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MikeZimmer

Mangani's Bigfoot Maps

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MikeZimmer

I don't know if this has been discussed on the current Bigfoot Forum but Mangani, a member of the previous forum, did some marvelous maps of sightings in North America. They are available in several formats, including a Google Earth layer. If you have not seen them, you should. They are astonishing.

 

 

See http://penn.freeservers.com/bigfootmaps/ for Mangani's main page, with some sample maps.

 

See https://www.facebook.com/SasquatchDaily/posts/161506874046961 for a Facebook page.

 

See http://www.mediafire.com/download/k9pky0pzcbaikoq/bigfootreports.kmz for a Google Earth .kmz file, which will add the map to Google Earth. You can filter by date as well.

 

For those who do not use it, Google Earth is itself an amazing thing for a map lover - free in its basic version but still very powerful. It goes way beyond Google Maps of other in terms of its functionality.

 

Mangani's maps are a major piece of work, and are something I recommend to anyone who wants to get a picture of the sheer number of sightings, and the geographic patterns of sightings.

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gigantor

Mangani has done great work.

 

We based our own SSR Database project from his work. Premium members have access to the DB, check out the demo.

Edited by gigantor

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MikeZimmer

gigantor,

 

It was nice to see how far you have come in the implementation of the database. It had not occurred to me that you would be linking in to maps and web pages, but in hindsight it is an obvious thing to do.

 

Is anyone successfully using it to guide field research, or maybe do some number crunching for patterns, what have you?

 

regards

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MIB

Is anyone successfully using it to guide field research, or maybe do some number crunching for patterns, what have you?

 

Yes ... and it raises bigger questions than it answers.  If the observations are correct, there is a mechanism driving them.  So far, I can eliminate the obvious and comfortable.    What's left points towards a rabbit hole ... oh, joy.

 

MIB

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Trogluddite

MZ, 

 

The maps are admittedly brilliant, although I don't know how functional if you want to search (the maps) by season, month, description, etc. 

 

The SSR is also useful, but limited at this time - for example searching Pennsylvania yields about 40 results; there are 100 in the BFRO database along.  Searching Vermont yields 20 encounters; there are almost 3 times that number.

 

I am doing data and map analysis separately using my own products, which themselves are limited geographically to the northeastern US and limited in effectiveness right now because it takes time and experience to get 675 reports logged in and mapped and analyzed.  I'm working on a write-up now for the Green/Berkshire/Litchfield range.  MIB hit the nail on the head above - it raises more questions than it answers.  Bigfoot "zones" of encounters moving north to south over a century.  Discretely identifiable Bigfoot being seen in one area during one decade, then disappearing. 

 

Good thing I have no qualms about drinking heavily....

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gigantor

Is anyone successfully using it to guide field research, or maybe do some number crunching for patterns, what have you?

 

regards

 

Absolutely, you should join the Premium section and help us.

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SWWASAS

Yes ... and it raises bigger questions than it answers.  If the observations are correct, there is a mechanism driving them.  So far, I can eliminate the obvious and comfortable.    What's left points towards a rabbit hole ... oh, joy.

 

MIB

MIB I know your background. Would you elaborate on your findings with database study or is it a work in progress? Rabbit holes sometimes lead somewhere, at least for the rabbit they do.

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JKH

^I'm curious, too.

 

MIB hit the nail on the head above - it raises more questions than it answers.  Bigfoot "zones" of encounters moving north to south over a century.  Discretely identifiable Bigfoot being seen in one area during one decade, then disappearing. 

 

Couldn't this be explained by a number of factors, mainly human development and encroachment? I don't understand why such data seems strange, unless you're theorizing that they could be somehow managing their resources?

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Trogluddite

^^^^

 

Well, strange in that the encounters - which are historical encounters in the Green/Berkshire/Litchfield Mountains/Hills range - run counter to how I understand colonization was going at the time.  I believe the colonies expanded north and west, so I would have expected encounters to start early near the coast, then keep getting pushed north.

 

Instead, the earliest encounters are in northern Vermont and progress south. Perhaps counter-intuitive was a better adjective. 

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Guest

I was looking at the top link, don't have google maps installed. Does this have pinpoint locations with exact areas?  $100.00 if someone posts Colorado!! :music:

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MikeZimmer

I was looking at the top link, don't have google maps installed. Does this have pinpoint locations with exact areas?  $100.00 if someone posts Colorado!! :music:

 

 

Mangani has tried to come as close to the location as he can, but that information is not always available. I checked a location in Princeton BC, collected by Tom Steenberg. From the description, I took the location to be north of town, but the map showed south of town. However, I may have misread the report. Colorado is covered. Managi has used multiple sources, but it is not complete. Crowd sourcing could make it complete.  Google Earth is free and easy to install. See http://www.google.com/earth/download/ge/agree.html

Edited by MikeZimmer

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Trogluddite

I was looking at the top link, don't have google maps installed. Does this have pinpoint locations with exact areas?  $100.00 if someone posts Colorado!! :music:

I believe the maps work with Google Earth more so than Google Maps - could be wrong, in fact if it has to do w/computers most likely am.

 

If I understand the maps correctly, Mssr. Mangani got his hands on reams of lat/long information from various groups and entered that lat/long into his database.  I hope that's how he did it, because if he spent time searching for each spot and calculating the location, he is certifiably insane.  

 

So Colorado looks something like this (Mods, feel free to remove - after I collect my $100 - if this is too big). 

 

post-18000-0-93237400-1419649671_thumb.j

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gigantor

Mangani got his data directly from the BFRO and other sources...  the BFRO now releases the data to the public, it's on their website.

 

@Wag, you're a premium member, you can use the SSR database and search for whatever you want. PM me for username/password.

Edited by gigantor

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MIB

MIB I know your background. Would you elaborate on your findings with database study or is it a work in progress? Rabbit holes sometimes lead somewhere, at least for the rabbit they do.

 

Hi Randy -

 

The work is done until there is more data.  

 

The vast majority of the reports, over 90% by my estimate, from the Cascade range fall between Aug 15 and Sept 15.   I thought I was onto something new 'til I read Henry Franzoni's book ... son of a gun, he found the same pattern independently.    The last 10 percent seem to be pretty random roughly reflective of how many people are in the woods at any given time.

 

What I expected to see was a northbound or southbound ripple of activity indicating change of weather, ripening of some food crop, or migration.  Nope.  It happens at exactly the same time the whole 750 miles ... probably farther but I haven't examined Canadian reports. 

 

The ONLY thing I can think of that affects the whole mountain range at once is something celestial.   My rabbit hole of the day :) is ... trying to say this without overly anthropomorphising it ... some kind of religious observation / activity based on lunar cycle.  I'm sure the ape camp will be split between being offended and having a giggle-fest but our ancestors did such things ... so why not?

 

At the same time, I'm open to more conventional ideas IF they align with, and account for, rather than conflict with, the existing data.

 

MIB

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