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Substantiating Philip Morris' Statements


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Philip Morris claims, as part of his making-of-the-PGF story, that Patterson was sued by all seven investors who invested in the film project that had been hatched. That's a lot of lawsuits. I would suspect there are public records of these somewhere, would there not? Or, have all record of suits filed that long ago been destroyed as part of normal records retention and destruction practices? Also, Morris claims there was a warrant issued for Patterson's arrest when he failed to return the rented movie camera. Would there not also be a record of this warrant somewhere in the law enforcement archives? I'm wondering if anyone has done a fact check on some of Morris' claims. That would help folks like me to decide which side of the story rings more true.

This is part of the problem for the casual observer; there are so many competing facts and stories behind the film that most probably feel its impossible to ever know the truth.

MNskeptic

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Squatchy McSquatch

There was in fact a warrant issued for the rental camea That has never been in dispute. It's part of the backstory  that doesn't matter.

 

You could call Phil Morris. He's very much alive.

 

 

 

 

 

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kitakaze

Philip Morris claims, as part of his making-of-the-PGF story, that Patterson was sued by all seven investors who invested in the film project that had been hatched. That's a lot of lawsuits. I would suspect there are public records of these somewhere, would there not? Or, have all record of suits filed that long ago been destroyed as part of normal records retention and destruction practices? Also, Morris claims there was a warrant issued for Patterson's arrest when he failed to return the rented movie camera. Would there not also be a record of this warrant somewhere in the law enforcement archives? I'm wondering if anyone has done a fact check on some of Morris' claims. That would help folks like me to decide which side of the story rings more true.

This is part of the problem for the casual observer; there are so many competing facts and stories behind the film that most probably feel its impossible to ever know the truth.

MNskeptic

 

Regarding the camera, it was not a matter of oops, I forgot. Patterson wrote a bum cheque and was to return the camera two days later.

Patterson+-+grand+larceny.gif

 

When Al DeAtley had made enough capital barnstorming the film to take over his father's company he allowed Patterson to take over full rights on the condition he find buyer for the film. See the following timeline of events... 

 

 

The questions are moot and here is why: No matter one's personal perspective on the PGF, one thing that can not be changed about its history was that it was a cashgrab. It was a cashgrab if it was a Bigfoot. It was a cashgrab if it was a man in a suit. The characters, the costumes, the impostors, the illusions - all these things were planned and arranged whether you think they really found Bigfoot or not. Let's say, for example, that when the film was brought on its publicity tour to New York and was taken by Life magazine to the American Museum of Natural History, who summarily tossed it, that it was accepted as legitimate rather than being dismissed. The only way they would have gotten that film from Roger and thereby stopped his promotional tour of it was if they were able to be the highest bidders that they were looking for. Even then, simply by looking at the historical record, we know this would not have stopped Roger's barnstorming. He sold the rights to people all over the place and made a huge quagmire of the ownership that took into the 80's to sort out. He did this and kept barnstorming the film until he was no longer able.

Let's look at the history...

Friday, October 20, 1967 - The film is allegedly filmed.

Sunday, October 22, 1967 - The film has somehow been developed in under 48 hours on a weekend and made it to Al DeAtley's basement in Yakima for an early Sunday afternoon showing. DeAtley will later tell Rene Dahinden that he is not allowed to tell him how this was achieved. Present at this showing are Jim McClarin, John Green, Rene Dahinden. Green and Dahinden implore Roger to show the film at UBC in a setting they deem favourable to the film. Roger resists this idea and already has the plans in motion to begin the touring that DeAtley has engineered. Roger, however, reluctantly accepts to show the film but informs the men that the film will eventually be sold to the highest bidder.

Wednesday, October 25, 1967 - Patterson takes film to Ford Labs in Seattle and does interview for Seattle Times.

