Jump to content
BobbyO

Camping - Is this the best chance to see Sasquatch ?

Camping - Is this the best chance to see Sasquatch ?  

37 members have voted

You do not have permission to vote in this poll, or see the poll results. Please sign in or register to vote in this poll.

Recommended Posts

SWWASAS

I do read reports.  The advantage I have seen in reports from camping is camping repeatedly with more or less the same small group in some remote camp seems to draw in BF.    Seems like BF feels comfortable enough in that situation to come into camp and explore.    Some reports are of BF watching the humans around the campfire as if the humans are entertainment.   Joe points out that most camp exploration happens after the humans conk out for the night.    But statistically I would think that random encounters with hunters or hikers would happen with higher frequency than camping contact.    However statistics can be misleading.    An individual looking for an encounter cannot be everywhere at once awaiting the chance blunder into BF.   So if some area is active, it seems more likely to me that individual humans camping in that area may bring in the BF curious about humans.    However, my former research area was State forest and remote camping was prohibited in likely spots by signage.       The only campground there had been closed by the state.    I suppose a back packer could have slipped in there, camped and be out before authorities knew it.    Just the fact that campground was closed when the area was very active with BF makes me suspicious.   There was no talk of lack of funding or use related to the closing like there normally is with a campground closing.     It was a primitive site with pit toilets and no utilities.   .       It was just closed without prior notice and the access road blocked off.  I regret not talking to the campground hosts.   At the time I did not think they would admit having seen anything.      One of my encounters was within a half mile of the campground.   If humans are entertaining it was likely that BF was there watching them in the campground.  

Edited by SWWASAS
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Catmandoo
BFF Donor
On 9/7/2018 at 11:18 AM, joebeelart said:

Non-prepared campsite camping, for more than one night, several times a season is probably the best way for Our Barefoot Friends to notice "you" and possibly come around.

 

The almost universal problem with camping is that people crawl inside their "cocoons" or tents.  Then they can's see you, and you certainly can not see them.  Sleeping on a cot with mosquito netting, spray, etc. will open up a whole new world for most campers.. 

Joe, sleeping on a cot with netting would open up new experiences. Is this a test? I am in bear and cougar country. A cougar passed by me  while I was snowshoeing.  The cat had other plans.  In Washington State, Grizzly bear area is further south than what fin & feather will tell you. I would  not use a cot and netting. I am tough and chewy on the outside, pink and crunchy on the inside. Getting to me on a cot would be easier than opening up a tootsie roll. I'll pass on the cot approach.and let others do that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
joebeelart
BFF Donor

I do not want anyone to "test" my ideas. 

 

In my book, The Oregon Bigfoot Highway, I explicitly address your concerns through experience.  You are exactly correct, cougars will come within feet of a sleeping man.  The cougar events are listed in the index, reader's have to go back to the reference stories.  Once one was four feet from my cot when it left a "cord."  This was on-site investigated by both Steve Kiley and Cliff Olson.  Once "the snow sweeper" walked exactly by the left side of my truck bed where I was sleeping; and then, sat on a rock no more than six feet from the tailgate of my truck to watch me sleep, sweeping snow with it's tail.  In another instance one walked by the tailgate of my truck no more than 10 total feet from my head in the high Clackamas.  In that instance, it was setting up an ambush for squirrels at dawn.  And, there are four more cougar episodes established by campers with me or photographs. 

 

One of the most disturbing; that is not in my book due to the photographer's wishes, is a cougar that walked into his, and two other men's campground on the SW side of Mt. Hood.  He took a photo of the cougar standing between two of the men on camp chairs next to a fire.  The cat carefully looked around, strode to the fire, warmed up, looked around, and finally walked out of their camp.  After consulting with a ODFW biologist, it was decided that particular cat was probably illegally raised by humans, was released into the wild and then made it's entrance.  Since it was deemed a serious hazard, that cougar was dog hunted and eliminated.

 

So, yes, there are hazards.  However, if one of Our Bigfoot Friends come around and you are in your cocoon, how will you know.  Also, don't forget bears.  Bears love leftovers and will raise hell within feet of sleeping humans, in tent or out.  One warning:  If a wild critter goes after your tent, do you have a "cut and escape" knife?  Finally, don't count the tails of the PCT people.  The animals along the trail know humans and how they act.

 

 

 

a Wet Trip 9 10 texted copy.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Catmandoo
BFF Donor

My tent has 2 entrances/exits. My snoring will scare them away (cartoon snoring). 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bipedalist
BFF Patron

I had a class B where a clown BF was imitating my snoring.  If anything it brings them closer, doesn't scare them away. 

 

I am not a fan of being a wrapped burrito in a hammock.  Sleeping under the stars may be cool in the rest of the country but not so much in the Great Smokies. 

 

You are bait for insects and can only soak up so much run-off until hypothermia sets in.   Sure the bug netting would be cool but i feel I am better at negotiating tent zippering than a gamut of netting.

 

I am remembering a Wind River Range WY trip where if you slept under the stars with netting you would have been deafened without ear plugs due to the intensity of insect closeness.

 

Of course if you can run to the truck to sleep and dodge these inconveniences all bets are off, lol!

Edited by bipedalist

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
wiiawiwb
BFF Donor

When out backpacking, I use a Six Moon Designs Lunar Duo which provides netting around me yet allows an unimpaired view on both sides. On either end, the view is severely limited so I have to hope it approaches me from the side. Where I live, netting is required during bug season as you'd be eaten alive without it. Cowboy camping can occur in pre and post bug season although I prefer a netted tent. One less setup to have to deal with.

