but found that I'd left my chain repair parts and tools in the newer Argo. It was a wet 5 mile hike out. At least it was daylight..........
    2 points
  26. Pressurecook, I looked at your area of interest. Charming location with spots on the river like Devils Elbow and Deadmans Eddy. Nice. The Bigfoot Research Groups Forum Area has "West Virginia Trail Cam Project". gigantor has a thread "Audio Recording Set Up-field proven". Worth a look if you need to record for a week. The listed equipment may not be available but similar electronics can be found.
    2 points
  27. Great advice! My brother, two of his kids and I went hunting deep in the back country. In a wind storm and heavy down pour, we got a flat. We put the spare tire on and it was 2/3 flat. We were slowly limping along until we came to an area that there was 5 or 6 pickups driving around. We asked the people in the first vehicle if they had a compressor and they did. I was surprised. I didn't even know they existed. The next pickup came up and said he had one if the first one didn't work. Pretty soon we had 4 vehicles there with us and 3 of them had compressors. This was my brother's new truck's maiden voyage into the wilderness. After he got home he discovered that his truck came with a compressor that was kept in the compartment were the tire Iron and jack was located. Good thing we came across a truck with a compressor.
    2 points
  28. Great videos! What a beautiful area. When you were hearing woodknocks, did you woodknock back? Once can only wonder how that would be perceived by those who originated the knocks. Do you and Kerry have two-way radios by which to communicate when separated? That might be helpful. If things hit the proverbial fan, do you two have a means by which to protect yourselves? You're both prudent to be mindful about your circumstance as you have a five-hour hike back to your vehicle. No quick means of a getaway. Someone will get quite a surprised when they view the pictures/videos on that trailcam. Haha! I had to laugh when you mentioned the trailcam strap giving away the location. My new method of using camo paracord, rather than a strap, is so much better especially on a fir tree. It is invisible.
    2 points
  29. 2 points
  30. Date & Time - Sunday, September 5 to Monday, September 6, departure at 10a onto the trail. Weather - idk, maybe 80? Perfect temp. Some smoke from fires, some blustery wind in late evening, turning into a quiet night. Location- halfway to Klamath Falls, lol, up in the Cascade Range What Happened- NorthWind and I followed up on an experience report and I got to do my first backpacking trip overnighter! I've done tons of camping, lived in my van for six months, but never did this. Done! So, we hiked in to a small lake where some campers experienced supposed bigfoots around their tent in the night and some rock tumbling. We had a quiet night. No visitors, but i haven't listened to my audio. However, in the morning, fortunately after coffee and breakfast, we got activity. NorthWind had set up a recording of a baby crying, and they showed up in the morning, perturbed apparently. We got seven clear wood knocks across the lake from us as we took down camp. The seventh, which i don't think we got recorded :( ) was the loudest I've EVER heard. It was if I'd smacked a baseball bat as hard as possible against a tree. It echoed around the lake, and if a wood knock could sound absolutely pissed off at us and our crying baby, it did. We packed up and grabbed the recorder, and split. We got an eighth wood knock when we were out of the bottle neck, out on the exit trail - obviously they followed us, typically escorting behavior. They wanted nothing to do with us! They wanted us gone. I didn't record much because NorthWind is working on a video and his are better than mine. Cool experience! Our camp, below: The lake at sunrise. And no smoke on day 2, hooray! I solved that "no good instant coffee" issue. Works great! The recorder is to the left at one point on a triangle, the knocks were the other point, and our camp was the final point.
    2 points
  31. Anyone following this thread will probably enjoy "Trollhunter." Government sponsored hunters are sent out to clandestinely cull problem trolls. Real creatures (in this adventure/horror/comedy), not just the mythical monsters. The trollhunters use the ruse of "bear hunting" as cover story for their actual activities. I really enjoy this lively romp! https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1740707/
    2 points
  32. I hope that the stabilized clip of Patty in the opening page of the BFF website never gets taken down. Every time I watch it I view it at least ten times in a row and it never ceases to amaze me. The planting of her right leg right after the look back is so incredibly telling of her reality. That powerful plant ripples her entire thigh right down to her calf. That is an effect of pure muscle. Yes, it was nearly fifty four years ago, but I do think that it's what we are dealing with today. Except that it's not just us who are dealing with it, and even when we do, we only deal with it, for the most part, slightly more than peripherally.....someone else, however, is also dealing with it, and they have been dealing with it a lot more seriously than we have been.
    2 points
  33. Really only been to one conference, Honobia in fall of 2019, primarily to hear both Ron Morehead & Scott Nelson speak on what (to me) is absolutely the most fascinating aspect of these creatures: their language. It was riveting. To hear the Sierra Sounds played (as an opening to Scott's talk) at a really high decibel level, seemingly coming out of nowhere, you could have heard a pin drop in the auditorium. There were several other speakers, a couple of them pretty well known in the field, but one gave the strangest talk, could not stop recalling (over & over again, with a certain "amused" tone) an accident that left one of his fellow researchers injured and bloody. Pretty creepy. Of all the experiences he could have shared that day, (and there was one that I'd hoped he would, one which basically helped put him on the map) to choose that one incident was strange indeed. Very disappointing. But I digress. I think it's just being with like minded people who have some incredible first person accounts, (some of these from around the breakfast table) and I've learned that if you just ask, a lot of experiences you might never have heard start to come out. The rest of it was a carnival atmosphere, mostly for the kids.
