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Roger Patterson: The Good & The Bad.


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xspider1

So, Opal clearly saw the "black suit" in her trunk huh? Do the editors of such trailers/movies even consider what their witnesses are saying?? Methinks not.

:mda:

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kitakaze

In Long's book she describes it as brownish-black. Here she said black. Gotcha, nefarious colluder!

Bigopal.jpg

Patterson could have also bartered his invention with Paxton for helping with his book.

As Kit posted in another thread:

Paxton helped Patterson out with money. Paxton vouched for Patterson and tells Swanson to help him out. Paxton then has a brand new patent and trademark for what Patterson said he invented. Sounds pretty plausible to me and the likely scenario.

According to Kit: Patterson copied an invention prior to any record of Paxton inventing it? Patterson copied a company name that hadn't even existed yet? Kit calls this scenario "the truth". If it's the truth then there should be something tangible to back it up.

I'll gladly concede if he provides evidence to show that Patterson made a false claim about his invention and swiped a company name, but so far the evidence doesn't suggest that at all.

In relevance to this thread, we'll call the smear campaign against Patterson "The Ugly".

First of all, I'm not claiming Patterson stole Paxton's invention. I said Patterson's inspiration for Prop Lok was Paxton's Kwik Lok. There's nothing wrong with that. What he did do was claim to Green and Dahinden that he was the inventor of Paxton's plastic bread bag clip. He did not.

This is Floyd Paxton...

history-1.png

This is Kwik Lok HQ in 1965...

history-2.png

This is how he invented the bread bag clip...

Created from a need, the small Kwik Lok closure has grown into a international company that now closes billions of bags every year. In 1952 Floyd Paxton, Kwik Lok's Founder, whittled the 'first' Kwik Lok out of a piece of plastic while flying home from a business trip to the Pacific Northwest. Mr. Paxton's business was manufacturing box nailing machines – his father's (Hale Paxton) invention.

America was coming out of the war period and industries across the nation were undergoing change. Mr. McGuire had yet to utter those famous words in the movie The Graduate ...â€Plasticsâ€.

Floyd Paxton knew wooden produce boxes were going to be replaced by cardboard cartons and he was determined to find a new idea. While visiting the apple packing houses in Washington State, Mr. Paxton was introduced to a new form of packaging – the polyethylene bag. The poly bag showed a lot of promise but had a problem, the closing method. Mr. Paxton had an idea and the Kwik Lok Bag Closure began to take form in his mind. Back home in Riverside, California, Mr. Paxton began to turn his simple idea into its finished form.

Shipping the new bag closures from Riverside, California, was not feasible and the bag closing operation was moved to Yakima, Washington. Packing houses around the state soon began buying and using the small idea and Kwik Lok Corporation began producing the closures in a small building located in downtown Yakima.

In the early 60's two men working for Kwik Lok had another idea. Jeri Irwin, a machine designer, and Ted Marquis, Kwik Lok's Sales Manager, began their own company, Commodity Packaging. The new company developed a different type of automatic bagging machine for the baking industry. Commodity Packaging was eventually bought by AMF, Inc and Jeri Irwin and Ted Marquis went on to start two new companies; Irwin Research and Development and Marq Packaging. As the decade of the 70's emerged, Mr. Paxton’s small idea had had contributed to the growth of other companies in Yakima. The demand for the Kwik Lok closure continued to grow, requiring Kwik Lok to expand the manufacturing capacity in the United States. Today Kwik Lok is manufacturing closures in two plants in the United States, with other plants in Canada, Ireland, Australia and Japan.

Kwik Lok's story stands as testimony to the Free Market – a small piece of plastic and the mind of one man had fostered the development of thousands of new jobs and opportunities.

http://www.kwiklok.c...lok-history.php

Paxton was a Yakima entrepeneur and inventor as was his father. He did not have a history for taking credit for the work of others. Patterson did...

http://orgoneresearc...n-Patterson.jpg

http://orgoneresearc...r-Patterson.jpg

Here again is Patterson's Volkswagen with the Prop Lock ad...

bfvolks.jpg

I was correct in thinking that the cameraman was John Green and this was from his and Dahinden's Feb '67 visit to Patterson in which he claimed to have invented the plastic bread bag clip...

http://3.bp.blogspot...kswagen+van.bmp

Edited by kitakaze
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kitakaze

The OP staked a claim that Patterson is Bad because he "stole" inventions and "swindled" people to publish his book. Now it seems the OP itself is questionable for firing away without the facts. Thanks to the efforts of roguefooter we can see that the relationships of Patterson, Paxton, Swanson, etc. were friendly and cooperative. Bartering was likely part of the story and certainly time lines can be established with the inventions.

Not much mud here folks, move along. The wall looks pretty clean.

Swanson was friendly with Patterson until Patterson swindled him for his service and stole the books he printed unpaid for.

