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Bill

Ane Doc. "bigfoot Man Or Beast

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Bill

Anybody have information about the company ANE (may stand for "American National Enterprises") which produced the 1971 documentary "Bigfoot: Man or Beast".

I've heard Roger was somehow connected or affiliated with them, and they may have been the company that had the original film when it went bankrupt and the original got sold with other company assets. I don't know if these are facts or rumors, so any info would help

Side note: If you want to get a DVd of the documentary, a company called "Asylum of Oblivion" sells it for about $12 or so

http://www.asylum00.com/

it's listed under the "B" alphabetical listings of inventory

So if anyone knows anything about this company and the documentary, I'd welcome hearing from you.

Bill

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ChrisBFRPKY

Bill, I think Ronald Olson would know about anything you want to know about ANE American National Enterprises. I have no idea if he is still living or how to contact him. The only reason I know he had anything to do with ANE is because of his movie "Sasquatch, the Legend of Bigfoot" it was one of my favorites of the 70's. When looking thru his background info I learned ANE was his family's business and he had been around Roger Patterson some. Chris B.

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parnassus

Anybody have information about the company ANE (may stand for "American National Enterprises") which produced the 1971 documentary "Bigfoot: Man or Beast".

I've heard Roger was somehow connected or affiliated with them, and they may have been the company that had the original film when it went bankrupt and the original got sold with other company assets. I don't know if these are facts or rumors, so any info would help

Side note: If you want to get a DVd of the documentary, a company called "Asylum of Oblivion" sells it for about $12 or so

http://www.asylum00.com/

it's listed under the "B" alphabetical listings of inventory

So if anyone knows anything about this company and the documentary, I'd welcome hearing from you.

Bill

Bill,

thanks for the info.

contact Peter Byrne, he seems to have been around when the assets were auctioned off.

ANE was a Salt Lake City concern, their assets were bought by Peregrine Entertainment, which was bought by Century Group of LA. They went under in 1996. Their assets were auctioned off in Florida, but the assets were in LA; the PGF was not found among them. There is a whole legal history as well, Patterson selling them rights he didn't own, being sued by Dahinden, etc, but I don't think you are interested in that part of it. I don't think there is any evidence that ANE ever had the original PGF, or that they made the 96 minute feature film to which I think you are referring. According to DeAtley, they only bought the rights to Patterson's 96 minute long film, which was financed by DeAtley and made by Patterson and a friend of DeAtley. ANE made many copies of that film. So if anyone did ever find the films owned by ANE, I'd imagine they are several generations worse than what you have.

[This material obtained in moments via the index of the fine resource "The Making of Bigfoot," by Greg Long, 2004] :o

Edited by parnassus

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Bill

Paranassus:

I guess Long is wrong.

Dahinden is in the movie, as is John Green, and it is professionally produced by ANE, not Roger and DeAtley.

And it pre-dates any dispute between Dahniden and Mrs. Patterson.

Bill

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parnassus

Bill,

. I don't think there is any evidence that ANE ever had the original PGF, or that they made the 96 minute feature film to which I think you are referring.

It may be a different film, as I implied.... :D I look forward to seeing it.

I hope the info was helpful, and probably correct?

Edited by parnassus

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Bill

Paranassus:

It's ANE's "Bigfoot Man or Beast" No confusion. And it has a "re-enactment" of actors pretending to be Roger and Bob Gimlin with a pack horse going down a hill slope, before one segment of the real PGF Roger with pack horse segment. So it's not anything Roger produced.

And Roger never did an interview with Janos Prohaska which is in the program.

So ANE made it.

Bill

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Bill

Chris:

"Bill, I think Ronald Olson would know about anything you want to know about ANE American National Enterprises. I have no idea if he is still living or how to contact him. The only reason I know he had anything to do with ANE is because of his movie "Sasquatch, the Legend of Bigfoot" it was one of my favorites of the 70's. When looking thru his background info I learned ANE was his family's business and he had been around Roger Patterson some. Chris B."

Thanks for the ideas. I'll have to take a look at the "Sasquatch" movie if there's a connection with ANE.

I'll keep the Ronald Olsen connection on hand in case I can trace anything on him.

