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Bob Gimlin Was Interviewed April 16Th On C2C

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norseman
3 hours ago, Huntster said:

 

Why would 2 Washington guys run to Idaho for Coors when they could easily enjoy Oly or Rainier beer right at home?

 

 

 

 

 

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Catmandoo

Hunster, 'back in the day' when Coors was not sold in Washington, having Coors was a novelty.  Rainier beer ( vitamin R ) was plentiful. Olympia beer had a secretive population of Artesians, more elusive than Sasquatch. However, we called it Oly queer beer due to activities of a brewmaster at a notorious rest stop on I-5.

 

You did good at finding the old advertisements. The ad agency for Rainier was based in Seattle and the ads were funny. Definitely regional humor. When the ad contract shifted to Los Angeles, the ads went to very bad.

Find 'R-BO' and the 'Rainbeers'. The Ivars 'dancing with clams' has a back story. The original ad was a parody of the movie 'Dancing with Wolves"'. Lawyers got involved and they had to re-do the ad. Clem the clam was in a half time activity back when the Seattle Supersonics played at the 'Coliseum'. Clem the clam was able to shoot a hoop, which is no easy task for a bivalve.

 

And now, everyone is making beer. I should make Catmandoo Pale Ale, but i have to drink a lot of coffee.

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norseman

My dad called Oly beer “it’s the water....and nothing more”.

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Arvedis
5 hours ago, Catmandoo said:

having Coors was a novelty.

 

It was mythical on the east coast. We never saw it.  

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Huntster
8 hours ago, Catmandoo said:

Hunster, 'back in the day' when Coors was not sold in Washington, having Coors was a novelty..........

 

Yeah, same in Alaska. Then somebody started distributing the stuff, and the novelty went away. Now it's all about local microbreweries, and the local stuff is very good. 

 

.......Olympia beer had a secretive population of Artesians, more elusive than Sasquatch. However, we called it Oly queer beer due to activities of a brewmaster at a notorious rest stop on I-5.......

 

Yeah, the Olympia artesians were their secret sauce. I didn't know anything about their queers, though. Did he do the unthinkable to their magic water?

 

.........You did good at finding the old advertisements. The ad agency for Rainier was based in Seattle and the ads were funny. Definitely regional humor. When the ad contract shifted to Los Angeles, the ads went to very bad........

 

A few years after arriving in Alaska my beloved wife and I sold our mobile home in Anchorage to a Washingtonian, of which there were many here at the time. He was a Rainier beer freak. Got me going on it. I liked their commercials, too.

 

Everything that ends up in LA ends up very bad.

 

.........And now, everyone is making beer. I should make Catmandoo Pale Ale, but i have to drink a lot of coffee.

 

Wait a minute........why do you have to drink a lot of coffee? I'd certainly try your pale ale, but I do prefer amber ales, myself..........

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Airdale

Back in '74 right after I returned home from the Navy, Coors wasn't available in Montana so got some friends and made a trip to Idaho and loaded up the trunk of my '65 Cutlass with cases of the stuff. I actually preferred the stronger malt liquors and ales and Rainier Ale, the "Green Death", was the favorite. Don't drink much any more and tend to be pretty selective, but do appreciate the abundance of micro brews available.

 

I read an article some twenty-five years ago as the micro brew revolution wound up that related most of the beer before WWII was made using wheat and was heartier than the major brands now. During the war the wheat was rationed and the brewers had to switch over to rice as a primary grain, and the young military vets got used to drinking the lighter stuff so it continued to be made that way. Older guys like my dad who enlisted in the Navy Seabees in '42 when he was thirty-eight got to appreciate any beer they could get out in the Pacific and other theaters so it seemed normal when they returned home.

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Backdoc
18 hours ago, OldMort said:

 

It seems to me that if Gimlin has stated that they tracked seven different sasquatches  prior to the Patty filming,

 

 

OK I'll admit it. I had never heard that before.  When did he start claiming this?   I am assuming these wild claims are only recent.

 

When did Gimlin start to claim they were tracking 7 (?) Bigfeet?

 

 

 

 

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bipedalist

^^^   That sounds more like something MK Davis would have said personally, I would be aghast if this came from Gimlin's lips. 

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OldMort
3 hours ago, Backdoc said:

When did Gimlin start to claim they were tracking 7 (?) Bigfeet?

 

 

There is a reference to it here from earlier in this thread. Not sure how recently it came out.

 

7.thumb.png.a435f9c0034f22271eff19ccfe7cde14.png

 

Gimlin's original Coast to Coast interview is no longer available except for an edited down version which is missing the first part.

From what I recall it had to do with why they were there, their movements and the tracking etc.

Check out the interview with Cantrall and Gimlin a few pages back.

I get the distinct impression that Gimlin likes to tell people exactly what they want to hear...

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Catmandoo
13 hours ago, Airdale said:

Back in '74 right after I returned home from the Navy, Coors wasn't available in Montana so got some friends and made a trip to Idaho and loaded up the trunk of my '65 Cutlass with cases of the stuff.

 

'65 Cutlass.   Was that 4-4-2?  400cid. beer wagon.

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Airdale

No, it was the 330 high compression rated at 320 HP in the old system. Rochester 4-Jet, little brother of the Quadra-Jet, 10.5 compression ratio and it would scoot. It was a great sleeper though, two door, gold with a cream colored top and the stock wire wheel covers that looked like the real thing (still have one of them). I bought it in March of '72 right after the squadron's first WestPac cruise with 64 k on the odometer, sold it in November of '74 with 112 k and it was mostly idle for nine months while deployed on our next WestPac. Left it at home during that time and my older brother drove it enough to keep everything circulating. We did trips to Yosemite most weekends during spring and summer, 280 mile round trip from NAS Lemoore, and I made a number of trips home to Helena on leave and even four day holidays, a 2,400 mile round trip. Even driving 80 plus MPH (no speed limits in Nevada and Montana then), it got 18 MPG on premium fuel at $0.35 per gallon. Those were the days!

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