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Bigfoot, Ghillie, Or Hoax? 2015

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Airdale

WRT the battery issue only, and based on ten years of digital photography using three different cameras to make 26,803 still photos and several hours of video, this is what I've found. Murphy's law applies to rechargeable batteries. They will run down, suddenly, and at the worst possible moment, even when you are proactive with battery maintenance. All three cameras are Canons, as were most of the 35 m.m. SLRs  I've used since 1971. Two of the digitals are what's commonly known as superzooms which utilize a sensor smaller than a postage stamp but are equipped with fairly decent zoom lenses permanently attached: an S2 IS with 12x zoom purchased in 2005 and used until 2010 to make 11,494 images and still used by my son, and an SX20IS with 20x zoom purchased in 2010 and sitting on the desk in front of me ready to grab and go and with 7,528 images. The other is a Canon EOS Rebel T3i DSLR purchased in 2012 and with 7,781 images made.

 

The two superzooms use 4 AA cells and in both I have used only Energizer NiMH cells with an Energizer fast charger. I keep 3 complete sets of 4 cells, color coded to avoid mixing different age cells, rotated on the same schedule and the oldest set replaced every 24 months regardless of performance. Both cameras average 400 to 500 shots per set, the variations due primarily to usage of the power zoom. I've not moved up to one of the newer Canon or other brand superzooms as they have gone to dedicated Lithium-Ion cells that are expensive and not available at the corner convenience store in a pinch. The DSLR does use one of the Lithium-Ion cells which I top off any time I'm going out with the camera. I don't use it as often as the newer superzoom but generally take more photos when it is used.

 

Bottom line: with either of the superzooms, when the low battery indicator appears in the viewfinder I swap batteries then because there will be less than a dozen shots left, much less if the zoom is being used and forget the flash. Early experience with the DSLR is why I top off the battery before taking it out; while the zoom is manual, the battery has to power the mirror up and down with every shot or hold the mirror up when using the large rear display in live view mode or for video. These batteries have a very flat power curve, maintaining close to full performance until nearly exhausted, then taking a nose dive. And even with my proactive approach I got hit just last week part way through a boat tour of the Gates of the Mountains on the Missouri River north of Helena. I was with some new friends, Bigfooters all, visiting from Wisconsin, when the low battery indicator showed up in my SX20IS as I zoomed in to try and photograph some baby geese trailing behind mama just off shore. I hit 20x, squeezed the shutter button half way to focus and read exposure, adjusted the shutter speed down a couple of stops and got one shot before the camera shut down. Fortunately, backup batteries were ready to go and I was back up and running in under two minutes. 

 

Battery failure doesn't surprise me at all, and no, with all due respect to some of our fellow forum members, the Squatch don't even need to drain batteries, Murphy is on the job 24/7/365.

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sprayanpray

Ghillie suit with Ghillie head mask around the 2 min slow it down and you can see the hands all dark so looks like some type of gloves.

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OkieFoot

I just don't see this being a ghillie suit. If it's a hoax it seems like it would be a fur suit. Aren't ghillie suits made to make you blend in with your surroundings and become "invisible"? This figure does not blend in, you can clearly see it. It appears to be solid black in color; aside from a homemade ghillie, do ghillies come in solid colors?

I thought ghillies normally came with a cover of artificial leaves, or twigs and leaves, or fake straw, or in green/brown camouflage, etc.  

 

When the figure is getting up, you can see the sun reflecting off it's head and shoulders; the head and shoulders look shiny. You also see the sun shining off its head as the figure turns to walk away. Maybe I'm wrong but I can't see a ghillie suit that would reflect the sun off of it like we see in the video; you would no longer be invisible in that case. 

 

It appears to be summertime; everything is fully leafed out and green. It's usually fairly hot and humid in Georgia in summer so If this was a person wearing a ghille in summertime in Georgia, he's probably going to smother. Especially if he had to walk some distance while wearing it, and then sit still for a while. 

Unless the rancher was part of a hoax, would it be worth smothering in the Georgia summer heat, not knowing if the rancher would have a gun or a camera?

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SWWASAS

There are many types of ghillie suits.   Like camo you sort of have to select the suit for the environment and vegetation.    Some are little more than nets with fabric strips woven in so would not be much hotter than normal clothing.      I wonder if it was a human poacher on private land?     That would explain why it did not want to be seen or located by the property owner.    In hunting country,  most private property owners post no trespassing signs to keep hunters away.    They know they are subject to arrest / fine for trespassing.   I suppose that cattle farmers have to even be concerned about people shooting cows for meat.   Cows or deer out of season are pretty much the same risk for a poacher.   

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OkieFoot

There are many types of ghillie suits.   Like camo you sort of have to select the suit for the environment and vegetation.    Some are little more than nets with fabric strips woven in so would not be much hotter than normal clothing.      I wonder if it was a human poacher on private land?     That would explain why it did not want to be seen or located by the property owner.    In hunting country,  most private property owners post no trespassing signs to keep hunters away.    They know they are subject to arrest / fine for trespassing.   I suppose that cattle farmers have to even be concerned about people shooting cows for meat.   Cows or deer out of season are pretty much the same risk for a poacher.   

 

Could any of these ghillie fabrics be of a type that would reflect sunrays like what we see in the video? I may not be thinking broadly enough but I can't think of any clothing type fabrics that would do this, and look shiny in the sun. To me, if it's a person in the video, it just seems more like what we might see from some type of artificial fur in a suit than from ghillie suits.

 

If it was a hoax, a poacher on private land makes sense. It's hard to see a person simply trespassing onto private land for no real purpose other than to be seen by the rancher, or owner, and risk getting shot at.

These ranchers make their livelihood from their cattle and will be protective of them; and aren't likely to be very tolerant of trespassers and poachers.

 

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VAfooter
Moderator

Especially in the South, this was not in CA, OR, WA, or someplace where folks might be less likely to carry a firearm. One would have to consider the high likelihood that the rancher would be armed with at least a sidearm or varmint gun. Unless the hoaxer already knew the potential victim and that they never carried a gun when doing their rounds.

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Airdale

Not much different than most of rural Montana in that respect. The guy that tried a Bigfoot hoax along US-93 up by Kalispell a couple of years ago ended up killed by a passing car. He was using a ghillie suit too, if I recall correctly.

Edited by Airdale

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