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Bob Gimlin Was Interviewed April 16Th On C2C

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norseman
3 hours ago, Huntster said:

 

Why would 2 Washington guys run to Idaho for Coors when they could easily enjoy Oly or Rainier beer right at home?

 

 

 

 

 

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Catmandoo

Hunster, 'back in the day' when Coors was not sold in Washington, having Coors was a novelty.  Rainier beer ( vitamin R ) was plentiful. Olympia beer had a secretive population of Artesians, more elusive than Sasquatch. However, we called it Oly queer beer due to activities of a brewmaster at a notorious rest stop on I-5.

 

You did good at finding the old advertisements. The ad agency for Rainier was based in Seattle and the ads were funny. Definitely regional humor. When the ad contract shifted to Los Angeles, the ads went to very bad.

Find 'R-BO' and the 'Rainbeers'. The Ivars 'dancing with clams' has a back story. The original ad was a parody of the movie 'Dancing with Wolves"'. Lawyers got involved and they had to re-do the ad. Clem the clam was in a half time activity back when the Seattle Supersonics played at the 'Coliseum'. Clem the clam was able to shoot a hoop, which is no easy task for a bivalve.

 

And now, everyone is making beer. I should make Catmandoo Pale Ale, but i have to drink a lot of coffee.

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norseman

My dad called Oly beer “it’s the water....and nothing more”.

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Arvedis
5 hours ago, Catmandoo said:

having Coors was a novelty.

 

It was mythical on the east coast. We never saw it.  

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Huntster
8 hours ago, Catmandoo said:

Hunster, 'back in the day' when Coors was not sold in Washington, having Coors was a novelty..........

 

Yeah, same in Alaska. Then somebody started distributing the stuff, and the novelty went away. Now it's all about local microbreweries, and the local stuff is very good. 

 

.......Olympia beer had a secretive population of Artesians, more elusive than Sasquatch. However, we called it Oly queer beer due to activities of a brewmaster at a notorious rest stop on I-5.......

 

Yeah, the Olympia artesians were their secret sauce. I didn't know anything about their queers, though. Did he do the unthinkable to their magic water?

 

.........You did good at finding the old advertisements. The ad agency for Rainier was based in Seattle and the ads were funny. Definitely regional humor. When the ad contract shifted to Los Angeles, the ads went to very bad........

 

A few years after arriving in Alaska my beloved wife and I sold our mobile home in Anchorage to a Washingtonian, of which there were many here at the time. He was a Rainier beer freak. Got me going on it. I liked their commercials, too.

 

Everything that ends up in LA ends up very bad.

 

.........And now, everyone is making beer. I should make Catmandoo Pale Ale, but i have to drink a lot of coffee.

 

Wait a minute........why do you have to drink a lot of coffee? I'd certainly try your pale ale, but I do prefer amber ales, myself..........

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Airdale

Back in '74 right after I returned home from the Navy, Coors wasn't available in Montana so got some friends and made a trip to Idaho and loaded up the trunk of my '65 Cutlass with cases of the stuff. I actually preferred the stronger malt liquors and ales and Rainier Ale, the "Green Death", was the favorite. Don't drink much any more and tend to be pretty selective, but do appreciate the abundance of micro brews available.

 

I read an article some twenty-five years ago as the micro brew revolution wound up that related most of the beer before WWII was made using wheat and was heartier than the major brands now. During the war the wheat was rationed and the brewers had to switch over to rice as a primary grain, and the young military vets got used to drinking the lighter stuff so it continued to be made that way. Older guys like my dad who enlisted in the Navy Seabees in '42 when he was thirty-eight got to appreciate any beer they could get out in the Pacific and other theaters so it seemed normal when they returned home.

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Backdoc
18 hours ago, OldMort said:

 

It seems to me that if Gimlin has stated that they tracked seven different sasquatches  prior to the Patty filming,

 

 

OK I'll admit it. I had never heard that before.  When did he start claiming this?   I am assuming these wild claims are only recent.

 

When did Gimlin start to claim they were tracking 7 (?) Bigfeet?

 

 

 

 

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bipedalist

^^^   That sounds more like something MK Davis would have said personally, I would be aghast if this came from Gimlin's lips. 

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OldMort
3 hours ago, Backdoc said:

When did Gimlin start to claim they were tracking 7 (?) Bigfeet?

 

 

There is a reference to it here from earlier in this thread. Not sure how recently it came out.

 

7.thumb.png.a435f9c0034f22271eff19ccfe7cde14.png

 

Gimlin's original Coast to Coast interview is no longer available except for an edited down version which is missing the first part.

From what I recall it had to do with why they were there, their movements and the tracking etc.

Check out the interview with Cantrall and Gimlin a few pages back.

I get the distinct impression that Gimlin likes to tell people exactly what they want to hear...

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Catmandoo
13 hours ago, Airdale said:

Back in '74 right after I returned home from the Navy, Coors wasn't available in Montana so got some friends and made a trip to Idaho and loaded up the trunk of my '65 Cutlass with cases of the stuff.

 

'65 Cutlass.   Was that 4-4-2?  400cid. beer wagon.

