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Wally - Walas Bigfoot Suit And Patty.


kitakaze
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Guest Bigfoothunter

Cant help but notice how high up the chin is on this Wally - Walas suit. Notice that the Wally - Walas head seems to be sitting up a bit higher relative to the shoulders than it does on Patty. The sides of the neck on Patty, leading up to the head seem much more massive and the Wally - Walas suit looks like it just includes an extended cover piece behind the head, not on the sides, which makes the head appear to be lower or further forward on the shoulders.

 

I noticed that as well. Lots of suits worn by hoaxers make that mistake as the suit is made for a human to wear and most do not spend the money or take the time to build it so the head looks to be down in the shoulders.

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I can get in my car and drive 75 minutes and go Squatchin in the NJ Pine Barrens and hey biggie is reported there by lots of sincere folks.  However what nobody except us real worlders understand is that set yourself down in the middle of the Barrens and walk in any direction you choose and within the course of an easy day's hike  you'll be in a mega population center.  If I'm not mistaken that's where Matt Moneymaker had his sighting.  

 

I had several weird experiences there. Rock clacking at 2AM, people walking around behind our group when all were accounted for (in the dark and in a remote location); I can go on. The pine barrens can be quite spooky at night. Have at it. FWIW, about 80% of New Joisy is pine forest. Despite mega population centers nearby.

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^^^What that real worlder doesn't understand is what real outdoor people like me can tell you from just what we see of the NJ Turnpike:  there's lots of virtually untouched real estate in NJ...as well as in most other states.  "An easy day's hike."  HAHAHAHA!  Him first.

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Guest Crowlogic

^^^What that real worlder doesn't understand is what real outdoor people like me can tell you from just what we see of the NJ Turnpike:  there's lots of virtually untouched real estate in NJ...as well as in most other states.  "An easy day's hike."  HAHAHAHA!  Him first.

^^^Hey genius I grew up on the boarders of the NJ Pinelands.  I've camped hiked and been in the place more times than I can count.  Easy hiking you bet,  it's flat   Thick undergrowth not hardly, huge trees, very few, difficult rocky terrain heck no it's sand not unlike beach sand.   Trails and roads..lots of them it's not Tibet.

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That is true but places there can have a way of looking like other places. People get lost in there all the time. Pardon me for saying this but if you think there is no undergrowth you've not actually been there. Its choked with it- blueberry and scrub oak for starters.

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Guest Crowlogic

That is true but places there can have a way of looking like other places. People get lost in there all the time. Pardon me for saying this but if you think there is no undergrowth you've not actually been there. Its choked with it- blueberry and scrub oak for starters.

I didn't say no undergrowth.  I said light undergrowth.  Here's a shot of the great big bigfoot filled Pine Barren wilderness.

 

Pine%20Barrens_zpsu6hd3emi.jpg

Edited by Crowlogic
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^^^What that real worlder doesn't understand is what real outdoor people like me can tell you from just what we see of the NJ Turnpike:  there's lots of virtually untouched real estate in NJ...as well as in most other states.  "An easy day's hike."  HAHAHAHA!  Him first.

I sometimes wonder if you have ever stepped foot outside.

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That is true but places there can have a way of looking like other places. People get lost in there all the time. Pardon me for saying this but if you think there is no undergrowth you've not actually been there. Its choked with it- blueberry and scrub oak for starters.

most people talking about most backcountry are speaking from ignorance.  I've spent quite a bit of time in the Pine Barrens.  Anything like this living in there has little in the way of discovery to worry about, as long as everyone laughs at everyone having an experience.  There's more than way too much country.

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Guest Bigfoothunter

That is true but places there can have a way of looking like other places. People get lost in there all the time. Pardon me for saying this but if you think there is no undergrowth you've not actually been there. Its choked with it- blueberry and scrub oak for starters.

