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Bill

Would Someone Please Describe The Suit?

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Bill

An open set of questions for our fellow forum members who are kind enough to tell us about the suit in the PGF (parnassus, Demon, Romano, specifically, but others who see the workings of the suit are welcome to comment as well). Not knowing how often you have tried to describe the particulars of a suit, I thought maybe I could facilitate the replies by offering this checklist of specific items and multiple choice options. You can just copy and paste in only the appropriate reply (from the multiple choices), plus, of course, any elaboration you care to share.

If you speak with authority about a suit in the PGF, surely these questions should be easy for a person of your expertise to answer and specify.

1. Is the suit set up as:

A. One piece body, zipper up the back?

B. Two piece body, pants and pullover top, waist split?

C. Two piece body, leggings and pullover top with snap crotch hookup?

2. If a two piece body is indicated, how are the two body sections held secure to each other:

A. Hooks and eyes?

B. Snaps?

C. Zippers?

D. velcro?

3. Are football shoulder pads used? If so, are they:

A. Sewn into the suit top section, and put on with the suit top?

B. Attached first to the person, and then the suit top put on over them?

C. If, "B" above, how are they attached to the person so they don't shift when the person puts on the fur top?

4. Is there a old leather football helmet in the headpiece mask?

If so, is it secured to the mask or put on first?

5. Where does the headmask blend into the body fur?

A. Splits around the collar and not secured to the body?

B. Deep front and back flaps on the mask drop down below the collar onto the body (Janos Prohaska style)?

6. What other padding is in the body? (can choose as many as you like)

A. Butt

B. Legs

C. Torso

D. Arms

7. Are the feet:

A. Snug around the person's real feet?

B. Extending about 1" beyond the person's real feet?

C. Extending about 2" beyond the person's real feet?

D. Extending 3" or more beyond the person's real feet?

8. Are the feet:

A. Slip latex castings with no padding or foam to fit?

B. Latex and polyfoamed around a foot cast?

C. Latex and polyfoamed around a shoe or boot?

9. Is the glass eye:

A. A partial or cresent shaped prosthetic?

B. A full sphere prosthetic?

10. Is the glass eye:

A. attached from behind to a sculpted eyelid?

B. Attached from the front over a deep eye socket mask section?

11. Regarding the glass eye, where's the pupil? (diagram please)

12. For the breasts, they are made how:

A. Direct construction with a common object (toilet plunger has been suggested)?

B. Slip latex casting from a wet clay sculpture and plaster mold?

C. Slip latex skin and polyfoam fill in a two piece mold?

D. Fake breasts glued to suit chest?

13. (For Romano, since he suggested this) The apparent straps seen vertically across the right breast:

A. Where do these straps attach at each end? To what parts of the suit?

B. What are the straps for? Why are they there?

C. What is the breast made of, to need the straps?

14. If a Morris suit was used as the source, but changed to a two piece suit with a waist split, was the zipper:

A. Taken out and the sections sewn together?

B. Closed up and the hair brushed over?

C. Closed up, latex covered it, and more fur added to conceal it?

Feel free to include any diagrams to illustrate your conclusions.

Thank you in advance for sharing your knowledge with us, so we can finally appreciate how this fascinating costume was made.

Bill

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Guest Crowlogic

The only suit involved in anything PGF was the Morris Cow Camp ordeal. I describe the Morris Cow Camp suit as a saggy, baggy lumpy rug of the wrong color.

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Guest

I have strange feeling there won't be too many replies in this thread.

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Guest

Excellent thread Bill, I can't wait to see some of the responses. Ought to be downright entertaining to say the least :popcorn:

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Bill

Thanks.

I'm really hoping to hear more about the breast strap, the feet, and the football shoulder pads.

:)

Bill

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Guest

Let me preface my plan by saying I don't think it is a suit but if I were going to build something like this, this is how I would do it.

