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Risks And Dangers Of The Trade

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Guest adamsclimber

Two very simple ones come to mind: If possible, go with someone reasonably familiar with the area, not always possible but recommended local knowledge of terrain can be invaluable.

The second I'll just put down to common sense if you're eye-balling that slope, log, rock, whatever obstacle and saying "I can make it" but your spidey sense is screaming "Don't do it ya D*** Fool" listen to the spidey sense and rethink the plan abit before committing.

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Bigtex

Maybe this was already mentioned......but a trail or woods will always look different coming back through the opposite way. Always a good idea to turn around and look at the direction you just came from, and pick your area to do so that has memorable features that you will remember. And to those hikers (like me!) who like to hike without a compsass........watch out if some clouds roll in, and block your view of the sun.

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Guest

Good questions tracker.

If people are messing with my campsite, or there are people problems... it's time to move on, get out, etc. I think people that do that kind of stuff are crazy. To avoid that problem for the most part, never go it alone.

Something starts hunting me, time to change my own behaviors and access what exactly is going on. Shadowing me I do nothing, except try to be on the alert to make more observation.

As far as a 3AM visitor that's not human..it all depends on who it is.

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Guest tracker

What's your plan for the late night visitors that are too close and bigger than racoons?

I confront with my led light, noise and weapon. In my opinion it's already made the decision for you by entering your campsite.

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Guest tracker

Okay during the summer is easy enough to survive except maybe if injured.

What about in the winter if you have snow or no snow and you lost your own tracks.

What food and shelter/warmth resources are available in your neck of the woods where you search?

What if there's no snow but all the water is frozen solid and you can't break through for water or chips, what then?

Edited by tracker

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Guest fenris

Okay during the summer is easy enough to survive except maybe if injured.

What about in the winter if you have snow or no snow and you lost your own tracks.

What food and shelter/warmth resources are available in your neck of the woods where you search?

What if there's no snow but all the water is frozen solid and you can't break through for water or chips, what then?

1) Warmth, don't under estimate the cold and it's effects

2) When working up a sweat, DON'T, sweat freezes, read above

3) get crampons for traction and/or snowshoes

4) A means for keeping batteries warm, they die quickly in extreme cold

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Guest tracker

Hey fenris where have you've been ya old dog? :huh:

Where do you find water when everything frozen hard?

Here's one tip, people sometimes decorate their tree or house with them for xmas?

I throw in some more tips after some others have had their say.

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Guest fenris

Hey fenris where have you've been ya old dog? :huh:

Where do you find water when everything frozen hard?

Here's one tip, people sometimes decorate their tree or house with them for xmas?

I throw in some more tips after some others have had their say.

you melt snow......

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Guest

I hope and pray I am never in a situationlike this but having a SPOT, knowing what is edible, and basic first aid and supplies are the best thing going.

Another thing you may want to think about, know what emergency services are available in your area and the skill level of the first responders. Not all rescue are EMT's. Helicopter rescue may or may not be a viable option due to weather, terrain, or the distance you are from a metropolitan area. Usually only tertiary centers have medivac, lifeline or whatever name your state uses for flight rescue. Take into consideration the time factor it will take for responders to get to you and get you out. This can determine what supplies you need to bring and how much. It's no fun waiting to be rescued only to have someone less competent than you show up, it happens though. It's a good thing to know what the county you are in has to offer so you can plan for the worst case scenario.

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Guest tracker

Fenris, if you don't have a fire or a container for the snow how are you going to do it? with your wand Harry :D

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Guest fenris

Fenris, if you don't have a fire or a container for the snow how are you going to do it? with your wand Harry :D

1) Forethought gives you the means to do it

2) desperation inspires your creative side.....

try for number one

;)

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Huntster
tracker, on 11 December 2010 - 05:55 AM, said:

Fenris, if you don't have a fire or a container for the snow how are you going to do it? with your wand Harry

1) Forethought gives you the means to do it

2) desperation inspires your creative side.....

try for number one

Indeed.

I saw one of those "I Shouldn't Be Alive" shows the other day of a plane that went down in the Costa Rican jungle. All survivors were injured, and a couple of them intensely. They were found just two days later, but they were in deep doo doo for those two days.

