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Madison5716

Searching For Bigfoot in Oregon - Take 2

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Madison5716

Regarding my dog, he did flat out refuse to walk down the beach where (what I believe was) the bigfoot yelled at me. I snapped what I thought was just a pretty scene, I tried to walk down the beach, he refused, I took a picture of him and then something yelled from the forest and we hightailed it out. So, yes, I do think he would know if they were near. 

 

However, I will not put him in danger just to be an early warning system on nearby bigfoots. He's old, slow and not any sort of big outdoorsy dog. He'd vastly prefer to stay home and nap on the couch. I only take him on low or no risk adventures like camping or fishing.  In addition, he is not the sharpest crayon in the box and I don't trust him not to do stupid things in the woods, lol. I'd feel terrible if anything happened to him.  So, yes, I think he'd know if they were near, but I hope to never find that out.

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ShadowBorn

Most dogs are pretty perceptive and know full well when there is danger around. My German Shephard is a bit different when we walk down trails and these creatures might be around. He will usually walk ahead of me and take the lead but when these guys are in the area he will stick tight at my side. He will just give me this weird look and I will just know what is up with him..

 

So it is great to have a dog like yours since you can really trust him/her. The good thing is that if you are ever in great danger your dog will place it's self between you and the danger. It is amazing how dogs are with their partners. They really do have that six sense around their masters and I am not sure how they know it. But they know the person in you just like these creatures do. These creatures will test us and test our reactions once they have encountered you. 

 

If you have been camping in the same area and have been trying to make contact with these creatures . Then they will find you and it be best to just sit back and relax and let them make the move. Chances are they have been watching you for some time now and are getting a feel for the person you are. Have you posted that picture of where you were yelled at? It would be helpful in understanding why you were yelled at. 

 

There was an area where I was moaned at up in Northern Michigan. I was on a trail with a friend and we wanted to go into these pines off the trail but this long drawn out moan was moaned at us. we could feel it in our bodies and it seemed like what ever was in those pines did not want us to in there. We both had that feeling of not to go so we did not. So we booked out of there and went back home and analyzed the video of the moan. The thing is I have been back there and still I am alive. The only difference is I was not in bear country like where you live. So you have to be extra cautious. Just be carefull and be safe and remember your dog knows things that you might not know. I have learned to trust my dogs and they have always kept me safe. 

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Madison5716
Posted (edited)

Date & Time - Saturday April 20, 2019 11am - 4pm or so

Location- Oregon Cascades

Weather  - 55 degrees, overcast, slight drizzle and misting. Some light forest fog.

What Happened - NorthWind, my son and I took a hike/walk out in the Oregon Cascades up a damaged forest road covered in downed trees, and then closer in at one of the area lakes (I plan on visiting all of them eventually). We thought we might have heard rock clacking on the forest road, but we weren't sure, and I'm not sure the video caught it either.  The creek sure was pretty.  For the second walk at a Reservoir, we found barefoot prints, but they look human and they were close to an area at the lake that people frequent. I suppose its good practice  looking for prints regardless.  I'll post them but if anyone has a different opinion than human, say so please. Btw, the structure-shelter I found two weeks ago was destroyed by the flooding rains we had last week. Both structures are completely wiped out. It was a slightly drizzly day, but great for walking! So, not much bigfootery, but a lot of nice time outside. I'll count that as a win. 

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NorthWind walking into the fog.

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Taking a break.

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Edited by Madison5716
  • Upvote 1

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hiflier
Posted (edited)

You be careful. Pretty sure that canid track in the mud is wolf. Center pad looks up pretty deep into the toes so could be a large dog even though the curve at back of the center pad does have more of a wolf's profile. Dogs toes are a bit more splayed and their nails tend to be more blunt as well, not as sharp and thin as a wolf's. Sometimes it's hard to tell because of all the dog breeds that can be large but adult wolf tracks run about 4" x 4".

Edited by hiflier

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Madison5716
Posted (edited)

It WAS huge. It was also where people were. Who knows? In theory, we could have been in Indigo territory. Oregon has over 137 wolves, and the Indigo pack looks like it has/had 3 members? I would not like to run into them. 