1. Buy the largest leotard and tights set available in 1966-67 in either a brown or nude color.

2. Buy a nice size brown or black, possibly both, flokati rugs that were popular in the sixties.

3. Buy upholstery foam that can be carved and molded.

4. Hosery in either nude or brown.

5. Embroidery thread in a matching shade for the area I would be working in.

6. A couple of rolls of stretch elastic.

7. Possibly large black or brown buttons.

8. Crochet or latch hooks used for hooking rugs, large upholstery needle or suture needles.

9.Ink and brush to add color definition to features, if needed during final fitting.

10. Wig stand and tailor's form

I would work on the head first. Soft scuplture with hosiery was done back in the 60's so I would take a pair of LEGG's panty hose ( it has to be LEGGS because they would not run back then, I kept a pair for 24 years before they got a run) and place my hosiery over the pieces of formed upholstery foam used to make the cone, back of the head, and exaggerated facial features. The foam would be pinned onto my styrofoam wig stand. I would pull the hose over the foam forms and sew in place with my upholstery needle and thread. Then I would stitch where I wanted greater definition for nose, eyes, and mouth. Where I defined my eyes with my soft sculpture stitch, I would make a buttonhole seam and slit, then apply my buttons over the opening allowing for just enough vision through the four holes in the middle of the button to allow the person to walk in a straight line. I would then finish applying the flokati wool and trimming as needed until the entire head is covered. A cape attachment would need to be added to the neck of the soft sculpture head mask, flokati fur sewn in longer on the edges to fall over the shoulders to blend with the body. Once the head/cape was completed, I would pull that over my model's head to see how it fit and make needed adjustments. I would get a tailors form and once again sculpt my upholstery foam where I wanted exaggerated musculature and breast tissue and pin to the form. I would slide the tights and leotard over the form and attach the foam to the tights or leotard with my upholstery needle and thread using soft sculpture stitching to get the definition of the leotard over the foam forms where needed. I might use elastic straps across the back and shoulders, much like a bra, to allow for more movement of the shoulder foam muscles and breast foam tissue without having to sew the form in so tightly. I don't want it to look so static as the person moved but yet stay put. Once again, use the crochet hook or latch hook to pull the flokati wool through the material and cover the entire body. Now for the foot, I would use the same principal as clown shoes. I would use the same materials that were used to make fluffy house shoes back then with the foam toes as extensions in soft sculpture to slide over the feet of the leotard. Then I would cover the foot/ shoe with the flokati wool except for the sole. You would need to add longer flokati wool at the ankle to cover the top of the bigfoot house shoe to hide the break in the fur. Your model would need to be about 6'4 or 6'5 to pull off the height, possibly overweight so less foam would need to be added.......and that is how I would do it.

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Guest FuriousGeorge

I'm not really into the PGF but I always wanted to know mostly about the padding. What kind of foams were available then, rigid/flexible? If the padding wasn't foam, how long would it take to get all of the different muscle groups on the legs to be so defined and to stay in place? I know the butt looks a little weird but if it's a suit, the legs and arms came out great. How can this be done back then?

Glad you made the list Bill. I hope someone can answer. In the past I've payed little attention to this subject. As far as the padding, I've only heard the different questions and am not sure if I heard any answers that explained it well.

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Bill

Furious George

On the padding thing, on the amateur level, things like pillows, towels and the like could be used. On the more serious costume level, the available padding types where mosting sheet polyureathane foam, sheet foamed latex (was getting rare in 1967, but still around), and molded polyureathane flexible foam, which needed a two piece mold of plaster to form. There was molded foam latex too, but the shrinkage factor made it undesirable for large padding shapes (was used for some body suits though, because of it's great flexibility.)

Bill

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Guest

there must be some serious studying going on to answer Bill's post! because the silence is deafening.

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Guest

Natural Latex Foam Rubber, and the development of Modern Furniture Designs

Another innovation of modern furniture reupholstery was the invention of perforated natural latex foam rubber. Although invented decades before, natural latex foam rubber was not usable until perforated for the flow of air, carrying away perspiration. It replaced coil springs and horsehair and cotton padding, and could be applied in very thin supportive and resilient layers, to attain innovative designs that could not have been done with traditional upholstery techniques. Natural Latex Foam Rubber could last for 50 years or more. In the 1960’s manufacturers developed inexpensive synthetic foam rubbers, with expected lives of 2 -20 years. When hand-stitched labor is required to reupholster the chair, the longer life of the more costly natural latex foam rubber becomes more sensible.