Thursday, October 26, 1967 - The film is showed twice in Vancouver, BC. Once for a small selection of scientists farmed by Green and then again in the evening to a larger audience with the press present at the Georgia Hotel. Royal BC Museum arhcaeologist Don Abbott expresses interest in the film. Anthropologist Robin Ridington dismisses it as a hoax by Patterson. Royal BC Museum colleague of Abbott's Frank Beebe says the anatomical structure is suspect and takes issue with the male gait and the sagittal crest without protuberant belly.

Wednesday, November 1, 1967 - DeAtley, Patterson, and Gimlin go to Hollywood less than two weeks after the alleged filming date to create Bigfoot Enterprises with the help of Hollywood lawyer Walter Hurst. Hurst is already connected to Patterson through his efforts to copyright the name Bigfoot. There is an attempt to get Aaron Spelling to buy the rights to the film, but Spelling loses interest and the talks lead to nothing. Roger and DeAtley use their connections to arrange for Roger to do the talk show circuit while in Hollywood. Sometime between this point and when the film first came into being, DeAtley gives Roger $75,000 which he describes as "being for his cause."

Early to mid November - Life magazine flies Patterson, DeAtley and Gimlin to New York for a showing and a screening by scientists from American Natural History Museum. Patterson meets with Ivan Sanderson for the first time and does the interview later published in Argosy magazine. Argosy flies the men back to Yakima before November 23 Thanksgiving. Life loses interest after AMNH dismisses the film as a hoax and Sanderson moves to get in on the PGF action. He gathered opinions from experts he chose such as his longtime colleague Bernard Heuvelmans as well as John Napier. Napier takes issues with various anatomical features but remains open to the film. Surprisingly, Heuvelmans dismisses the film as an obvious hoax. The Argosy article later published in February 1968 by Sanderson is riddled with errors and removes any hint of skepticism towards the film such as that by colleague Heuvelmans.

Tuesday, November 28, 1967 - Patterson is served an arrest warrant in Yakima for grand larceny for a camera he took from Sheppard's Camera on a bad cheque and was to return two days later.

Early spring 1968 - Ivan Sanderson convinces DeAtley and Patterson to be Patterson's agent and arranges for the BBC to film a documentary featuring the PGF with commentary from scientists like John Napier. Again as with the Argosy article, this film removes all dissenting opinions on the film. After being shown in the UK the BBC gives a copy of the film to DeAtley and Patterson which DeAtley then takes and pays to be turned first into a 52 minute television program and then a 96 minute feature film. These feature Al DeAtley posing as the executive director of Northwest Research Association where they use the personal library of the Yakima Valley Junior College president to pose as their fake headquarters. This is the film they then use for the barnstorming tour where they use the four-walling technique DeAtley learned from television advertisers in the mid-60's. Four-walling entails a distributor (in this case DeAtley) hiring a theatre to show a single film after saturating the local market with heavy advertising for a concentrated period of time.

After edging out Gimlin who did not want to participate in the touring of the film and replacing him with an impostor Gimlin playing the role fo the fake Indian tracker, Patterson and DeAtley continue to tour the film making hundreds of thousands of dollars. Having made enough money to get his father's paving company out of the red, DeAtley is told by Patterson in the spring of 1969 that he wants DeAtley to sign over his 50% share in the film. DeAtley agrees to do this on the condition that Patterson finds a buyer for the film. This turns out to be American National Enterprises and on August 5, 1970, DeAtley formally transfers all rights to Patterson. What follows after this is the mess created by Patterson right up until his death where he began selling the rights to show the film to various parties. Though Patterson had originally sold the rights to show the film in Canada to John Green and Rene Dahinden, he then sold the same rights again to M.J. Marchant and Edward McLoughlin of Canadian film company Arctic Safari Productions. They were then again sold to ANE which in turn authorized Sun Classic and Wolper Organization. This created years of legal wrangling between various parties suing each other for hundreds of thousands of dollars.