 

https://dfw.state.or.us/Wolves/population.asp

Edited by Madison5716

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hiflier

People=dogs. Big prints or no big prints. Didn't mean to alarm you. Another thing about wolves is that because they are wild they tend to be more efficient when traveling and so their trackways are mostly straight. Domestic dogs wander more all over a small area and so leave prints everywhere in all directions. 

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Madison5716
Posted (edited)

Eh, I'm always alert aka paranoid in the woods, lol. I'm sure my bigfooting buddies think I'm a chickenshit. But I go anyway, lol! 

 

Btw, from the bottom of my palm to the end of my pinkie finger is 5 inches, so that print is 4 1/2" tall. I think there were only a few prints like that. Same as the barefoot human (?) prints nearby. 

Its difficult taking a photo of your own hand, lol.

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Edited by Madison5716

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hiflier
9 hours ago, Madison5716 said:

I'm sure my bigfooting buddies think I'm a chickenshit. But I go anyway, lol! 

 

There see? Then you're not. Fear is normal. There would be no such thing as Humans today if we didn't have that going for us. It were alertness stems from. The forest, beautiful as it is, is no place to be nonchalant. Everyone has a healthy level of chicken shit in them.

 

What I find a little odd is that I get a twinge of CS when emailing DNR's and F&W's :O But, like you, I do it anyway :) 

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ShadowBorn

Fear is good and it will keep you alive. Those human looking tracks look real flat footed. What length were they? and what width? Might be good to carry with you casting material so that you can practice casting prints even if they might be human. Casting animal tracks is even cooler since you can take the track back with you and google the track and know what that track came from. One way of learning and picking up detail and learning how to cast. This way when if you ever do find the real deal and I am not saying that you have not you will be able to cast it. So when you decide to go to these Bigfoot conventions and happen to see Dr. Meldrum or maybe even Cliff Barackman  they may look at your castings.

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Madison5716

Thanks, hiflier. I'm always a little more vigilant when I have my kid along, like yesterday. He has some disabilities, along with a lack of common sense, that I have to take into account when I do anything. Plus he VOLUNTEERED to go hiking all day with us, in the drizzle, which is unusual (he's usually glued to a screen), so heck yeah I took him along even though it was a bit scary! He carried his own pack without once complaining, he treated his belt knife and hear spray with respect, and he was even excited when we heard possible rock clacks - while out a mile on a forest road 15 miles from the nearest town of 500 people. We were a good ways out. He was probably trying to impress NorthWind, but I'll take it. It was a good day!

 

ShadowBorn, we didn't even measure them because of where they were. I do think the smaller one looks odd. Maybe I'll get some more .a casting material and go back. That place is only 40 miles from me. I need practice casting.

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SWWASAS
Posted (edited)

The print looks virtually identical to the Wolf print photo in my Animal Tracks and Sign book by Mark Elbrock     I am told that is sort of the bible for trackers.    I would recommend it because it is full of good color pictures,   addresses not only prints, but stride,  and scat .       Highflier mentioned the main differences between dog and wolf.     Pads are deeper, toes less splayed,   claws sharp and the middle claws tend to point towards each other,  all are signatory of wolf rather than dog.   Bigtext probably knows best because of his wolf Lulu.      I had one follow me for a while on a trail and I was unaware it was there until I turned around and came out on the same trail.     It followed me for about a half mile from what I saw in the tracks.   Mind you this was in Clark County and there were not supposed to be wolves in the county at the time.     I sent in a footprint picture and reported it to DNR and they admitted they had a sighting in the area about a month before my incident.    I think there are far more of them on Washington and Oregon than is known.  

 

Relative to the humanoid prints one looks elongated like some slipping was involved.    The  shorter one has a lot of arch in it.    My footprints are very flat compared to that.   I have flat feet.    Curious as to why you don't put some measuring device in your pictures.     I carry a tape measure but prefer to use dress making fabric tape measure because it has a mat finish and photographs better.   It is also much lighter than a 25 foot metal tape measure.  

Edited by SWWASAS

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Madison5716

I do have a measuring tape and I used it on some other prints we found that were much more ambiguous and possibly  bare. These were on the boat ramp where we ate lunch, therefore are likely human and I just didn't bother. However,  to play devil's advocate,  last time I was there I found that shelter and two 11 inch bare prints 200 yards down the very rocky, inhospitable beach. It's very questionable.