Before the invention of perforated natural latex foam rubber in the early 1950’s, most modern upholstery padding consisted of a platform of coil springs tied together, with horsehair, Spanish moss, coconut matting, and cotton padding. Art Deco Club Chairs had coil-sprung backs, loose cushions, and seat platforms, and are quite complicated to reupholster.

http://www.oleklejbzon.com/pages/newfurniture/modern_reupholst.htm

It wasn't until the 1960's that the ballet leotard began to surface. Ballet leotards began to come in a wide range of styles and colors to accommodate the ever-changing dancer. Dancers found these articles of clothing to be very comfortable to wear while allowing free-flowing movement of the legs and feet. Pairing the leotard with wool stockings or leg warmers were a popular way to keep the leg muscles warm while dancing.

http://www.balletdancingonline.com/history-of-ballet

Soft sculpture is a type of sculpture made using cloth, foam rubber, plastic, paper, fibers and similar material that are supple and nonrigid.

Popularized in the 1960s by artists such as Claes Oldenburg and Yayoi Kusama, the following is a list of selected artists who have worked with soft sculpture:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soft_sculpture

Two rug types using wool that were popular in the 60's.

http://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/danish-two-rya-rugs-cat+-abstract-vintage-60s

http://www.ehow.com/way_5646120_care-flokati-rugs.html

Edited by Jodie

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Drew

Any idea how this suit goes together?

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Guest Crowlogic

]

Well Drew nothing like answering the question posed with a question. But please let's hear your take on the PGF suit. I can't offer one because I don't think its a suit whereas you do.

That said the video you posted is great fun but even worse resolution that the PGF so who can say. But man when that Bigfoot is flying through the air in the beginning it shows beautifully the human proportions and posturing of a human in a fur costume. Yup typical human jumping down from a high place, or not so high place.

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Guest demon

]

Well Drew nothing like answering the question posed with a question. But please let's hear your take on the PGF suit. I can't offer one because I don't think its a suit whereas you do.

That said the video you posted is great fun but even worse resolution that the PGF so who can say. But man when that Bigfoot is flying through the air in the beginning it shows beautifully the human proportions and posturing of a human in a fur costume. Yup typical human jumping down from a high place, or not so high place.

?worse resolution ??

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wolftrax

]

Well Drew nothing like answering the question posed with a question. But please let's hear your take on the PGF suit. I can't offer one because I don't think its a suit whereas you do.

That said the video you posted is great fun but even worse resolution that the PGF so who can say. But man when that Bigfoot is flying through the air in the beginning it shows beautifully the human proportions and posturing of a human in a fur costume. Yup typical human jumping down from a high place, or not so high place.

Both you and Drew did answer the original question of how the PGF suit was built.

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Guest parnassus

Bill

I think we all get the idea that you don't know how the costume was constructed. Figuring out the details of how Patterson and/or persons known or unknown made it may be of great interest to you; apparently you think you could learn something useful from that information that might enhance your abilities. Good for you. I would suggest that the members here are not the ones you should go to for instruction; you should IMHO start by asking questions, in a sincere and humble manner, of Phillip Morris. Then you might question the people who actually saw the suit; these seem like more logical steps than what you are doing in this thead here, which seems to be pretty much just sacasm, amirite? Then i would suggest approaching some other costume experts, again, in a sincere and humble manner. Surely you have some remaining friends or former associates who would do you a favor. Having obtained as much information as possible you could then obtain some candidate.materials and try your hand at duplicating the costume. Speaking for myself, I don't see this costume as any thing very remarkable. We really only see one side of it, briefly, with poor resolution, and yet a number of flaws can be seen.

I don't know how this iPhone was constructed, either, but I can tell you that it wasn't built by Mother Nature.

Good luck in figuring out the details.

Edited by parnassus

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