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Photos In A Bfro Report Just Posted

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MrSkwatch

My guess is squirrel nests. Would two bears just happen to be at the top of pines trees at the same time? Seems like a stretch to me that they are animals.

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Rockape

Hard to really judge the size, but looks to me like those would be very big squirrels to make those nests.

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FootDude

Nothing can really be deduced from the photos.

The fact that the story-teller mentions the reader should get an 'off/odd feeling' once the photos are viewed raises a red-flag for me.

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DWA

My guess is squirrel nests. Would two bears just happen to be at the top of pines trees at the same time? Seems like a stretch to me that they are animals.

They look like animals.  I've seen bears in trees and squirrel nests beyond counting.  I'd bet my car they aren't nests of anything.

 

And again, there's the account of the person who was there.  The crippling disability of this field is presuming lie or mistake, something that science when it's being practiced correctly never does.

 

I see the words "red flag" too often on bigfoot websites.  The cited one^^^isn't.

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Guest

Two bears in two trees? Not adult bears, therefore cubs. Cubs then........where's mama?  No mama bear present....

now we have to do some research. Go to the site, measure the tree diameters, and scale to determine size of object/critter. This would also determine if it is a nest, mistletoe etc. Come on BFRO, step up!

 

 

 

PS: Bears can climb down a tree as fast as a squirrel

 

 

edited to add PS

Edited by John T

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Cisco

I'm by no means an arboreal expert but I'm assuming somebody knows the type of trees shown in the photos?

 

Once we knew the type of tree, wouldn't it be possible to get an average height and size estimate of that particular type of tree? From there, we could do some measuring and do a very rough calculation of the size of the "things" in the tree?

 

For example: The trees grow to an average height of 50 feet, have a trunk diameter 2 feet and taper to a diameter of 6". We could then find pictures of other animals in similar trees and see how much they stand out. We could then extrapolate if we're looking at bear sized "things" or raccoon sized "things."

 

I'm just tossing it out there as an idea....

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DWA

Some real nuts and bolts could indeed be done on this.  And should have been, before us. The witness knows just where these were; it's actually quite surprising to me that the BFRO investigator didn't go right there with the witness to find out all pertinent details in situ.

Edited by DWA

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SWWASAS

Two bears in two trees? Not adult bears, therefore cubs. Cubs then........where's mama?  No mama bear present....

now we have to do some research. Go to the site, measure the tree diameters, and scale to determine size of object/critter. This would also determine if it is a nest, mistletoe etc. Come on BFRO, step up!

 

 

 

PS: Bears can climb down a tree as fast as a squirrel

 

 

edited to add PS

As far as the trees are away if bears were involved the mother could be anywhere. I saw a nature video with twin cubs that climbed two trees just like this. The mother was nearby but the cubs in the tree in are not really too much in danger. So the mother could have been anyplace nearby just watching.

I think BF juveniles may even be encouraged to climb trees to stay out of danger or be put there while the mother goes off chasing down a meal. I cannot think of anyplace safer if you rule out the use of firearms that have a long reach.

But I join the consensus in this case that whatever is in this picture cannot be determined after the fact. Could be most anything.

Edited by SWWASASQUATCHPROJECT

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adam2323

I'll give my two cents. I live about 55 miles from where this picture is said to be taken. I grew up in the Sierras the trees in question are Ponderosa pines. Years ago I ran hounds in all over the Sierras and put hundreds of bears up very similar trees. I have never seen a bear up a tree unless it felt threatened i.e being chased by dog/humans. These images do not have the shape of bears. Given there position up high in the tree I can't believe they are very large. Looking off my porch at Ponderosa Pines similar in size while typing this .. That far up the branches are getting rather thin and would not support a lot of weight. It's seems to be some kind of animal (not a squirrel nest) IMO not a bear. Like I said generally black bears will stay on the ground unless harried by dogs. Cubs? Where's mom? Although we can be sure of the exact tree size my guess is that the are a little over 100 feet.

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Guest

came across 2 bears in the same tree recently on a hike.

 

you know why bears end up in trees? other bears. shrinking habitats lead to bears being bears' biggest predators.

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norseman

There is a pine tree in the center but the two blobs are in fir trees, not pine.

Which makes me suspect dwarf mistletoe.

post-735-0-00798300-1444656562_thumb.jpg

Edited by norseman

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Guest

 

Two bears in two trees? Not adult bears, therefore cubs. Cubs then........where's mama?  No mama bear present....

now we have to do some research. Go to the site, measure the tree diameters, and scale to determine size of object/critter. This would also determine if it is a nest, mistletoe etc. Come on BFRO, step up!

 

 

 

PS: Bears can climb down a tree as fast as a squirrel

 

 

edited to add PS

As far as the trees are away if bears were involved the mother could be anywhere. I saw a nature video with twin cubs that climbed two trees just like this. The mother was nearby but the cubs in the tree in are not really too much in danger. So the mother could have been anyplace nearby just watching.

I think BF juveniles may even be encouraged to climb trees to stay out of danger or be put there while the mother goes off chasing down a meal. I cannot think of anyplace safer if you rule out the use of firearms that have a long reach.

But I join the consensus in this case that whatever is in this picture cannot be determined after the fact. Could be most anything.

 

 

I don't think it's worth the time or money to research a picture like that. Maybe it's real but there's not much there.

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BigTreeWalker

Never hunted bears with dogs, but I have property in a canyon in eastern Washington with lots of bears in it. Several times I've found aspen smaller than the tops of those trees where a young bear had climbed it and broke it over, it appears just for the fun of it.

I'm with Norseman, those are fir trees flanking a pine tree. Easy to tell by the tops of the trees.

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Spader

Hello all. Haven't posted in a while but have been around. That picture with all of the bear cubs in the tree could be the cutest thing I've seen in a while. When people are out and about in the woods one tends to keep your eyes on the trail or at least try to. No one ever thinks to look UP. Im sure the big guy can climb a tree if its stout enough that is. Of course my head is usually in the clouds anyway so I do tend to look upwards more often than most. 

I have had a lifelong interest in the weather and am always looking at the sky. Identifying clouds and the such. To this day I still haven't seen a UFO (I'm an idiot) or a bigfoot. But I still have hope.

 

I do hope everyone is well.

Spader

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Guest

came across 2 bears in the same tree recently on a hike.

 

you know why bears end up in trees? other bears. shrinking habitats lead to bears being bears' biggest predators.

Or this: 😉

post-24947-0-71330000-1445439916_thumb.j

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