Bill

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roguefooter

Ron Olson died early this year.

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Guest

Well I just got back from my elk trip (successful I might add) and come to this thread as I'm re-entering civilization and seeing what's going on in the field. Wish I were still in the woods, but we came home early...

Ron Olson is an acquaintance of mine. First met he and his dad at his North American Wildlife Research (NAWR) office in Eugene when I moved to Oregon back in 81, which was after I had my first encounter. I then even briefly attempted unsuccessfully to help raise funds for his next planned film (not bigfoot related) that he was trying to develop. As far as I know, Ron is in good health Roguefooter. I suspect you are thinking of Ed Ragozzino, who was the Director of 'Sasquatch, the Legend of Bigfoot' who died back in February.

I've been meaning to drop by and say hi again to Ron. Bill if there are any questions you would like asked, I could add them to some I've wanted to. (Some are probably the same). I did ask him a few about the PGF the year before last and he affirmed that he had no knowledge of its location, and that other ANE assets were divvied up by the lawyers in Florida. Ron never got to see a sasquatch himself but he knew they were out there. Ron was also a close acquaintance of Roger P. and did field interviews for him, and according to Ron as he told me (and others), he was at Roger's deathbed and told by Roger that the PGF was real as well.

As for "Bigfoot Man or Beast", that's definitely a must see for sure as it has some great interviews of key historical figures in it like Fred Beck and Albert Ostman. I'd never chatted with Ron about it, but I will now for sure. It would seem Ron did a cameo in the film and ANE did produce it. ANE did belong to Ron's dad and those assets were sadly auctioned off, so unfortunately it seem much has been lost. :(

Here is a short opening Youtube excerpt of the film I came across. Very 70's for sure but a gem.

http://kdrama.brunei.fm/video_i3rRL3XWE0s&feature=youtube_gdata_player.html

Dave

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Bill

Driftmark:

I think what you posted is another movie, not the one I'm referring to. I don't recognize any of the first frame images of the segments you posted.

Weird, that it has the same title.

Bill

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Guest

I posted this on the old BFF, but I can't locate the name of the source. It was from a movie reviewer who dug up some background on this film.

BIGFOOT: MAN OR BEAST? (1971)

Director: Lawrence Crowley ; Hosts/Narrators: J. English Smith, Phil Tonken; Screenplay: Lawrence Crowley; Music: unknown; Production: American National Enterprises

DVD-R

There’s a mystery here. And while it’s certainly not in competition with a mystery like Bigfoot, it is perplexing. Bigfoot: Man or Beast? has a copyright of 1971 clearly present on the opening titles. About 20 minutes in, the film switches over to another Bigfoot movie, the 75 minute In Search of Bigfoot, the opening titles of which have been deleted. It has a copyright of 1975 clearly displayed on the end titles. The IMDb lists these as separate films and they are available separately but how could a 1971 film have had a 1975 film tacked onto it when originally released? There’s something strange going on.

Here’s part of the answer to the mystery. Ron Olson, a Bigfoot researcher who is featured in Bigfoot: Man or Beast?, had a family connection to American National Enterprises (ANE), the producers of the film: Olson’s father was part-owner of the company. Ron convinced his father to produce the first Bigfoot documentary, the 20 minute film we see here. I suspect that after In Search of Bigfoot was made, ANE made a deal with the producers of that film, Bostonia Films, to splice the two together for television or theatrical release.

But on to the film as we know it today. The host of Bigfoot: Man or Beast?, J. English Smith, is camped out with some Bigfoot researchers and he introduces us to Ron Olson. Ron drives a horrendously noisy, polluting tractor-type vehicle which no doubt scared away every critter in the forest, Bigfoot included, for miles around. Way to think, Ron. No wonder you never found Bigfoot.

Next we hear from various eyewitnesses including Fred Beck, whose hunting troop was attacked be several Bigfoot, and the infamous Albert Ostman, who claimed to have been kidnapped by a family of the hairy beasts. There are segments with researchers John Green, Richard Grover (who relays the “ Fife Heights incidentâ€), Rene Dahinden, and the ever-popular Grover Krantz.

