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Caenus

This is my gear...what am I missing and what is pointless?

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gigantor
10 hours ago, Caenus said:

What situation am I not prepared for?

 

The most important one IMO. When you don't have any of the bulky cameras on hand and you have a sighting.  You need one of these:
 

Gogloo E7

 

goglooE7.PNG

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Caenus
26 minutes ago, gigantor said:

 

The most important one IMO. When you don't have any of the bulky cameras on hand and you have a sighting.  You need one of these:
 

Gogloo E7

 

goglooE7.PNG

 

I’ve actually tried two different models of those. Both crapped out after one or two trips.  I really like the concept but I don’t like the cheap lenses. I use the little cube cams now.  I’ll clip one to my hat, front and back.  They work well enough.  

 

http://a.co/d/6twWc2Y

 

 

 

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gigantor

Cool. I got a pair of those a few months ago and tried them at the beach, works good. They will accept prescription lenses. I did not try them for an extended period of time though...

 

The problem with the little cubes, I have one, is you don't know what you're aiming at.

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norseman
BFF Donor
10 hours ago, Caenus said:

Thank you sir!

 

Still need someone to watch my 6 (or watch theirs) if you are ever near AZ and want to see one,give me a shout!

 

I too have ringing in the ears from my neck being pinched. Hopefully when they cut on me this will be another side affect that goes away.

 

I will definitely look you up the next time Im in AZ!

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wiiawiwb

Super-organized setup. Kudos. I like how you have things arranged in cases. A place for everything and everything in its place. I can take a lesson from that.

 

The only things I can see are:

 

1) Wind muff for your mic:

 

http://www.windtech.tv/Mic-Muff.php

 

2) Multiple fire starting equipment (Bic lighter, ferrocerium rod, magnesium rod, tinder)

 

https://firesteel.com/

 

3) A parabolic microphone - I haven't found one yet and am still searching for one myself

 

http://dimensionzone.com/paranormal/the_technology_parabolic_microphones.htm

 

 

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Caenus

I have not tried a parabolic microphone yet. Never even used one. I’ve researched them a little but haven’t pulled the trigger. 

 

For fire starting. That is well covered in my camp gear.

 

In my maxpedition bag I keep one of those little 2x2 ziplock with a few Vaseline covered cotton balls, a fire steel/whistle combo...

 

I wear a paracord bracelet with a fire steel in the buckle...

 

I also have bic lighters in just about every bag, box and pocket...

 

My daughters love Vienna sausages so I save the cans and make mini “campfires in a can” and bring one of those for every day I plan to be out...

 

I also have a single burner propane stove in the cooking gear...and in my bugout bag, that stays in the vehicle, I have an MSR “pocket rocket” stove that works really well as a mini blow torch to light damp tinder....

I

have a folding magnifying glass I keep in my pocket that I could use and a butane long neck lighter in the cooking box...

 

compass with a magnifying glass built in...

 

There is a zippo in my first aid box for sterilizing tweezers, etc, and a full bottle of isopropyl alcohol...

 

I could use use the terminals on the solar battery to start a fire...

 

I could pop pop open a cartridge and fire the empty casing (just the primer) into the powder pile...

 

Bugout bag bag also has a waterproof match tube with matches and more Vaseline cotton balls. 

 

Maybe be this weekend I’ll do a video of my camp setup, etc. might be fun and give me something to do. I planned on showing my daughters how to start a fire with firesteel anyway. 

 

When out out with the family I camp like an African expedition...lol.  

 

Flashlights are my “thing”.  Since Iraq I’ve been a bit OCD about flashlights and lighting since that was the day of mag lights and bulbs constantly burning out...lol

 

Every family camping trip I bring:

 

On body:

5.11 80 lumen penlight (my everyday carry...almost always in my pocket even around civilization)

200 lumen wide angle headlamp

 

Bugout bag:

80 lumen white/green/red led flashlight

 

In camp:

3, 500 lumen C cell aluminum tactical led flashlights w/strobe (about 10” long and reasonably heavy)

Streamlight Siege lantern (hi/Med/low/red)

Secondary Ozark Trail LED lantern (hi/Med/low/sos strobe)

both girls have their own LED flashlights (40 lumens)

led light for the inside of the tent

weapon light/laser for the glock

1000 lumen taclight mounted on the AR

...of course the floodlight kit

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SWWASAS

I have a thought that will probably drive you crazy.    While I lug around gear with similar photographic interests,  I have found that more interactions happen with BF when the gear I have is not evident.   My logic is that either human tech gear is so alien, strange and scary to BF that just the sight of it makes BF leary.     Or that they understand what cameras do and avoid it for that reason.    I firmly believe that if we present ourself closer to their level without gadgets evident, we are more likely to have them get close enough to get a look at them.     If your camp looks like some ad in Cabellas,   I don't think they will come anywhere near it.  Your organized storage containers certainly are impressive.       