 

Crowlogic has been saying lots of things that she knows little to nothing about.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pine_Barrens_%28New_Jersey%29

 

"

This article is about the New Jersey ecosystem. For other uses, see Pine Barrens (disambiguation).
300px-2009-11-04_20-View_north_from_the_
 
View north from a fire tower on Apple Pie Hill in Wharton State Forest, the highest point in the New Jersey Pine Barrens
220px-A300%2C_Mullica_River%2C_Pinelands
 
Large open area along the Mullica River southeast of Lake Atsion created by beaver dams

The Pine Barrens, also known as the Pinelands or simply the Pines, is a heavily forested area of coastal plain stretching across more than seven counties of southern New Jersey."

Edited by Bigfoothunter
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That is true but places there can have a way of looking like other places. People get lost in there all the time. Pardon me for saying this but if you think there is no undergrowth you've not actually been there. Its choked with it- blueberry and scrub oak for starters.

I didn't say no undergrowth.  I said light undergrowth.  Here's a shot of the great big bigfoot filled Pine Barren wilderness.

 

'Light' as in: you can sort of make your way through it? Hm. Here is a link to your quote:

 

http://bigfootforums.com/index.php/topic/52505-wally-walas-bigfoot-suit-and-patty/?p=934568

 

In it you state:

 

 

 

Thick undergrowth not hardly

 

 

So we see now that what you really meant to say was that 'light undergrowth', which is incorrect.

 

OK- I'm sure there are parts of the Pine Barrens where undergrowth is 'light'. However most of it is choked with undergrowth as it is a fire-based ecosystem and there has been fire control there for far too long, just like what is going on in the Rocky Mountains. That is also why its infested with ticks and chiggers. Fire has a way of keeping their numbers down. At any rate, sounds like you've not spent a lot of time there or you would not have said what you did; I've apparently been there than you despite my being from Minnesota.

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Guest Crowlogic

I have posted this article as a direct response to the member claiming that this member does not have an accurate description of the NJ Pinelands.  I will say it again the region is not the Amazon, sorry folks it's just not even if a few photo vistas make it seem vast beyond reason.

 

 

 

People, Life, Culture

The human experience of the Pine Barrens has shaped the landscape in which we live today.

Native Americans exploited the Pine Barrens for game and berries. The remains of their settlements are common, though generally unobserved, in and around the Pine Barrens. Europeans began to arrive in numbers during the early 18th C. and quickly transformed the region, both socially and ecologically. They cleared farms around the Pine Barrens, but found the sandy soils of the barrens itself unwelcoming for farm crops – hence the name “Pine Barrens.†Rather than farm, European settlers exploited the Pine Barrens for its natural resources of timber, bog iron and sand. But as virgin forests and richer sources of ore opened up to the west, our society largely abandoned the Pine Barrens, allowing the forest to recover and reclaim many of the villages scattered throughout the region for nature. Only today’s sand and gravel mining operations harken back to the early, pervasive industrial exploitation of the Pine Barrens.

Today over 400,000 people live inside the Pinelands boundary. More than 20 million people live within 60 miles of the Pinelands.

The 20th C. brought changes both benign and destructive. Starting in the late 19th C., cranberry and blueberry farmers learned to grow these native crops on a large scale, and they continue to prosper today. Most drastic, however, has been the simple influx of people who live in and around the Pine Barrens but do not make their living off the land. Today over 400,000 people live inside the Pinelands boundary. More than 20 million people live within 60 miles of the Pinelands. Residential subdivisions, shopping malls, offices and roads have eliminated and fragmented much of the original Pine Barrens ecosystem. The region’s natural, cultural and historic resources have taken a beating across much of the Pine Barrens. And unlike colonial villages and industries, today’s development will never give way to nature again.

Citizens and their political leaders stepped in during the late 1970s to try to save the Pine Barrens before it was lost forever. Through a tremendous effort, the national and state governments were persuaded to institute the country’s most ambitious and most creative natural preservation effort. Rather than create a national park expropriating all the thousands of residents already living in the Pinelands, they decided to create a growth management plan that would use regulations and incentives to concentrate development in specified growth areas around the Pinelands’ edges, while severely restricting development options in the large intact forests of the Pine Barrens’ interior.

 

 

 http://www.pinelandsalliance.org/history/people/


 

 



That is true but places there can have a way of looking like other places. People get lost in there all the time. Pardon me for saying this but if you think there is no undergrowth you've not actually been there. Its choked with it- blueberry and scrub oak for starters.

