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BobbyO

Winter's coming !

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BobbyO
SSR Team

Always had a thing about Winter and Sasquatch, no specific reason, other than i guess it's a good time to potentially get some decent evidence.

 

Here's some numbers anyway.

 

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Published by Bobby Obf
Like This Page · 18 June · 
 
 
#Sasquatch #MonsterXRadio

We are aware via the numbers that Sasquatch reports submitted by home owners from their own property increase during the winter months, more so in the colder states.

We see big jumps from the Olympic Peninsula (43%) in WA State compared to overall State wide numbers (29%).

Listen to more on this subject (these specific reports heard aren’t listed in the database for the record) right here - http://www.blogtalkradio.com/monsterxradio/2018/06/17/monster-x-radio-with-donna
 
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 #Sasquatch 

In recent years (the last 7 anyway), the WA State Geographical Zone of the Olympic Peninsula is seeing over 2 Reports, on average, each year.

Most interesting is when these Reports occur.

52% of All Reports come from Winter.
6% of All Reports from Spring
19% of All Reports from Summer
19% of All Reports from Fall

There is NO habitat in North America that see's a larger % of Reports from Winter than the Olympic Peninsula, and with a large % of those (67%) being Actual Visual Sightings, could the Olympic Peninsula be viewed as a kind of "Winter Haven" for our target species, or do you think that they're there year round yet are just maybe a little more mobile in these months than elsewhere in the State ?

For comparison in the same time frame.

North Cascades :

10% of All Reports come from Winter.
30% of All Reports from Spring
30% of All Reports from Summer
30% of All Reports from Fall

South Cascades :

14% of All Reports come from Winter.
33% of All Reports from Spring
28% of All Reports from Summer
25% of All Reports from Fall

Photo Credit : Exotic Hikes
 
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Published by Bobby Obf
Like This Page · 1 February · 
 
#Sasquatch

Here's a little look at numbers, and specifically Winter numbers, from IL, IN MI and WI.

It should be noted that each of the four States makes up the following % of the 594 Total Reports we have in the Database :

IL - 39% of Total Reports, from 4.4m Forested Acres
IN - 12% of Total Reports, from 4.6m Forested Acres
MI - 35% of Total Reports, from 19.3m Forested Acres
WI - 13% of Total Reports, from 16m Forested Acres

Illinois leads the way with number of Reports (232), has the least amount of Forested Acres, but the highest population of people.

Actual Visual Reports in Winter / Spring / Summer / Fall / Average Reports 

IL - 57% / 42% / 34% / 40% / 42%
IN - 14% / 11% / 15% / 11% / 13%
MI - 18% / 38% / 37% / 36% / 32%
WI - 11% / 13% / 14% / 13% / 13%

Winter see's a real dip in numbers in Michigan (-53% and -50% decrease on Spring and Fall respectively), with a significant rise at the same time of year in Illinois (36% and 43% increase on Spring and Fall respectively). 

Both Indiana and Wisconsin remain pretty consistent throughout the year.
 
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#Sasquatch - Reports from Witnesses "Normal activity at Home" is at a whopping 26% of all Winter Reports (30/114) in the Pacific Northwest State's of WA, OR, ID and BC.

Compare that to :

Spring 9% (16/178, Winter see's a 189% increase)
Summer 11% (47/417, Winter see's a 136% increase)
Fall 12% (32/265, Winter see's a 117% increase)

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NathanFooter
57 minutes ago, BobbyO said:

Always had a thing about Winter and Sasquatch, no specific reason, other than i guess it's a good time to potentially get some decent evidence.

 

Here's some numbers anyway.

 

--

 

Published by Bobby Obf
Like This Page · 18 June · 
 
 
#Sasquatch #MonsterXRadio

We are aware via the numbers that Sasquatch reports submitted by home owners from their own property increase during the winter months, more so in the colder states.

We see big jumps from the Olympic Peninsula (43%) in WA State compared to overall State wide numbers (29%).

Listen to more on this subject (these specific reports heard aren’t listed in the database for the record) right here - http://www.blogtalkradio.com/monsterxradio/2018/06/17/monster-x-radio-with-donna
 
--
 
 
 
 #Sasquatch 

In recent years (the last 7 anyway), the WA State Geographical Zone of the Olympic Peninsula is seeing over 2 Reports, on average, each year.

