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BobbyO

Camping - Is this the best chance to see Sasquatch ?

Camping - Is this the best chance to see Sasquatch ?  

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BobbyO
9 hours ago, NCBFr said:

 

If you combine BFRO reports with missing 911 cases I am thinking Yosemite.

 

I actually done this before and looked for correlation, at least i started doing it anyway then typically i got led elsewhere.

 

Got to say i wasn't overly happy with what i found neither especially as i like to walk in the forests of the PNW if you get my drift hahaha

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Huntster
2 hours ago, BobbyO said:

........Only 17 reports in the database for "Hunting" from the CA Counties of Siskiyou, Trinity, Del Norte, Humboldt and Shasta, and OR's Josephine, Coos, Klamath, Curry and Jackson..........

 

I must say that I’m disappointingly surprised. I would think that there would be many more.

 

........82% of the Reports are from above 2,000ft in elevation > 71% of Reports above 3,000ft in elevation.......

 

That is interesting, and it fits with the hunting pattern of deer being in the high country until snow pushes them down. At least this shows that the hunters are up there after them, and the sasquatch reports might indicate that sasquatches might be as well. 

 

Thanks for the queries, Bobby!

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SWWASAS
4 hours ago, Huntster said:

 

I must say that I’m disappointingly surprised. I would think that there would be many more.

 

 

 

 

That is interesting, and it fits with the hunting pattern of deer being in the high country until snow pushes them down. At least this shows that the hunters are up there after them, and the sasquatch reports might indicate that sasquatches might be as well. 

 

Thanks for the queries,

That is curious.      I have deer in my yard year round (as recently as day before yesterday)  and I live at about 270 Feet elevation.   Apparently they did not get the memo.    One was chowing down on my tomato plants after dark and I had to shoo it away.        Since BF are in the high country near here,  maybe the deer have decided come down to mingle with humans.     Most of the ones I see during the summer are does with fawns.      They like to bed down in the back behind some trees.   They must keep coming year after year because I have them all the time.  

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Huntster
24 minutes ago, SWWASAS said:

........Most of the ones I see during the summer are does with fawns.      They like to bed down in the back behind some trees.   They must keep coming year after year because I have them all the time.  

 

I think that’s your key. All ungulates have differing seasonal ranges, and it is usually different for males and females. Then, in the fall, they come together for the rut.

 

Caribou cows lead the spring migrations to the calving ranges. Some herds are extremely loyal to these calving areas. Bulls tend to generally follow, but once the bugs come out, bulls go up high with the sheep and hang out on ridges with the wind in their faces or on the last melting snow fields.

 

Bull moose also tend to follow greening vegetation as springtime crawls uphill, but cows with calves tend to prefer premium escape terrain; water. When standing in 3’ of water with her belly still in the air, bears and wolves are starting to swim, and moose can quite literally kick them to death. 

E62D1483-6796-4230-BAF6-533A82F0CB73.jpeg

845CEF64-19C6-481D-B83F-2BEB8598D442.jpeg

42FACF6D-BAEE-45D8-9A12-18EFF1693330.jpeg

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Wolfjewel

OMG — there’s nothing like a mother moose! Bear, turn tail and run for your life!

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Huntster

Indeed, they’re as dangerous as sow grizzlies. 

 

Those pics were were shot by Michio Hoshino in Denali National Park in the 1980’s. Michio was a Japanese born nature photographer who specialized in Alaskan photography. He was killed in 1996 in Siberia by a brown bear that raided a large camp of people in the dead of night.

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bipedalist
On 9/24/2018 at 1:51 PM, Huntster said:

 

I think that’s your key. All ungulates have differing seasonal ranges, and it is usually different for males and females. Then, in the fall, they come together for the rut.

 

Caribou cows lead the spring migrations to the calving ranges. Some herds are extremely loyal to these calving areas. Bulls tend to generally follow, but once the bugs come out, bulls go up high with the sheep and hang out on ridges with the wind in their faces or on the last melting snow fields.

 

Bull moose also tend to follow greening vegetation as springtime crawls uphill, but cows with calves tend to prefer premium escape terrain; water. When standing in 3’ of water with her belly still in the air, bears and wolves are starting to swim, and moose can quite literally kick them to death. 

E62D1483-6796-4230-BAF6-533A82F0CB73.jpeg

845CEF64-19C6-481D-B83F-2BEB8598D442.jpeg

42FACF6D-BAEE-45D8-9A12-18EFF1693330.jpeg

 

And based on the number of moron tourists kicked in the teeth by elk and even white-tailed deer not to mention gored by bison, trust me you would not want to be kicked by a moose it would probably be the last thing on your incomplete bucket list you never got to check off.  It would almost be as bad as being kicked by a giraffe but few live to tell about that. 

Edited by bipedalist

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Huntster
26 minutes ago, bipedalist said:

......you would not want to be kicked by a moose it would probably be the last thing on your incomplete bucket list you never got to check off.......

 

I came awfully close once. She was just a few feet away, hackles up, ears down, and pissed off. I had bailed off my snowmobile and was standing in waist deep snow and in a tangle of brush, she was just 15’ away, and it looked like she was about to do the dance on my snowmobile. I fired a warning shot above her head with my 357 mag, and she didn’t even indicate that she heard it.

 

That sidearm suddenly seemed so small and insignificant...........

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Caenus

So I have a monkey wrench to throw in here...