    2 points
  34. Let people enjoy what they enjoy, as long as no one's hurt by it. We are all incredibly diverse, and our interests reflect that. At the end of the day, our common curiosity about those mysterious hairy giants brings us together. It's always interesting to hear other people's stories and see their eyes light up and their voices catch in excitement. Life's too short not to pursue what you enjoy, in whatever form that takes.
    2 points
  35. I want to thank you for bringing up pleasant memories. Throughout my childhood I avidly read a daily newspaper comic by Al Capp, "Lil' Abner." You remind me of one of the characters in the comic, Joe Btfsplk. Poor Joe was a notorious jinx and everywhere he went he was followed, above his head, by his own personal rain cloud.
    2 points
  36. What color is the sky in your world?
    2 points
  37. As being around a lot of like-minded folks who enjoy the subject of bigfoot. It would be a joy to talk about being in the field and how they approach it.
    2 points
  38. I had a VHF radio installed in my H3 today. A local shop supplied, installed, and programmed an Icom F5023H (50W power) with all of the BC resource road channels, so I can now monitor and communicate with the logging and mining rigs out in the bush. It's a lot safer when they know where I am, and vice-versa. They are required to call out km markers when they pass them, even numbers up, and odd numbers down.
    2 points
  39. As far as scenery and diversity in topography, such as coastal beaches, temperate rain forests, dunes, vast fertile valleys teaming with agricultural endeavors with farms producing grains, berries, orchards, vineyards, cattle, sheep and such, the Cascade Mountain range with dormant volcanos, high desert sagebrush flats, mountainous pine forests and tons of lakes, rivers and waterfalls, Oregon has it all!
    2 points
  40. Where Northwind and Madison go sasquatching is absolutely gorgeous. An eye for capturing that beauty is a real talent.
    2 points
  41. Picked up a very nicely made leather sheath for the Esee 4 from Jeffrey Karukes, trading as Zoney 59 on Eslay. Came with a firesteel and a loop to store it though the cerakoted blade doesn't work well for sparking til enough coating scrapes off. Also made a new one for the Boker which carries better and doesn't need to be refastened in.
    2 points
  42. As the photographer, I'll take that as a compliment. My favorite photo is this one that she took...WOW!
    2 points
  43. Wow! Come clean Madison, which magazine did you lift the picture from?
    2 points
  44. Sunrise over the covered bridge in Lowell, OR, on our way to camp at Gold Lake for a shake down test of our gear before next week's adventure.
    2 points
  45. That's all you get.
    2 points
  46. Here are a few pics from recent hikes....a larger print above and one that I made below for comparison, some fresh Sotol discards along the trail, and a Black & Yellow garden spider, which are huge, that I almost face planted....yeah I was looking intently at the ground for the dang snakes:)
    2 points
  47. Wynoochee lake area-Donkey creek Queets river drainage Kalaloch area Found one track that wasn't hoofed. Bear maybe coming off the bank to the road. No elk but lots of sign. Glassed clear cuts last night until the ocean mist rolled in around 8 pm. Access is tough. Timber ground is all locked up. Olympic NF roads are all grown over or kelly humped. But State DNR ground was good access and plenty of clear cuts. Made a big loop on dirt about 30 miles and then when we were almost out hit a road closed sign and construction. I wasnt going back the way I came. So I moved the signs knowing the crew went home the same way I was going. It was just woods to my back. My wife wasnt amused but we went through the construction equipment and popped out on pavemet on other side. I have a bear tag but its too warm in my opinion.
    2 points
  48. Wonderful photos of some truly wild country. My days of long hikes into the back country are about 20 years in the past now, so I'm glad others like yourself are taking those treks out there. I really miss those days, but now make do with 4x4 runs into the wildest places the truck will take me.
    1 point
  49. Two weeks ago, I spent a week in the High Uinta Mountains of Utah, camping and hiking with some friends. It is a beautiful area with easy access to high alpine lakes from the Mirror Lake Scenic Byway (Hwy. 150). While the trip was not a BF focused trip, I was fully aware of several BF reports around several of the lakes we visited. I also was aware of the claim by some Utah BF researchers, that the Weber River drainage was a hot-spot. Thus, I decided to take one my hikes overlooking the Weber River drainage and to follow a similar path as one of the BFRO reports (see link below). http://www.bfro.net/GDB/show_article.asp?id=188 In this report, two men and their 5 boys, claimed to have hiked to the top of the ridge between Pass Lake and Cuberant Basin at the head of Weber River drainage. When they reached the top of the ridge they looked down upon a small alpine lake about one half mile below and saw the BF like creature standing on its edge. While I don't know exactly where they were, if they were at the ridge above Cuberant Lake, that was about 11,000 ft and Cuberant Lake was down at 10,400 ft. I did not climb the ridge. Instead I followed the trail from Pass Lake to the largest of the Cuberant Lakes in order to see the Weber River drainage to my west and check out one pond and 2 of the Cuberant Lakes. Below is a map extract showing were Pass Lake TH, Cuberant Lake, Fish Lake and Notch Mountain are located. That morning it was 48 F at 9:30 AM and had rained all morning. Thus the dark clouds on the photos. It did not rain anymore until after 2:30 PM. The first photo is of Notch Mountain and the 2nd photo is an unnamed mountain. Both of these were to the west of our position and you can see the Weber River drainage down below. The 3rd photo shows the hike down from the pass into the pond on the way to the Cuberant Lakes. Fourth photo is the first Cuberant Lake and the 5th photo is the largest of the Cuberant Lakes. Overall the whole area is beautiful and I will probably return (with a backpack and to go deeper).
    1 point
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