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Caenus
3 hours ago, SWWASAS said:

I have a thought that will probably drive you crazy.    While I lug around gear with similar photographic interests,  I have found that more interactions happen with BF when the gear I have is not evident.   My logic is that either human tech gear is so alien, strange and scary to BF that just the sight of it makes BF leary.     Or that they understand what cameras do and avoid it for that reason.    I firmly believe that if we present ourself closer to their level without gadgets evident, we are more likely to have them get close enough to get a look at them.     If your camp looks like some ad in Cabellas,   I don't think they will come anywhere near it.  Your organized storage containers certainly are impressive.       

 

You should see some of the camping folk up here. They bring in 4 or 5 pickups with their landscaping trailers loaded with 2-3 coolers each, full bbq grills, lawn furniture, at least two pop up shades each...they set up a city block! It is incredible. 

 

I completely understand what you mean though.  The back gate of the commander lifts up, I set the camera and surveillance boxes in the back and use them as a desk. The Commander is my “Command Center” (pun intended).  The only thing out in the camp is the camp kitchen (a fancy table essentially), the cooler, tent and some camp chairs around the fire. 

 

My long guns are set up in their cases in the command center, so they are not visible to anyone or anything.  My Maxpedition bag is my day bag/walking around bag. It has a large compartment which will hold the dslr with the 300mm lens attached...so it is out of sight.  It has a water bottle compartment, a spot for the video camera...but honestly I usually have that out.  It also has a purpose built compartment for a pistol. Google “maxpedition jumbo concealed weapon draw”.  It is almost as fast as from a holster...so I can carry the pistol without it being seen either.  All together it basically looks like a “murse”.

Sorry I am geeking out with gear lists, lol.

 

The Maxpedition is carried over one shoulder and has a belt loop to take some of the weight off.  It is around $80 but mine is 10 years old and still very little wear.  There are generic bags on eBay for around $25.  My dad bought one for traveling and it seems of similar quality.  

 

In the bag, with the items in the photos, I still have room for:

 

Snack/lunch

Extra mag for the pistol (or two, but they are 15rnds each so...)

Water filter straw

Altoids tin firestarting kit

Bandanna or shemagh (usually worn)

emergency blanket

Small DNA sample kit (mostly for hair, etc)

compass

small area map

gps

Spare camera battery and SD cards

small boo boo kit and an Israeli bandage

block of mainstay ration

 

on my back along my belt is my camp knife, carried horizontally, usually with my shirt over the top.  It is 4” drop point 440 steel. (Walther BUK)

I carry a multitool on my belt (Gerber 660)

5.11 penlight clipped in my pocket (60 or 80 lumens, I don’t remember)

Mechanix gloves in my back pocket

 

my hat has 50 ft of paracord wrapped around it with a small carabiner and I wear a paracord bracelet with a fire starter and the worlds worst compass with whistle.  If I had to, I could make a night of it if I had proper clothing.

 

I used to carry a match tube fishing kit, but I tried to catch some trout with it a few times...it sucks.  Then I tried one of those pen fishing poles...that broke.  So foraging for me if I need to.

95ADCC6A-D831-40F2-8279-489338015EB3.jpeg

350B9042-83C7-4BEC-AE93-67B5D995FF6E.jpeg

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Catmandoo
BFF Donor

"mini campfires in a can". I think I know what you mean. Please elaborate. I do something similar.

Emergency fire starter. Works when everything is soaking wet. I use large tuna fish cans. 2 feet of 2-ply cardboard wide enough to protrude above the tuna can. Cardboard is coiled up, spiral held with toothpicks, and placed in can. Melted paraffin wax is slowly added. Takes time to make them. Works great. (secondary Charlie the tuna)

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Caenus
22 minutes ago, Catmandoo said:

"mini campfires in a can". I think I know what you mean. Please elaborate. I do something similar.

Emergency fire starter. Works when everything is soaking wet. I use large tuna fish cans. 2 feet of 2-ply cardboard wide enough to protrude above the tuna can. Cardboard is coiled up, spiral held with toothpicks, and placed in can. Melted paraffin wax is slowly added. Takes time to make them. Works great. (secondary Charlie the tuna)

 

Exactly.  I use the Vienna sausage cans.  We don’t generally have too many chicken of the sea cans laying around.  Sounds like they would work better by having a wider diameter flame?

 

I use old candles, so when I break them apart to melt them, I’ll jam an inch or two of the wick into the side or center for an easy start.

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Catmandoo
BFF Donor

The tuna can is 4" of flame on. Takes a couple pours to compensate for shrinkage during cooling.

 

Essential items: everyone should have a signal mirror and whistle, on a lanyard, hanging around neck. The whistle is an 'Acme Thunderer 660', made for young lungs, old lungs. ( no jokes about acme dynamite kits please, meep meep). You will sound like a World Cup Ref throwing a flag. The red and silver background is the classic all weather blanket, original space brand blanket. This one is 5' X 7'.

IMG_0013.JPG

IMG_3113.JPG

 

 

 

Israeli bandage is 'Israeli tourniquet'?.