 

Based on stats, the number of people in the woods equates to a higher likelihood of sightings provided the same number of squatches are in the woods...That means more sightings in the months that folks camp, which the stats seems to play out.  

 

Well,  I just spent most of the weekend in the woods, in what I guestimated would be a very high probability area based on my previous outings.  Keep in mind I have spent 2-3 weekends per month in my research area with fairly consistent signs, sounds and pseudo contact (as in things moving around camp).

 

So I have this brand new thermal and separate night sight...spend the weekend out and don’t see, or hear, even elk or deer.  Let alone coyontes or racoons or pseudo contact.

 

Either I completely bolo’d on estimated contact or something changed.  Thoughts?

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Catmandoo

Camping: what are the seasonal variations in your area? Lots of people camping in the summer. School starts, colder weather, more darkness and less humans and less reports. How many summertime reports from campers are bogus?

What is the food and water availability for prey and predators? Especially water. Did a hunting season start?  I assume that you have an animal inventory for your area including birds. Did the birds leave? Crows/ravens/Blue Jay/camp robber/road runner?   Do the birds follow you? They will give up your location quickly. Have squirrels/chipmunks?

 

You listed animals that you did not see. What creatures did you see.? Hear animal alarm calls? Or was it quiet?

I am guessing that your NV sight has a laser. What is the range of the laser? The laser light might be out of its 'sales brochure' spectral distribution. You might be alerting animals of your location. Anyway to use a different light source for your night sight to check emissions?

 

Did you do  a campfire scenario?

 

You may have scared them.  Were you alone? They moved for food. Do you have a dog and if so was it acting normal?  Use the same vehicle?  Time for a seasonal check on your motorcycle perhaps.  

Edited by Catmandoo

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Huntster
13 hours ago, Caenus said:

.......So I have this brand new thermal and separate night sight...spend the weekend out and don’t see, or hear, even elk or deer.  Let alone coyontes or racoons or pseudo contact.

 

Either I completely bolo’d on estimated contact or something changed.  Thoughts?

 

That’s why they call it hunting and not killing. If I got a consolation check for every hunting trip I went on and only got my own blood on my clothes, I could buy enough meat for a family of four to get fat on. And that includes the fact that I saw moose, bear, and/or caribou on many of those unsuccessful hunts. I just couldn’t take a shot for one reason or a dozen.

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SWWASAS
On 11/6/2018 at 7:33 PM, Caenus said:

So I have a monkey wrench to throw in here...

 

Based on stats, the number of people in the woods equates to a higher likelihood of sightings provided the same number of squatches are in the woods...That means more sightings in the months that folks camp, which the stats seems to play out.  

 

Well,  I just spent most of the weekend in the woods, in what I guestimated would be a very high probability area based on my previous outings.  Keep in mind I have spent 2-3 weekends per month in my research area with fairly consistent signs, sounds and pseudo contact (as in things moving around camp).

 

So I have this brand new thermal and separate night sight...spend the weekend out and don’t see, or hear, even elk or deer.  Let alone coyontes or racoons or pseudo contact.

 

Either I completely bolo’d on estimated contact or something changed.  Thoughts?

I hate to throw another monkey wrench into the probability of sightings but you mentioned the word that reduces the chance if BF encounters.    "Weekends"    When my research area was active there was no activity on weekends when there were people other than myself out there.   That has led me to believe that BF naturally avoid the days in which humans are likely to be present to move around in daylight hours.    I got so I would not even do field work on weekends.    Too many hikers, shooters, mountain bike riders etc.     Perhaps since most BF research is done on weekends (people work)  that forces researchers into weekend daylight hours or camping situations so they can do night work.       If BF naturally avoid movement during daylight hours when humans are around, weekend activity would naturally mostly happen at night.     My experience has made me wonder why some conclude that BF research can only be done at night.    But perhaps those who have concluded that, are rarely available during the week and that has worked for them.   .  

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MindSquatch

I don't go hiking on weekends either because I want to make sure I'm the only one out there. I mostly stay off trail to add to the isolation. The area where I go hiking I have never come across anyone. Right after a big storm is a good time to go along with early morning and evening. Even during a big storm is a great time to go but you have to be extra careful and on guard. Going during the storms intensifies the wildness of being out there and could greatly increase your chances of coming upon a Bigfoot. Problem is with that is you'll probably surprise them as they don't expect any humans out during a storm and they won't be able to hear you so well with the rain falling with swollen creeks and waterfalls. Going during the storms can be spooky, but the soul gets thrilled to the core.

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MIB

I see it a little differently.   I'm not arguing that weekends are not "less good" or anything like that, but if you want to catch fish the first requirement is to have a line in the water.   I'd say go out EVERY opportunity, not just the best one, else you're letting time slip by that you'll never get back.   You're sure not going to find bigfoot sitting on the couch.    Get out there and do *something*, anything.  If you don't think it's productive for focused research, fine, cut firewood, fish, hike, take pictures of daisies or tweety birds, sitting by a campfire, reading books, whatever .. but be out there rather than at home.

 

MIB

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Huntster

When I hunt, I prefer to go for at least a week, which usually results in a good 4 days of pure hunting, not trail busting, camp setup/breaking, travel, etc. Ten days beats a week, and two weeks virtually guarantees a successful hunt.

 

Arriving in the hunt area mid-week and/or 3 days before opening day usually provides a good camp site, before the weekend crowd gets there, forcing them to move on.

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