I didn't say no undergrowth.  I said light undergrowth.  Here's a shot of the great big bigfoot filled Pine Barren wilderness.

 

'Light' as in: you can sort of make your way through it? Hm. Here is a link to your quote:

 

http://bigfootforums.com/index.php/topic/52505-wally-walas-bigfoot-suit-and-patty/?p=934568

 

In it you state:

 

 

 

Thick undergrowth not hardly

 

 

So we see now that what you really meant to say was that 'light undergrowth', which is incorrect.

 

OK- I'm sure there are parts of the Pine Barrens where undergrowth is 'light'. However most of it is choked with undergrowth as it is a fire-based ecosystem and there has been fire control there for far too long, just like what is going on in the Rocky Mountains. That is also why its infested with ticks and chiggers. Fire has a way of keeping their numbers down. At any rate, sounds like you've not spent a lot of time there or you would not have said what you did; I've apparently been there than you despite my being from Minnesota.

 

Sorry man but have another look at the altitude satellite shots and as often as not you'll see the bare ground between the trees.  There are many trails both animal and human recreational through  the area.

Edited by Crowlogic
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Guest Bigfoothunter

^^

 

The areial photo hardly covers seven counties. I guess if one limits their areial photo of just Central Park, then someone might believe that all of New York is wooded.

 

"Despite rapid urbanization of surrounding areas, the Pine Barrens remained largely untouched because its sandy soil was unsuitable for growing most crops. Its iron and charcoal deposits did not compete with more readily accessible deposits elsewhere. In 1969, the Pine Barrens averaged a density of 15 people per square mile, compared with 1000 people per square mile in the lands bordering it. With rising environmental concerns at the time, people became alerted to the possible destruction of the Pine Barrens and its aquifer by urban sprawl.

 

State authorities in the region discussed plans to construct a jetport and associated city in the Pine Barrens to alleviate congestion at other major regional airports of the mid-Atlantic. The low cost of land and lower incidence of fog in the area made the plan appealing.[8]

 

Congress created the New Jersey Pinelands National Reserve, the country's first National Reserve, to protect the area under the National Parks and Recreation Act of 1978. The New Jersey Pinelands National Reserve contains approximately 1,100,000 acres (4,500 km2) of land, and occupies 22% of New Jersey's land area, including territory of much of seven counties. Counties affected by the Act are Atlantic, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester and Ocean.

The reserve contains Wharton State Forest, Brendan T. Byrne State Forest, Bass River State Forest, and Penn State Forest.[9] The Pinelands was designated a U.S. Biosphere Reserve by UNESCO in 1983 and an International Biosphere Reserve in 1988.[10]

 

Howard P. Boyd was instrumental in working to preserve the Pine Barrens and educate visitors. He died in December 2011, within the Protection Area of the Pinelands National Reserve.[11]


^^

 

The areial photo hardly covers seven counties. I guess if one limits their areial photo of just Central Park, then someone might believe that all of New York is wooded.

 <%

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I have posted this article as a direct response to the member claiming that this member does not have an accurate description of the NJ Pinelands.  I will say it again the region is not the Amazon, sorry folks it's just not even if a few photo vistas make it seem vast beyond reason.

 

 

Sorry man but have another look at the altitude satellite shots and as often as not you'll see the bare ground between the trees.  There are many trails both animal and human recreational through  the area.

 

It is quite true that there are many trails, roads and firebreaks in the area. That has nothing to do with the undergrowth however. It just means that there are a lot of trails, roads and firebreaks going through a region that has heavy undergrowth. You are reinforcing my perception that you have not spent any time in the area. This is the first year in a while that I have not spent a few weeks there. I've been going out there since 2006 and spending 2-3 weeks in the environment itself. If you go there you will find that I am correct: it has heavy undergrowth.

 

And now for a moderator statement:

 

Let's get back on topic now shall we?

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Guest Crowlogic

^^^OK anything you say.  Forget I know the region first hand and as a summer job in high school I picked blueberries in one of the blueberry plantations in the Barrens.  Sure what do I know, I'll take your word for it.

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