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roguefooter

Given that Paxton originally manufactured box nailing machines they certainly wouldn't have been called "Kwik Lok", which wasn't even developed yet. The government document shows Kwik Lok's first use of the name to be April of 1969- well after Patterson's Prop Lok.

The website history apparently leaves out other company names and none of it correlates with the filing documents.

Given how generous Paxton was with Patterson I'd say there was more to the story than we know. He definitely would not have allowed Patterson to run around advertising a stolen idea- there had to have been something mutual between the two. The government filing documents are the only tangible evidence we have, and they don't support any story of Patterson stealing anything.

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kitakaze

Paxton's bread clip patent was filed in April 1967...

http://www.freepatentsonline.com/3417912.pdf

It was invented in the 50's and had been in wide use by the time Green and Dahinden visited Patterson in Feb '67 when Roger claimed he invented it. Green thought it absurd. Patterson clearly based his Prop Lock off of Paxton's invention, which, again, is nothing wrong. What Patterson did do was take credit for the work of others as he did with Paxton, with Kunstler, and with Glanzman.

The Kwik Lok corporation was founded in 1954...

http://investing.businessweek.com/research/stocks/private/snapshot.asp?privcapId=4608840

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SweatyYeti

Let me know when the dirt piles up high enough to solve the PGF. Thx.

Incorrigible 1 wrote:

I think they made a movie or two out of this. I Spit On Your Grave.

Well said.....Giganto, and Inc... :)

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kitakaze

...What do bread clips have to do with the Patterson-Gimlin film?

This thread is about Roger Patterson. We are currently discussing his claim to John Green to have invented the plastic bread clip.

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roguefooter

Paxton's bread clip patent was filed in April 1967...

http://www.freepaten...com/3417912.pdf

It was invented in the 50's and had been in wide use by the time Green and Dahinden visited Patterson in Feb '67 when Roger claimed he invented it. Green thought it absurd. Patterson clearly based his Prop Lock off of Paxton's invention, which, again, is nothing wrong. What Patterson did do was take credit for the work of others as he did with Paxton, with Kunstler, and with Glanzman.

The Kwik Lok corporation was founded in 1954...

http://investing.bus...ivcapId=4608840

I just spoke with the Kwik Lok company and a guy who worked there for 33 years said the website history was based off of assumed facts- no documentation. It was based on unverified information handed down over time. He said that Floyd was manufacturing nailing machines in the beginning and that he only assumed they were called Kwik Lok back then. He had heard that Paxton invented the clip way back in the 50's, so he assumed they were called Kwik Lok because he knew of no other name. He was unaware of the name filing date in 1969.

Like I said before- the documents are the only tangible evidence we have in regards to this. We don't know how long Patterson and Paxton knew each other. We also don't know the business relationship that they had. We do not know what was based off of what, and to assume or even imply that Patterson stole or copied anything is completely misleading and false.

...What do bread clips have to do with the Patterson-Gimlin film?

It's not about the bread clips, it's the assumptions that are being made in relation to Patterson. It's an example of how things are being done and then proclaimed as being "the truth".

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kitakaze

Rogue, where am I saying Patterson actually stole something, invention or otherwise, from Floyd Paxton?

Patterson did steal from people, but as far as I know, Paxton was not one of them. He stole from Paxton's friend Bob Swanson, but not Paxton. With Paxton, he only claimed credit for his work, as he did with Kunstler and Glanzman. Patterson did not invent the plastic bread bag clip. Patterson made things up to try and impress people. That was the sort of person he was. Looky here at this bent stirrup!

Acknowledging that Patterson was a human who did not only good things, but bad as well, will not kill Bigfoot.

Get over it.

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Guest BFSleuth

If an invention is registered as a patent as a packaging seal, like the Kwik Lok, it doesn't preclude the concept from being sold on the market or even registered as a new patent if the invention applies to a completely different field, like propping apple tree limbs. Patents and trademarks are often narrowly defined regarding their application.

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roguefooter

With Paxton, he only claimed credit for his work

Do you know for a fact that he claimed overall credit for the invention? Or claimed credit for the "Prop Lok" version of it? Green could have easily misunderstood what Patterson was claiming.

Do you know if Patterson and Paxton had developed any kind of business partnership? With the "Prop Lok" being an offshoot of the "Kwik Lok"?

Apparently these points have never been taken into consideration.

Acknowledging that Patterson was a human who did not only good things, but bad as well, will not kill Bigfoot.

Get over it.

I have no problem acknowledging both good and bad, as long as it's the truth and not an assumption.

Scraping up a handful of facts and filling in the blanks with assumptions is not "the truth" that you claim it to be. It's disinformation, and done deliberately to pile up "bad" things that Patterson has done. Asking me to get over your spreading of disinformation isn't going to happen.

Edited by roguefooter
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