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Lake County Bigfooot

The decline of interest in Sasquatch

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Oonjerah

Horses, cattle, goats, sheep, hogs ... all are good to eat.

But they're very often penned within sight of a house ... there's people with dogs on watch.

At night, downwind, Bigfoot knows how to sneak, I've heard ... grab an unwary hog or sheep, & run for the hills.

 

Since we outnumber them & don't hide, Bf must know way more about us than we do about them.

 

As for decline of interest, I have notion about that.

 

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hiflier
11 hours ago, BlackRockBigfoot said:

Off to see if I can find any accounts of horses being attacked while being ridden

 

John Green's database has a couple of accounts. One was with a horse and buggy.

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msouliere
On 8/22/2018 at 11:40 AM, hiflier said:

The seeming lack of interest is also a perspective of what is on the internet- or should I say what is not on the internet. We know stuff is happening, it is just not being publicly forthcoming. For instance, the results from any testing being done, or waitin to still be done by Dr. Todd Disotell on samples from Derek Randle's Oregon nesting site. Dr. Disotell is supposed to be a speaker sometime over the Labor Day Weekend at a conference being presented in Portland, Maine at Loren Coleman's International Cryptozoology Museum; something I will miss unfortunately because I am on the road when that conference goes on. 

 

Hello hiflier--

I was able to attend the conference, and heard Dr. Disotell's talk.  I did a post about the first day of the conference on my Strange Maine blog, and will hopefully get the 2nd day typed up and posted this weekend.  Basically, what he had to say was tremendously exciting.  I'll cut and paste that part of the post and tweak it a little for all you guys here (and add a few details that I know you'll be interested in too):

 

His talk focused on the potential for researchers to utilize the recent advances in DNA technology to accomplish species surveys. Using environmental DNA drawn from topsoil, local bodies of water, etc, labs can now determine what species are in a given area, and how long ago they were there in the case of past or transient populations.

Of course we leave traces of our DNA everywhere we go, and so does every other species on earth. This new methodology, environmental DNA metabarcoding, is transforming how we survey animal and plant communities. With this and other tools, Disotell urges us: "Those of us in the cryptozoology field need to do way better than we have done up to now."  Up until now, he states, he has seen "zero data to convince [him] of the existence of legendary cryptids," but he is hopeful that access to new DNA technology will advance efforts, especially as the cost has plummeted now.  (in answer to your question, hiflier, it sounds like either they haven't crunched the samples you refer to yet, or the data turned out not to be anything indicating an unknown hominid.  He was aware of why people were asking about his results up to now.)



In other words -- work hard, learn well, and use new tools -- and always keep in mind that DNA is the keystone of species identification.

 

The process involves utilizing either local water samples or local dirt samples, and filtering them to separate all the trace DNA types present or having passed through a given area.  In the case of dirt or physical debris from the topsoil, etc, the material is pulverized for analysis.  He mentioned that rather than doing footprint casts, it would be more useful to cull the topsoil from the area of the print and submit that for testing, as it would undoubtedly contain trace DNA from whatever had left the print.

 

He said that he is willing to do analysis for people, but "don't just mail me material."  Initiating contact with him (his lab) to find out parameters and costs in advance would be the way to go.  He said that the process costs a couple grand, but out of that you get hundreds of results, whereas the old systems cost even more and then only gave you results for a single physical specimen sample.  You get a full picture of all wildlife, etc, that traverses or inhabits that region now and in the past (depending on how deep the sample digs).

 

I hope that's helpful!  I had a chance to give my own talk about what I've learned about Bigfoot in Maine from the eyewitnesses I've spoken to for the first time, which was an interesting exercise in summarizing a diverse quantity of reports in a wide range of eras into a digestible whole.

 

Cheers from Portland,

Michelle Souliere

 

Quote

 

 

IMG_7261_Todd-Disotell.JPG

Edited by msouliere
typo
  • Upvote 4

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hiflier

Thank you, Michelle. Yes, Dr. Disotell has a GoFundMe account running to help offset the cost of the e-DNA testing expenses. I will be in touch with you at some point in the near future as there is much that we might discuss. And thank you for the update and info from the Conference. And BTW 'The Green Hand' ROCKS! I used to go to the ICZM when it was around the corner from you. My son actually purchase a year membership for me one Christmas a while back. He also presented me with a postcard of a Slick Airways plane along with a Slick Airways brass button from uniform either worn by one of the flight attendants or a member of the flight crew. Yeah, my son is a pretty cool guy :) I will be in touch.

 

And welcome to the Forum!

Edited by hiflier
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gigantor
On 10/11/2018 at 12:26 PM, msouliere said:

He mentioned that rather than doing footprint casts, it would be more useful to cull the topsoil from the area of the print and submit that for testing, as it would undoubtedly contain trace DNA from whatever had left the print.