Most interesting is when these Reports occur.

52% of All Reports come from Winter.
6% of All Reports from Spring
19% of All Reports from Summer
19% of All Reports from Fall

There is NO habitat in North America that see's a larger % of Reports from Winter than the Olympic Peninsula, and with a large % of those (67%) being Actual Visual Sightings, could the Olympic Peninsula be viewed as a kind of "Winter Haven" for our target species, or do you think that they're there year round yet are just maybe a little more mobile in these months than elsewhere in the State ?

For comparison in the same time frame.

North Cascades :

10% of All Reports come from Winter.
30% of All Reports from Spring
30% of All Reports from Summer
30% of All Reports from Fall

South Cascades :

14% of All Reports come from Winter.
33% of All Reports from Spring
28% of All Reports from Summer
25% of All Reports from Fall

Photo Credit : Exotic Hikes
 
--
 
Published by Bobby Obf
Like This Page · 1 February · 
 
#Sasquatch

Here's a little look at numbers, and specifically Winter numbers, from IL, IN MI and WI.

It should be noted that each of the four States makes up the following % of the 594 Total Reports we have in the Database :

IL - 39% of Total Reports, from 4.4m Forested Acres
IN - 12% of Total Reports, from 4.6m Forested Acres
MI - 35% of Total Reports, from 19.3m Forested Acres
WI - 13% of Total Reports, from 16m Forested Acres

Illinois leads the way with number of Reports (232), has the least amount of Forested Acres, but the highest population of people.

Actual Visual Reports in Winter / Spring / Summer / Fall / Average Reports 

IL - 57% / 42% / 34% / 40% / 42%
IN - 14% / 11% / 15% / 11% / 13%
MI - 18% / 38% / 37% / 36% / 32%
WI - 11% / 13% / 14% / 13% / 13%

Winter see's a real dip in numbers in Michigan (-53% and -50% decrease on Spring and Fall respectively), with a significant rise at the same time of year in Illinois (36% and 43% increase on Spring and Fall respectively). 

Both Indiana and Wisconsin remain pretty consistent throughout the year.
 
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#Sasquatch - Reports from Witnesses "Normal activity at Home" is at a whopping 26% of all Winter Reports (30/114) in the Pacific Northwest State's of WA, OR, ID and BC.

Compare that to :

Spring 9% (16/178, Winter see's a 189% increase)
Summer 11% (47/417, Winter see's a 136% increase)
Fall 12% (32/265, Winter see's a 117% increase)

 

 I have been talking about this for a long time, the WA cascades report data that I have collected indicates they move down between 2500 and 500 feet elevation in the colder months ( most cases between 1500 and 2000 ).    

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MindSquatch

Something I had to asked myself about why would certain Bigfoot's choose to stay on the much colder eastern side of the Sierra's in winter rather than the warmer west side. But the same thing could be said why other wildlife such as Mule Deer and Mountain Lions stay on the east side instead of the warmer west side. The Bigfoot I saw on a very cold December early evening up on a mountain peak as it looked out over the valley below, didn't seem even to be bothered by the cold on the Eastside of the Sierra's. The elevation of the peak is about 8100 feet with the valley being about 7000 feet. The bigfoot's in this area will experience more isolation and less threat from humans than summer. But the main thing I believe that they stay on the east side is that it is their area and has been for who knows how long. They do come down from the Sierra Crest about right now due to the heavy snow up there. Anywhere you go on the east side is going to be cold through the winter with the lowest elevation being around 4700 feet. The area they winter in is in a rain shadow where the moisture is less and doesn't receive as much snow as the crest. Seems like the Cascade Range would have a similar situation with Bigfoot's wintering on the east side instead of the warmer west side. But yes, the winter time to me is an exciting time for finding evidence. Here's a photo from the top of the peak just feet away from where the Bigfoot was standing looking down to the valley below. I went up there about 10 days later. In the photo, the Bigfoot was standing on the rock in the middle looking out towards the valley below.

Dad's pictures 082.jpg

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NatFoot
BFF Donor

Standing as in just standing out in the open not a care in the world? I'm sure that caused you to do a double take!!

