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Madison5716

Searching For Bigfoot in Oregon - Take 2

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Madison5716

What insightful comments you all have made. I have to go back I and read them a few times.

 

For myself, I waffle back and forth with wanting to prove their existence or to have proof for myself of their existence. i think that question is too large for my life at the end of the day, and I should simply be grateful for the experience of knowing that they exist, and even now, before seeing one, become more active in preserving their homes. Perhaps I should spend as much effort in protecting them as in trying to understand them and experience them. It's more logical to prove the existence of something and then to protect it, but perhaps it's less efficient and less helpful to the actual species to do so. 

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hiflier
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Well said. Well said indeed.

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Huntster
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On 4/21/2019 at 11:20 PM, Madison5716 said:

...........Yes, the storm this winter broke the forest essentially. In town we got 18 inches but they got 2-4 feet up there, just 1000-2000 feet higher. It was a very destructive storm. The woods are a mess everywhere.  It's quite amazing.  

 

We tried walking straight up the mountain, but it took us 5 minutes to go about 10 feet - you have no idea where the ground is because of branches, logs and ferns. 

20190420_115304.jpg

 

 

The part of that storm that was all over the news was the stranded train, but maybe I missed it; were there widespread high winds associated with it, too?

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NorthWind

Not so much, really. The damage was primarily caused by a sudden snowload rather than high winds. The snow was the really wet, heavy kind. There's so much damage. It is going to make squatching very difficult for quite some time. The photos Madison posted are pretty typical of most of the way the forests look right now, at least here in mid Oregon.

 

 

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SWWASAS
10 hours ago, Madison5716 said:

What insightful comments you all have made. I have to go back I and read them a few times.

 

For myself, I waffle back and forth with wanting to prove their existence or to have proof for myself of their existence. i think that question is too large for my life at the end of the day, and I should simply be grateful for the experience of knowing that they exist, and even now, before seeing one, become more active in preserving their homes. Perhaps I should spend as much effort in protecting them as in trying to understand them and experience them. It's more logical to prove the existence of something and then to protect it, but perhaps it's less efficient and less helpful to the actual species to do so. 

I think the best you can hope for is a sighting.     That of course only proves to you that they exist.  Proving existence takes a body or skeleton delivered to the right people.  

 

My Washington State House member proposed a bill recognizing bigfoot.   I wrote a suggested statement for her encouraging the legislature to provide some protection until the species is recognized by science.  Nothing was done with it.    That sort of thing can be done by any of us if you want to protect the species.   Too many of us sit on what we know or have seen for fear of ridicule.   

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Madison5716

The train (and small outlying town) were stranded because all the roads and highways looked just like that forest picture - thousands of trees down across them and the power lines.

 

My kids best friend lives in one of those little towns and it took 21 days before they had electricity restored. 

Edited by Madison5716

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Huntster
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5 hours ago, Madison5716 said:

.......My kids best friend lives in one of those little towns and it took 21 days before they had electricity restored. 

 

9 hours ago, NorthWind said:

.........The damage was primarily caused by a sudden snowload rather than high winds. The snow was the really wet, heavy kind.......

 

That’s incredible. There are some BIG trees down there. I’ve seen ice storms do that with smaller trees here. The ice loads up on the trees, but it can’t fall off like snow.

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Madison5716

I have a friend who works with the forest service and she says that they estimate they can clear only 40% of the Forest roads by the end of summer. She says they are scared to death of the Forest fire seasons in the next few years with all the downed wood and brush. They won't be able to get near large portions of the Forest with fire fighting gear. Yikes! Better enjoy it this summer, looks like.

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BigTreeWalker

In the Gifford Pinchot National Forest blocking roads seems to be business as usual. Hate to see if or when a fire occurs how they are going to get access to many areas. 

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SWWASAS

They will not allow logging, so they do not get timber revenue, so don't have the money to maintain roads,  so block them off because they become unsafe, so they cannot get in to fight fires, so declare fires part of nature and want to let them burn.     Mean while during fire season people like me cannot go outdoors because it is too unhealthy.     There needs to be a class action suit against the Forest Service.  

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Huntster
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If they just open areas up for subsistence wood harvest (firewood or cabin logs), and restrict it to downed timber only, they'd find that people will start with the wood on/near the road, thereby doing the bulk of the road clearing, and by doing this by area, they can rather quickly get roads cleared inexpensively. On Ft. Richardson we did this regularly. Whenever we cleared an area, we'd simply stack or push the trees up in a corner and let the public have at it. On post, it was almost universally DoD personnel because of base access limitations.........state road projects had wood disappear as if it was gold. I'd go to road project public information meetings, and the vast majority of the people there just wanted to know when they could start scarfing up the wood before everybody else got it.

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SWWASAS

One would think that.    I think you have to have permits to harvest down wood.   If something works and is efficient is seems like it is the last thing some government agency will let you do. 

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Huntster
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26 minutes ago, SWWASAS said:

..........I think you have to have permits to harvest down wood...........

 

Most definitely. The Army, of course, would issue permits, and so would the state DOT in road project areas, mostly because they wanted to educate the wood gatherers on what not to do in the area. That provides liability limits in case (or, more accurately, when) somebody does something stupid and gets hurt. Gotta' have permits for everything now in the Lower 48, even just to enter an area or camp overnight. It isn't quite that bad yet up here. One can go out even onto most national forest lands and game refuges and even national parks in Alaska with no permits and camp for up to 14 days/nights. But all wood harvesting requires a permit.

 

Out of curiosity, I looked it up on the Umpqua National Forest website:

 

https://www.fs.usda.gov/main/umpqua/passes-permits/forestproducts

 

.........



The term "Special Forest Products" applies to forest resources that are not associated with timber sale contracts. Hundreds of these products are currently used in thousands of ways, and new uses for these products are being discovered every day. Uses range from strawberries, huckleberries, and mushrooms for personal consumption to commercial uses such as decorative plant arrangements, landscaping plants, Christmas wreaths, plants with medicinal properties, and for scientific or commercial research purposes.

A large variety of products are currently being harvested on the Umpqua. Some of the more common products that we sell are Christmas trees; firewood; evergreen boughs for wreaths and other decorations; decorative greenery such as salal; mushrooms; posts, poles and rails for fencing; live transplants (conifer trees, vine maple, and others); beargrass (for decorative arrangements); prince's pine (medicinal and flavoring); and dry cones (decorative arrangements).

We occasionally sell other products such as burls, fiddle head ferns, quinine conk, burly/knobby lodgepole posts & poles for rustic furniture, and a variety of other products that can be removed in a sound, ecological manner..........

 

The firewood permit is $20, and allows up to 6 cords of wood to be harvested per year.

 

 

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BigTreeWalker

We can still do what they call dispersal camping for up to two weeks without a permit in the GPNF. 

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SWWASAS

See the firewood permit is intentionally limited to 6 cords of wood to prevent commercial firewood producers from being able to do it.  The intention is likely that it is allowed for home use.     Mean while we are told that it is the down wood that is causing the forest fires.   But rather than getting paid by commercial firewood providers to clear out the down wood,  the government would rather let contracts and pay companies to clear out the down wood.   Commercial enterprises are less likely to set the forest on fire than private individuals out using chainsaws once a year.     It makes one wonder when stuff is going to be managed by thinking adults.  

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