 

 

That is exciting news, thank you for posting this.

 

We have a member who has obtained original casts from the cripple foot Bossburg trackway (AtlantiS). I wonder if he would donate one for testing?

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ShadowBorn

If you can get DNA from water sample off a creeks this will be a great avenue for searching an area of a known creature. If I had a couple thousand I could of send him sample's of DNA where I know that these creatures have drank water from. Even bathed in when it has been real hot and the skeeters have been a real bother. There have been a few hidden water holes that I have found where tracks have been found.

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NatFoot
On 10/13/2018 at 11:49 AM, ShadowBorn said:

If you can get DNA from water sample off a creeks this will be a great avenue for searching an area of a known creature. If I had a couple thousand I could of send him sample's of DNA where I know that these creatures have drank water from. Even bathed in when it has been real hot and the skeeters have been a real bother. There have been a few hidden water holes that I have found where tracks have been found.

 

Somebody man up and send him some money.

 

Or, If you are serious about them being identified, save up for a couple months and do it yourself.

 

If you've seen them drinking and bathing, you're in the top 1%. Help us.

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hiflier

I am of the opinion that the GoFundMe thing that Dr. Disotell has been promoting is just for public consumption. I think that there is money already being thrown at this and the GoFundMe announcements are to make people think that there is going to be a long wait for any results. My gut tells me that the GoFundMe campaign isn't really needed here. I think it is mentioned to keep people from pounding on his door. The idea of waiting for funding instills a level of patience in believers that otherwise wouldn't be there. In other words, it is hard for me to think that something this important is going to languish because there isn't a wealthy proponent out there that wouldn't fund it. Just my humble opinion. 

Edited by hiflier

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norseman
On 10/12/2018 at 11:37 AM, gigantor said:

 

That is exciting news, thank you for posting this.

 

We have a member who has obtained original casts from the cripple foot Bossburg trackway (AtlantiS). I wonder if he would donate one for testing?

 

I wonder if the casts are too old? Almost 50 years....

On 10/11/2018 at 9:26 AM, msouliere said:

Hello hiflier--

I was able to attend the conference, and heard Dr. Disotell's talk.  I did a post about the first day of the conference on my Strange Maine blog, and will hopefully get the 2nd day typed up and posted this weekend.  Basically, what he had to say was tremendously exciting.  I'll cut and paste that part of the post and tweak it a little for all you guys here (and add a few details that I know you'll be interested in too):

 

His talk focused on the potential for researchers to utilize the recent advances in DNA technology to accomplish species surveys. Using environmental DNA drawn from topsoil, local bodies of water, etc, labs can now determine what species are in a given area, and how long ago they were there in the case of past or transient populations.

Of course we leave traces of our DNA everywhere we go, and so does every other species on earth. This new methodology, environmental DNA metabarcoding, is transforming how we survey animal and plant communities. With this and other tools, Disotell urges us: "Those of us in the cryptozoology field need to do way better than we have done up to now."  Up until now, he states, he has seen "zero data to convince [him] of the existence of legendary cryptids," but he is hopeful that access to new DNA technology will advance efforts, especially as the cost has plummeted now.  (in answer to your question, hiflier, it sounds like either they haven't crunched the samples you refer to yet, or the data turned out not to be anything indicating an unknown hominid.  He was aware of why people were asking about his results up to now.)



In other words -- work hard, learn well, and use new tools -- and always keep in mind that DNA is the keystone of species identification.

 

The process involves utilizing either local water samples or local dirt samples, and filtering them to separate all the trace DNA types present or having passed through a given area.  In the case of dirt or physical debris from the topsoil, etc, the material is pulverized for analysis.  He mentioned that rather than doing footprint casts, it would be more useful to cull the topsoil from the area of the print and submit that for testing, as it would undoubtedly contain trace DNA from whatever had left the print.

 

He said that he is willing to do analysis for people, but "don't just mail me material."  Initiating contact with him (his lab) to find out parameters and costs in advance would be the way to go.  He said that the process costs a couple grand, but out of that you get hundreds of results, whereas the old systems cost even more and then only gave you results for a single physical specimen sample.  You get a full picture of all wildlife, etc, that traverses or inhabits that region now and in the past (depending on how deep the sample digs).

 

I hope that's helpful!  I had a chance to give my own talk about what I've learned about Bigfoot in Maine from the eyewitnesses I've spoken to for the first time, which was an interesting exercise in summarizing a diverse quantity of reports in a wide range of eras into a digestible whole.

 

Cheers from Portland,

Michelle Souliere

 

 

IMG_7261_Todd-Disotell.JPG

 

I have a sneaking suspicion that this will get us our answers sooner as opposed to later! Which is good!

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