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MIB
BFF Donor
14 hours ago, NathanFooter said:

 I have been talking about this for a long time, the WA cascades report data that I have collected indicates they move down between 2500 and 500 feet elevation in the colder months ( most cases between 1500 and 2000 ).    

 

What's your sense of what they do, east slope of the cascades vs west slope?  

 

There's an area I've been watching with curiosity which as a lot of winter vocalization reports.    Bottom of the valley .. river level .. is 4300 feet.   Big, fairly open valley, fields on the bottom with timber around it.   Deer wintering area.   So food and cover.  

 

The only way to get lower is to move west of the cascades.   Given the number of reports from winter, that's not what is happening.  

 

I've been trying to extrapolate from what the BFs do on the east slope of the Rockies in winter.  They're sure not going clear to the gulf coast so they have some strategy for dealing with the winter cold in the interior of the continent.   Could be I can gain some insight from what you've observed in the Washington cascades.

 

MIB

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BobbyO
SSR Team
14 hours ago, NathanFooter said:

 

 I have been talking about this for a long time, the WA cascades report data that I have collected indicates they move down between 2500 and 500 feet elevation in the colder months ( most cases between 1500 and 2000 ).    

 

I'll have a look what we have with regards to winter report elevations in all parts of the WA Cascades, and the OR portion aswell, when the SSR is back up and running. Can split, combine and compare at will too.. ;)

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MindSquatch

Wouldn't think that west or east side of the Rockies would matter either way due to being so far inland from the coast. Being that the Cascade and Sierra Mountains are close to the ocean, the west side is naturally warmer than the east.

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NathanFooter
1 hour ago, MIB said:

 

What's your sense of what they do, east slope of the cascades vs west slope?  

 

There's an area I've been watching with curiosity which as a lot of winter vocalization reports.    Bottom of the valley .. river level .. is 4300 feet.   Big, fairly open valley, fields on the bottom with timber around it.   Deer wintering area.   So food and cover.  

 

The only way to get lower is to move west of the cascades.   Given the number of reports from winter, that's not what is happening.  

 

I've been trying to extrapolate from what the BFs do on the east slope of the Rockies in winter.  They're sure not going clear to the gulf coast so they have some strategy for dealing with the winter cold in the interior of the continent.   Could be I can gain some insight from what you've observed in the Washington cascades.

 

MIB

 

 I would say that most large mammals are not universally contracted to one particular region, they can and do break the rules.   I do think that a few groups are on the eastern side as I do get a trickle of reports from the edges of towns and cities such as Twisp, Wenatchee and Ellensburg in the colder months.    Paul Graves has been focused on the eastern areas for years and likely would have more input. 

 

 I will note that I don't study the eastern side of the cascades, I focus on the areas that show concentrations of report density from Skagit to Skamania county. 

 

  If you would feel comfortable sharing some data points from you suspected area I could give you comparison and thoughts. 

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hiflier
BFF Donor

One of the things maybe to consider is what a member suggested a couple of years back. That being that hunting game away from where one resides can help with game animals hanging around closer to where one lives. If Sasquatch foray to the western slopes then, when the weather gets really bad, there will be more unwary game closer to areas where Sasquatch actually live because they have not been disturbed. So, live on the East side and hunt on the West side. When the seasons are good and when winter weather and the cold temperatures set then hunt closer to home on the East side.

 

Assuming of course that Sasquatch is smart enough to have figured that out?   

Edited by hiflier

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BobbyO
SSR Team
3 hours ago, NathanFooter said:

 

 I would say that most large mammals are not universally contracted to one particular region, they can and do break the rules.   I do think that a few groups are on the eastern side as I do get a trickle of reports from the edges of towns and cities such as Twisp, Wenatchee and Ellensburg in the colder months.    Paul Graves has been focused on the eastern areas for years and likely would have more input. 

 

Speaking of which, this is last years write up - http://www.sasquatchcanada.com/uploads/9/4/5/1/945132/graves_paper_for_web.pdf 

 

With further regards to Eastern v Western Cascades slopes in Winter, check out these maps below..

 

https://squatchermetrics.carto.com/viz/8c835d5c-dc0d-11e6-b4d2-0e8c56e2ffdb/public_map 

 

https://squatchermetrics.carto.com/viz/19e57cfc-dcb8-11e6-a5bd-0e3a376473ab/public_map 

 

 

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