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hiflier

SRN- The Sasquatch Research Network

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Caenus
2 hours ago, southwestjess said:

 

Hey Caenus! Virtual high five! We’re recent transplants to Flag from western PA.

 

Welcome. Best squatching in the country a bit south of you at the Mogollon. People do not recognize that yet, but they will! ;)

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hiflier
5 hours ago, SWWASAS said:

Someone,  I think it the BFRO, identified I-84 East of Troutdale having the most road crossings of any interstate Highway in the country.    Mile post 27 is often mentioned.   It is near a fish hatchery right on the Columbia and a canyon goes to the South up into the Gorge cliffs above.         Someone in the Portland area, that just wants to drive might just drive I-84 after dark a few times back and forth through that area.    Another road hot spot in Washington state is the road that comes from the East and goes into Ocean Shores WA.   I think the highway number is 107.     That road has frequent crossing sightings.    So in every state there must be road crossing hot spots.     The data base people would be the best ones to figure out where to drive waiting for more recent reports.   

 

And that is why databases can be valuable tools of someone's research. I have the understanding too that Rt. 12 going East of I-5 has had a bunck of road encounters as well as 101 in Grays Harbor- especially in winter. And I agree about someone taking the time to scout those places. In my book, and even before, I have mentioned taking these kinds of drives after researching an area that has relatively frequent road crossings, tking a picnic lunch, parking on the side of the road, and just hanging out with some type of image capture equipment.  It is all about upping the odds of having a visual sighting and recording it if possible. It just takes people. Six people is great- 16 is better because they can spread out on roads over a larger area. I think it was BobbyO who zeroed in on the Grays Harbor area.

 

There have been reports in the past on roads generally North of Aberdeen and Hoaquiam West of Matlock.  I have proposed that region is a traditional Sasquatch mating area based on sightings of female Sasquatches seemingly a generation apart from each other (10 years maybe?) but who knows for sure. Some kind of study involving sightings in an area that seem to be on a 10 to 15 year cycle might be interesting?

Edited by hiflier

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hiflier
41 minutes ago, hiflier said:

I have the understanding too that Rt. 12 going East of I-5 has had a bunck of road encounters

 

Apologies everyone, I meant to say WEST of I-5.......

 

And please excuse the typo (bunck? LOL).

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Catmandoo

hiflier, participants in a SRN need to leave a vehicle at times. I monitor what I call 'parallel logging roads'. Abandoned logging roads/spurs typically running alongside well used logging roads/highways.  More or less 20' below the road. Somewhat overgrown, they are animal trails for critters that want to avoid vehicles/humans. Takes time to find them and time to monitor them. One does not have to go very far from a vehicle.

Monitoring for road crossings takes a little bit of hardware for night time checking. A good LED accessory back-up light controlled by a remote switch on the dash. At night, a Sasquatch will wait at the side of a road for traffic to pass. You can't see it in your tail lights. Turn on the back-up light. I have seen this. The road was a paved 2 lane in a National Forest area. What to look for?  Day time road checks indicated a 'tire burn-out' patch in this area. Many times, a motor vehicle operator will brake strongly to stop when a bear/deer/ porcupine is in the roadway. Easy to tell a braking mark from a burn-out. After stopping for a critter, who burns rubber to get away?  Looking at the width of the rubber burn marks will indicate that it was not a 'muscle car' doing  a burn-out in the middle of no where. Rubber burn marks do not last long before weather alters them.

 

As for lights, a single unit works well and helps when you are backing up at a camping area so you avoid damaging your tail light assemblies.  An LED light bar across the back of the vehicle that enables one to be seen by the International Space Station is a bit of overkill.

Another comment on west coast underbrush. Norseman posted good images. Good hiding places. Ground snap noises. Very gooey traveling. We have a shrub called Devil's Club. Woody stems, as thick as your thumb, with bad spines that will tear you up. Difficult/impossible to walk through patches of this stuff. One needs a spare unit of blood in their first aid kits when around Devil's Club.

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hiflier
5 hours ago, Catmandoo said:

hiflier, participants in a SRN need to leave a vehicle at times. I monitor what I call 'parallel logging roads'. Abandoned logging roads/spurs typically running alongside well used logging roads/highways.  More or less 20' below the road. Somewhat overgrown, they are animal trails for critters that want to avoid vehicles/humans. Takes time to find them and time to monitor them. One does not have to go very far from a vehicle.

 

Of course, Catmandoo, and no one is saying that a group member cannot do just what you are saying. But not everyone is comfortable doing that. A woman may not want to leave her vehicle and enter a remote wooded section somewhere along a road. A seasoned researcher might though because they know about parallel trails. I wrote about such trails in my book. The SRN is a way for anyone to be involved even if they are a senior citizen, or someone who has health, or physical issues that may not allow them to do such searches. Even someone who simply has a general apprehension about going into a wooded area alone can still be a part of this of an SRN by simply canvassing a road.

 

The important thing is to encourage people to out there looking as soon after a call about a visual sighting comes in as possible and therefore be part of the solution. People may not have time to do more than grab a camera and go; the important thing being that they go. If an area around a sighting is going to be monitored one can assume that a BF will not be remaining inside the search perimeter by using a parallel trail. I think it safe to assume that it will prefer to go back to where it feels safe which could be 20 miles or more from the encounter location. Depending on the are it may HAVE to cross a road in order to do that. If every Sasquatch hid when a car went by then there would be NO sightings on a road and we wouldn't know that they do in fact do that- they DO cross roads. They DO stand along side them. They ARE seen doing either of those things in both daytime and nighttime.

 

If an SRN group has a dozen folks involved then one member could park, get out, and monitor a gully that is crossed over by a bridge while another member drives up and down or back and forth in whatever direction a compass dictates. If someone is fine getting out of their vehicle to search in the woods then fine- if not then that's fine too. A man or woman home by themselves with a child can still be involved and they do not have to go into any forested areas at all. As far as I am concerned an SRN is all inclusive. It doesn't have to be populated with only seasoned woods people. Someone from 'the city' who has never even camped is certainly capable of driving down a road with dash cam. Hundreds of people or thousands of people across the U.S. and Canada who belong to their local SRN's will up the odds of getting a good visual record of a Sasquatch. That is what an SRN is for: Getting as many folks as possible out there after a sighting looking in as quickly and as easily a fashion as possible. 

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