What I was most impressed with was the fact that it was during the rainy season, and they were wet and shivering through the only night they spent, and nearly expired from hypothermia.

In a tropical rain forest, no less.

Another interesting factor to me was that at first, they were worried that the fuel from the plane would ignite and burn everything up all around. Then when the rain started, it put out the flames, and they had no way to start a fire to keep warm. Not a single lighter in any of their pockets.

Didn't smoke, I guess.

Well, neither do I, but I wouldn't get caught outside my home without a little bic lighter. Or my knife.

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Guest LittleFeat

Huntster - I saw that episode too and I was impressed by their lack of forethought and ingenuity. They should have been:

  1. Looking for additional clothing, food and supplies to use.
  2. Used the parachutes or tarps to construct a shelter that could be easily spotted from the air.
  3. Used the parachutes and tarps to catch rain water to drink.
  4. Get out of the tree canopy when the helicopter was searching for them.
  5. Have a more positive can-do attitude.
  6. Not leaving the two injured people alone while three of them left to find a way out.
  7. Etc, etc, etc.

It was a truly pathetic thing to watch as they sat around and did nothing to help themselves survive. They are lucky to be alive!

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Huntster

Huntster - I saw that episode too and I was impressed by their lack of forethought and ingenuity. They should have been:

[*]Looking for additional clothing, food and supplies to use.

[*]Used the parachutes or tarps to construct a shelter that could be easily spotted from the air.

No doubt about it, just a little bit of work could go a long way toward shelter, even if it was very primitive. They had no idea how long they'd be out there before discovery.

[*]Used the parachutes and tarps to catch rain water to drink.

Yeah, that was a gimme, and they didn't have a clue.

[*]Get out of the tree canopy when the helicopter was searching for them.

That one looked like a tough one to me. That was a pretty tall canopy, and I'll bet there was no open ground anywhere near.

I'd go with a fire to signal for help, with green foliage ready to throw on it to make lots of smoke.

[*]Have a more positive can-do attitude.

Yeah, they seemed ready to just die, and soon.

[*]Not leaving the two injured people alone while three of them left to find a way out.

Their biggest mistake. That was a death sentence for all. They were extremely lucky to have gotten out of that one alive.

It was a truly pathetic thing to watch as they sat around and did nothing to help themselves survive.

Lots is written and said about our education system in this country, but little is directed toward the complete lack of education regarding basic survival skills, edged tool safety, firearms training, etc for young people. Indeed, they might have been trained in how dangerous a bic lighter or a knife is, and that they'd be better off not owning one.

That's too bad.

Edited by Huntster

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ChrisBFRPKY

Indeed.

I saw one of those "I Shouldn't Be Alive" shows the other day of a plane that went down in the Costa Rican jungle. All survivors were injured, and a couple of them intensely. They were found just two days later, but they were in deep doo doo for those two days.

What I was most impressed with was the fact that it was during the rainy season, and they were wet and shivering through the only night they spent, and nearly expired from hypothermia.

In a tropical rain forest, no less.

Another interesting factor to me was that at first, they were worried that the fuel from the plane would ignite and burn everything up all around. Then when the rain started, it put out the flames, and they had no way to start a fire to keep warm. Not a single lighter in any of their pockets.

Didn't smoke, I guess.

Well, neither do I, but I wouldn't get caught outside my home without a little bic lighter. Or my knife.

I saw a few of those "I Shouldn't be Alive" shows and for the most part I tend to agree. Now I don't mean the poor guy that crashed his plane and had a broken leg etc.. It amazes me that you can take the "average person" out in the sticks for a few days and they'll die. No prior injury needed, if they're not injured, they'll soon cause one themselves for some reason? They can't build fire, so they freeze. They don't know where to find water if there's not a faucet in the woods. Can't figure out anything to eat unless they shop at a grocery store. You'd think at least a few people would still read about how to do this stuff. For the life of me I just can't figure out how someone can die while out looking for a Christmas tree. (And it's that time of year again folks, so be sure we watch for the tragic breaking news of the next poor sods.) Frustrating. :angry: Chris B.

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