What the take home message is, is that it would never have mattered if the PGF had been taken seriously by the scientific community. It would have never interfered with what the PGF was and was always meant to be - C.R.E.A.M. - cash money rules everything around me. It was a cash cow the milking of which would not have stopped because of the opinions of scientists. Showing the film to scientists was an afterthought and when the likes of Don Abbott and Jack Napier expressed openness to the film, it didn't matter because their respective organizations were not interested in ponying up the cream that DeAtley and Patterson were asking for.

 

 

Patterson's arrest warrant and the public court records regarding the legal battles over cross-rights are all published in Greg Long's Making of Bigfoot.

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Guest Cervelo

^^^^

All that's missing is a bow....wow how anyone could think PGF wasn't anything more than two cowboys making a moive about Bigfoot after reading that is beyond me.

But hey that's how alot of urban legends become fact....by ignoring the facts ;)

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SweatyYeti

^^^^

All that's missing is a bow....wow how anyone could think PGF wasn't anything more than two cowboys making a moive about Bigfoot after reading that is beyond me.

But hey that's how alot of urban legends become fact....by ignoring the facts. 

 

 

 

Unfortunately, Cervelo....the Patterson Film is actually gaining strength, as the scientific analysis continues. :)

 

 

Speaking of facts....did you know that in most humans, the upper-leg is significantly longer than the upper-arm?...

 

NordicWalkers1G_zps8fb2c014.jpg

 

 

But with Patty...they are very nearly the same length... :) ...

 

F362-UpperArm-UpperLeg-Ratio1B_zps90a0d9

 

 

Since the shoulder-joint can be hidden within a suit....I used a conservative point for the upper end of Patty's humerus. I chose a point just above the 'arm pit'. So, the length of Patty's upper-arm may well be even closer to equaling the length of the upper-leg. 

 

Also...in the image of the woman, the point I chose for the upper-end of the humerus is well above the arm pit.

 

 

I'm sure you won't be able to refute this significant difference between Patty and a human, Cervelo....so, feel free to ignore these facts. :lol:

Edited by SweatyYeti
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Guest Cervelo

No need to....once someone produces a bigfoot that looks like a dude in a crappy suit, with feet that leave prints that look like wooden feet and gravity defy boobies....then maybe we can discuss body proportions ;)

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On post #7, you were doing pretty good there until you posted the side by side pics pulling me right back to patty-is-real camp. Should have quit while you were ahead. we both know I would be even more unreasonable asking to see both images in motion, but by now that goes without saying. The fail always comes from the same thing: The failure to be able to make that suit especially when viewed in motion.

Props to Kit for great background stuff for all of us to read, learn from, investigate, and consider though.

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I should make it clear I do not read anything outrageous about the backstory esp when money is involved. If I ever pulled a hoax of a man ape, I would run to the press and never to scientist knowledgable about apes, anthropology, and so on like Patterson did. Just a further thought to consider on human nature. It is the equivalent of Patterson Knowing he is lying and then rushing off to the top people in lie detection.

Now their conclusions of not being impressed do not change that fact.

If a man finds a diamond ring and returns it to the store in his mind he thinks he is returning a $5,000 ring he found. The ring could be a glass ring worth $250 but in his mind he behaves like the act of an honest man. That is what Patterson did when taking the film to scientist types after the filming.

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SweatyYeti

No need to....once someone produces a bigfoot that looks like a dude in a crappy suit, with feet that leave prints that look like wooden feet and gravity defy boobies....then maybe we can discuss body proportions ;)

 

 

Cervelo ignores the facts....as expected. :)

 

 

I have no need to discuss 'body proportions' with you, Cervelo. I'll just continue along this line of analysis, and eventually move it beyond this Forum. 

 

Meanwhile....your words, and kit's....as with tontar's....will fade away, into oblivion. 

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Rockape

Well, I see the usual disinformation and propaganda is all that is being bandied about again.

 

So, can we get clarification on this?

 

Patterson was sued by all seven investors who invested in the film project.

 

Who were these seven investors and did they all sue RP?

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