 

I never liked the idea of being in a hammock. If it rains, you have no where to go; you're stuck inside the hotdog. In a tent you can at least move around easily.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u_sNSYnyqVs

 

There are a few research areas I have gone that are accessible with a 4x4 in which case I bring my Cabela's Alaskan Guide tent. The good news is it has ample door and window netting to see anything coming your way in all directions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SWWASAS

I like to think outside the box and was thinking about camping as a tactic to use in BF research.     I have to admit as a solo researcher that I have only used camping to position myself into areas that I can investigate during day outings.    I doubt that I would solo camp in an active area even if I had one now.  I suppose that is because I have experienced the mean side of BF and don't like the idea of doing that alone in the dark.       But thinking about mine and apparently others reported camping protocols leaves a lot of questions in my mind about what we are doing.      Most camper researchers, scout the area in the daytime looking for prints and hope to have an encounter.       I get that, in that daytime is the best time to find prints.      Evening falls we head to camp,  eat, talk,  and many participate in adult beverages.   When the collective effect of all that in a long day we put out fires (if they are even allowed) and go to bed.       If anyone does something different than that I would like to hear it.     Anyway as accounts go,  curious BF enter camp at near 2 AM to explore while the naked apes sleep.    Someone might hear something but admit they are reluctant to get up open their tent or camper and face whatever is prowling around.     Then in the morning people admit hearing things,  there may be signs it was BF, but no one sees anything.   And in spite of a close encounter we learn nothing.     This is the reason Joe likes to sleep with a view but he admits to sleeping through stuff.      

 

    I don't want to step on toes but no wonder that we never make progress.         If you are scouting an insurgent enemy, in their territory,   you would not go to bed without a sentry.    That is exactly what we seem to do with BF.      Someone sitting out all night might discourage a BF camp visit, but someone sure could be out of sight in a tent monitoring hidden cameras and other sensors.      I live in the country.     My mailbox lid 140 feet from the house,   has a sensor that tells me when it is opened and could similarly tell me if a cooler lid was opened.   It is battery operated and the batteries last about a year.    I have a sensor that detects something as small as a rabbit coming up my driveway nearly 120 feet away.      Another talking to the same device alerts me that something is moving around my outbuildings.     I have cameras that monitor inside my house when I am away.      They alert me via email that they saw someone in my dark house.    I get wide angle HD video.   It normally is me coming home before I unplug it but at least I know it is working.        We are in the age of cheap gadgets and cheap hidden cameras.      Why are we not using them?   Like my house,  nothing should be able to enter camp without being detected or photographed.    Ok a 4 hour watch is not fun, but if the night watches are rotated,  the camp could be monitored during night hours.    This would not work for solo researchers unless you become a night creature too.     I suspect that BF would simply wait until you were asleep in the daytime then come to explore.  Even without a sentry, sensors and cameras could still be deployed to cover a camp at night.      While a game camera on a tree sticks out like a sore thumb in the woods,  humans have enough gadgets sitting around a camp that hidden sensors and cameras would simply be lost in the clutter of other human stuff.     

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
wiiawiwb
BFF Donor

When out alone, there are only so many hours in a day.  When you have to retire for sleep, there is no one else. Moreover I am a terrible sleeper and would have no chance of shut eye during the day.  The areas I go are few but they have a history of sightings so I will keep going back to them. That means I know the area and that helps to save time.

 

When night falls, I head out further into the woods and will just sit, observe, and listen. 

 

I never partake in adult beverages as I always carry and the two definitely don't mix.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Explorer
BFF Donor

^ I agree, SWWASAS.

 

One of the biggest failures of the camping strategy of BF research is going to sleep at night.

 

I know it is difficult to do, but folks should stay in their tents fully awake/alert from midnight until 3 AM without lights on and with video/thermals on standby.

 

I am guilty of falling asleep with this strategy, especially when nothing is going on. But, you never know when something will happen.  I only use this strategy in known hot spots.

 

Key to success is to avoid long exhaustive hikes during the day and preserve the energy for the evening.  Drinking a few cups of coffee at night also helps.  It also helps to have somebody else camping with you; it reduces boredom and helps filter signal from noise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Catmandoo
BFF Donor

^^ I try to camp in areas with 'white noise', like a brook. When the sound of the white noise stops (blocked), you have a visitor(s).  I have had a herd of deer completely block the quiet noise from a brook. I woke up instantly. Other bio indicators to think about are crickets, frogs and deciduous leaves. Crunching of dry leaves is very loud in the quiet night air. A bounding small animal ( bunny ) will create loud crunching noises. Crunching noises are not conclusive, but you should wake up. 

If you drink a lot of coffee to stay awake, you might want to consider a 'horizontal carafe'.

horizontal carafe.jpg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Huntster
BFF Donor

I once had a large black bear boar trot right up to me, no more than 5’ away, as I lay on tje ground against a log next to a 3’ tall campfire in a very remote location. When I jumped up and towards my rifle upon realizing he wasn’t my dog, I scared the Hell out of him. He skeddadled, but hung around out of sight for hours. I had to leave.

 

Another time, on a slow exit by riverboat from the upper Huslia River, we set up our wall tent as it began to snow. As I laid on my cot, my head was right next to the corner of the tent. As I drifted off to sleep I thought I heard something sniffing the corner of the tent. I figured it was the sound of the falling snow. The next morning there were wolf tracks in the snow at that corner of the tent. His nose was about 2’ from my head.

  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
gigantor
BFF Donor

Alright, who let the Huntster out of the cage?!  :D

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Huntster
BFF Donor
14 hours ago, gigantor said:

Alright, who let the Huntster out of the cage?!  :D

 

An old sasquatch female named Patty snuck up and unlatched the door to my cage. :)

  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BobbyO
SSR Team

I hope you’ve voted Me Hunster ? ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...