Then we hear an “approximation†of Bigfoot cries before University of British Columbia professor Dr. Charles Guiguet puts the kibosh to all these monster sightings as folklore.

We get a nice long look at the Patterson film and then a short—but interesting because it exists—interview with famed stuntman and gorilla imitator Janos Prohaska. Prohaska was on many television shows and a few movies inside a gorilla suit before he and his son were killed in a plane crash in 1974.

Then, of course, we go into In Search of Bigfoot, the camping movie with Robert Morgan, a review of which you can read here. It’s worth tracking down Bigfoot: Man or Beast? for the original 20 minutes because of some unique segments seen nowhere else and because it was the first to go where many would follow.

IN SEARCH OF BIGFOOT (1975)

Director: Lawrence Crowley , William F. Miller; Narrator: Phil Tonken; Music: unknown; Production: Bostonia Films

DVD-R

72 minutes of watching people camp isn’t my idea of fun and that’s just what In Search of Bigfoot is, a filmed research expedition led by Robert W. Morgan, an intrepid, unlikable little fellow. Morgan claims to have seen Bigfoot in 1957 and has been searching ever since. This time we join him for what results in a less than satisfying experience for all involved-especially us, the viewers.

Morgan, who narrated another pseudo-documentary, UFO: Exclusive, and who died in 1998 without ever finding Bigfoot, gathered an experienced entourage of scientists, naturalists, and trackers together for a three month stint in the forests of Washington state. He gives a little pep talk to his troops at the beginning saying things like “I may be wrong in what I do but it’s all for one purpose: to get the job done.†And wrong he is in almost all of his decisions, except the one to quit and go home.

Somehow, Morgan finagled corporate sponsorship for the expedition, caging three new Toyota Land Cruisers and a motor home for his HQ. Between footage of wild critters in the woods and scenic views of Mt. St. Helens before she blew, various members of the crew pick flowers and berries and trek around trying to pick up the trail of a Bigfoot, but to no avail. They send one guy out alone for five days and he comes back saying that he might have found a footprint.

Morgan, the narrator tells us, is “tough because he has to be†and he’s convinced there are one or more Bigfoot families in the area. Why? We’re never told but I suspect it was to keep the film going. At one point, Morgan meets up with Swiss researcher Rene Dahinden and writer John Green who are looking for Bigfoot as well. The dislike Dahinden has for Morgan is palpable. Dahinden says you have to be cynical and ruthless and the only way to prove Bigfoot’s existence is to bring one back dead or alive. And he’s right. But Morgan talks about how the kids of “today†have had enough of killing and such. Dahinden makes mince meat out of him.

There are also a couple of excruciating interviews with locals who saw Bigfoot. One is a lady who claims to have made friends with a young Bigfoot when she was a child and the other is a couple who heard Bigfoot outside their house. I guess people that live in the sticks, no matter what part of the country they reside in, all talk like they come from Mississippi .

Also startling, but for different reasons, is the footage of the logging going on in the forest. It is even more disturbing now because we all know it has never abated even to this day, chewing up the forests for profit at an alarming rate.

In hilariously bad taste is the sequence where one of the female members of the expedition takes a tantalizing swim under a waterfall. This is just to kill time since Morgan has gone off with another guy and left the film crew behind because it’s too risky. So who comes back with an injury? Why, the “experienced woodsman†Morgan, of course. Earlier, the cocky Morgan had misjudged the distance of a peak, and the effort it would take to reach it, so it was practically dark when he finally got there with just enough time to look around and start back to camp.

Finally, a nearby forest fire puts the kibosh on the expedition. For some reason, Sam Melville, star of “The Rookies†TV series at the time, shows up to console the distraught Morgan. After three months, all we get is a couple of suspect sightings and some vague evidence. Thanks, Bob !

I can’t recommend In Search of Bigfoot. Not only is it boring but there’s no payoff. I might also mention that the uncredited score consists of an annoying ditty played over and over again and it will stick in your head if you’re not careful. For completists only.

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Bill

GF:

Thanks for the info.

The source I referenced, Asylum, sells the full correct 1971 documentary, without any of the theatricalized fluff you mentioned.

Bill

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