I forgot a tin of Bag Balm,  the universal cure.

Edited by Catmandoo
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Catmandoo
BFF Donor

Does the Israeli bandage that you carry have blood clotting granules?  We are top heavy and can easily end up with a chest puncture type wound. A chest puncture dressing with blood clotting granules is good to have. Many older researchers are taking blood thinning medicine. 

I have items purchased over the internet and don't know what is good or junk. Any input from your supervisor on blood clotting products?

Not getting sick is important for field activities. Run this by your supervisor:  " Dr Catmandoo says to drink Everclear and you will not get sick because no pathogen on this planet will recognize your body as a host".

Consumption of Everclear is for medicinal purposes only. ( fire starter? )

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Caenus
2 hours ago, Catmandoo said:

Does the Israeli bandage that you carry have blood clotting granules?  We are top heavy and can easily end up with a chest puncture type wound. A chest puncture dressing with blood clotting granules is good to have. Many older researchers are taking blood thinning medicine. 

I have items purchased over the internet and don't know what is good or junk. Any input from your supervisor on blood clotting products?

Not getting sick is important for field activities. Run this by your supervisor:  " Dr Catmandoo says to drink Everclear and you will not get sick because no pathogen on this planet will recognize your body as a host".

Consumption of Everclear is for medicinal purposes only. ( fire starter? )

 

Israeli bandage does not have quikclot or similar infused.  I have a packet of quikclot granules, but in order to use it, every other method to stop severe arterial bleeding would have had to fail.  The Israeli bandage is pretty versatile as it is.  

 

I am not a Dr, so first off, I would suggest you speak to your doctor and explain that you are doing backcountry excursions and may not have help for quite some time...they will give you some recommendations of what supplies to bring with your current ability level.  I also suggest a first aid class and a CERT course is VERY useful.  

 

Now, my training and experience tells me YOU DO NOT want to apply quikclot to a chest puncture wound, if by that you mean a “sucking chest wound” which is a puncture that punctures a lung that does not allow you to get the proper suction necessary to draw fresh air into your lungs.  The clotting granules cause a lot of damage.  That may cause too much damage for a surgeon to repair.  I have seen arterial bleeds that quikclot was used on (femoral).  It did save the soldiers life, but they had to remove a ton of damaged tissue, graft in new tissue, etc.  If you ever have a non gushing wound, use quikclot as your last resort.  If I get a severed limb, tourniquet first.   If I am able to get to an ER in the next 4-5 hours, I’ll go so far as a tourniquet for a sever arterial bleed.  Direct pressure is preferred while your body does it’s thing and swells, clots etc to stem the blood flow.  Being on blood thinners is pretty scary as a bruise or knock to the head can be enough to cause internal hemorrhaging.

 

To use the Israeli bandage for a sucking chest wound, you’d remove the bandage, turn the packaging inside out, place it against the wound to create a seal, then wrap the bandage around tightly, tying a knot over the wound.  

 

I tried the “raise your blood alcohol level to the point a pathogen cannot live” strategy...I got sick...alcohol suppresses the immune system...plus the possibility of permanent damage or alcohol poisoning...and alcohol increases bleeding as well.  With a blood thinner, I would not drink alcohol...ever.

 

If you are very concerned about torso damage, get an armored motorcycle jacket to wear under your jacket. They are $40 or so on eBay.  I keep one in my vehicle as well as a bump helmet in case things get out of hand.  It will help protect against large rocks, etc.

 

 

 

 

image.jpg

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Belpherion

A respectable set-up.  Props to you.  I'll give you a couple of upgrade suggestions for future purchases.  Trade up from the D3200 to a D7200.  The 3000 and 5000 series are entry level DSLR cameras and cannot survive any kind of weather or dust. The D7200 has weather sealing and can handle moderate rain and dust if you also attach a weather sealed lens.  The 35mm 1.8 DX lens is fairly capable lens and has the dust/moisture seal, fairly wide aperture for lower light use, and it is affordable.  A Tamron 18-300 is a nice daytime walk-around lens, but not as good in low light.  The D500 is what I use, but it isn't cheap.  I use a D7200 as a backup body and it has served quite well.  It's an intermediate camera but it is affordable, especially if you find a good used one at Adorama or B&H.  One huge benefit to the D7200 is dual card slots.  Pop a couple of 32 gig (Lexar platinum II UH1 or Sandisk Ultra Class 10 UHS1) cards and you can set up to send photos to one slot and video to the other slot or run 1 slot as primary and the other as a duplicate so you have a backup.  SD cards go bad after about 1000 formats, so having a backup can save your bacon.  I've been a wildlife photographer for 30 years.  Find Moose Peterson on YouTube.  He has some great tips on setups.  I mostly shoot in Aperture Priority, set my ISO fairly high to keep the shutter speed up over 1/200 of a second.  I highly recommend a battery grip as well.  Once you use one, you will never shoot a DSLR without one.  

   

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