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Airdale

No, it was the 330 high compression rated at 320 HP in the old system. Rochester 4-Jet, little brother of the Quadra-Jet, 10.5 compression ratio and it would scoot. It was a great sleeper though, two door, gold with a cream colored top and the stock wire wheel covers that looked like the real thing (still have one of them). I bought it in March of '72 right after the squadron's first WestPac cruise with 64 k on the odometer, sold it in November of '74 with 112 k and it was mostly idle for nine months while deployed on our next WestPac. Left it at home during that time and my older brother drove it enough to keep everything circulating. We did trips to Yosemite most weekends during spring and summer, 280 mile round trip from NAS Lemoore, and I made a number of trips home to Helena on leave and even four day holidays, a 2,400 mile round trip. Even driving 80 plus MPH (no speed limits in Nevada and Montana then), it got 18 MPG on premium fuel at $0.35 per gallon. Those were the days!

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Daniel Perez

I will have to listen to the Coast To Coast interview with Bob Gimlin. When I interviewed Bob Titmus in a recorded conversation by phone around 1991 for my booklet, Bigfoot At Bluff Creek, (1994 and revised with bibliography 2003) he told me that the first full day up there, he walked completely by the P-G filmsite and did not find it until later. He never mentioned to me that any of the tracks were covered by cardboard or by bark from the trees but then again I never asked the question, to the best of my knowledge. But keep in mind before Bob Titmus arrived on the scene Lyle Laverty and his "timber management crew" were there to inspect and photograph some of the trackway, so presumably he may have removed anything covering the tracks. Lyle Laverty was there on Monday, October 23, 1967. Titmus never mentioned he had any tape measure but in lieu of that he may have just broken a stick as his gauge and measured when he arrived home. Don't know.

 

One thing to keep in mind is the trackway was still very identifiable through June of 1968, when John Green and Jim McClarin were there, and they based his recreation film on the remaining tracks. The soil in that country is quite interesting, as it holds tracks for quite a bit of time, and I recall Steven Streufert mentioning the same thing to me about tracks of people being identifiable many months after the fact.

 

Why Roger Patterson never bothered to preserve the footprint evidence, even today, remains a mystery, and since we did not know him personally, we have little concept as to how he thought things through. Perhaps he felt the phone calls to British Columbia would bring in the tracking dogs a little later and the whole mystery would be over. Doubtful if they ever expected rain.

 

Many of us have been in that country and I will tell you personally I have seen some of the heaviest rains in that country, where visibility ten feet in front of you is very difficult.

 

And finally, after getting access to the BBC films from a trusted source, in Roger Patterson's OWN WORDS, he states they were there a week and one half, meaning 7 days plus 3 or 7 days plus 4, take your pick. Ten or eleven days.  So that locks in the time frame in which they were there and in the back country that can seem like a lot of time.

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hiflier

Hi Daniel, when you conducted your phone interview with Lyle Laverty in 1992 did you ask him about his own encounter incident with Bigfoot. I have rad, for get where, that he had a personal encounter before the time of the PGF. I 'm also curious about one other thing: He was a timber cruiser at the time of the PGF event and so was working for the stakeholders regarding sales and mapping out areas for harvesting. Do you think his photographing and the subsequent publishing those photographs was frowned upon? In other words, do you think there was pressure on him to downplay the PGF incident and influence his public dialogue to this day? After so much time has passed since that interview do you think he would ever agree to another at his age of 76?

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Daniel Perez

No, Lyle Laverty never had an encounter with Bigfoot but may have seen Bigfoot evidence, namely the footprints associated with the P-G film and an unusual nest seen near Scorpion Creek. Bobo Fay told me to ask him about this, which I did, and in my interview with him and published on YouTube, he said he never had one, so I wonder about where Bobo is getting his information. Certainly not from the primary source. Someone very close to Bobo told me point blank that Bobo has a credibility problem.

 

My interview with Lyle Laverty was uploaded to YouTube and you should be able to find it with ease. This was the second interview, conducted in 2017. The first one came in 1991 or 1992, when it cost me a small fortune to call long distance on a land line.

 

Laverty's photos first saw daylight a great many years after the fact. Shot October 23, 1967 and first published in 1978 in John Green's book. I can't think of any other venue where they were published before 1978, so correct me if I am wrong. No, I don't think there was any pressure by his employer at the time, in 1967. In fact, I don't think they ever knew about it and if they did, it was way after the fact.

 

I have interviewed him twice by phone and both times he was very willing and eager to talk about the event. He harbored great skepticism then and even today about the incident, essentially in summary: we (the timber management crew) were there all Summer long and into Fall and then Mr. Patterson comes in and has a sighting and gets a film just like that. So yes, that was a head shaker for him and he expressed that point in my interview. He also pointed out that he never saw Patterson or Gimlin or the truck they were in. Don't know what to say with regard to that point.

Hoping someone might send me the file of Bob Gimlin's interview on Coast to Coast. My e-mail: perez952@sbcglobal.net

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hiflier
Posted (edited)

Thank you, Daniel. Good stuff. In the 1992 video there was a point made about Mr. Laverty taking the photos on October 21st, the Saturday immediately following the date of the PGF. So I'm a bit uncertain whether Laverty took the photographs on Saturday or the following Monday October, 23. Would you be kind enough to clarify that, please. Not that it matters much since the footprints were around for some time after the 20th so this is just to keep my own storyline straight. The confusion for me lies in Laverty's 1992 interview where he said he and his team were camped out in the vicinity of the PGF site but he didn't remember it raining. I was under the impression that it rained pretty hard early morning of the 21st. Curious that he didn't remember. Thanks.

Edited by hiflier

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