 

I am bored with housework today, so I may head back out and cast them for the heck of it, and the practice. 

 

If bigfoots are leaving these prints, I wonder if they have the intelligence to surmise that humans will think they are human prints so they aren't as diligent about covering up or disguising their juvenile prints. Obviously there's a lot of conjecture in that sentence! When they venture  near human places under cover of darkness,  do they forget that they might be leaving prints? Are these juveniles playing? Just things I wonder about. Its 95% likely nothing, but it occupies my mind to consider it. Bigfoot on the brain!

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Huntster
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, SWWASAS said:

The print looks virtually identical to the Wolf print photo in my Animal Tracks and Sign book by Mark Elbrock     I am told that is sort of the bible for trackers.    I would recommend it because it is full of good color pictures,   addresses not only prints, but stride,  and scat .       Highflier mentioned the main differences between dog and wolf.     Pads are deeper, toes less splayed,   claws sharp and the middle claws tend to point towards each other,  all are signatory of wolf rather than dog.........

 

My impression of the canine track in the photo is domestic dog, but I readily concede that it could be wolf, and that concession is largely based upon Madison's claim that there are 130 or so wolves in Oregon. That information surprised me. I thought that wolves were long gone there.

 

I see wolf tracks regularly here in Alaska, and some have been absolutely monstrous. A couple of years ago I came upon a scene wete a couple of wolves had murdered an otter. I saw them flee as I approached, and beheld the scene as the otter was expiring. One of the wolves in that pack had left some of the largest wolf prints in the snow that I have ever seen (I don't know if the two who I saw fleeing were him or not). 

 

Large wolf prints tend to be longer than they are wide. My impression of the prints in Madison's pics are that the are as wide as they are long. 

 

That is a weak basis for judgement, but there it is. A game cam program in the area, especially if bait can be legally used, would be a great way to attempt to confirm it (although in over 20 years of baiting bears with the use of a game cam, I've never got a wolf pic.......gotten grizzlies, black bears, foxes, moose, and even a wolverine.......no wolves).

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Edited by Huntster
Edited to add that I've never gotten a coyote on my cam, either.

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SWWASAS

Not to be critical but if you post a footprint picture on the forum without a size reference you will just generate the question as to what size it is.   With a visible tape in the picture that is not necessary.   Well for the Canadian folks you have to tell them it is inches rather than CM.      And I have found the boot or shoe reference next to the picture is more trouble that it is worth.   You have to photograph your boot with a tape reference so you can estimate the found print size.     You had to do that using your hand.    Over time, even if I measure a print, I forget the measurement unless it is in the picture in the first place.    So it is just cleaner and less trouble to put a measuring tape or stick in the picture in the first place.   

 

In nearly every case I have found a print,  it was fairly obvious that the BF tried not to leave one.     Stepping over mud or soft soil rather than in it.     One print I found on a lakeshore was 20 feet from the water.    It had come out of the water and gotten 20 feet inland before leaving the first print by walking on patches of vegetation to avoid leaving the print.    It ran out of vegetation patches and left a solitary print before using more patches to continue on its way.      I ended up with super muddy boots just getting to the print to photograph it.   I am smart and got muddy feet so I have to think BF is pretty clever to pull that off in the dark.    I cannot see anything but a juvenile BF being careless about leaving prints.   Some of the most reclusive and rarely seen creatures leave prints all over the place.    Cougar, wolverine etc.     That tells me that BF is intelligent enough that it understands tracking or it is a tracker too.    I think the latter.    I think if I found an obvious fresh trackway leading me off into forest,   I would wonder if I was being led into a trap because it is so uncharacteristic of BF to leave them in the first place.   When I was interacting with the group of them on a regular basis they had to observe me examining, photographing, and measuring prints.    If anything that would make them more careful about leaving them.   I sure did not find them very often after I had worked the area for a while.    Normal people do not pay any attention to prints for the most part.   My first print find had been ignored by several hikers and later was obliterated by the same groups on their way back down.  

 

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SWWASAS
35 minutes ago, Huntster said:

 

My impression of the canine track in the photo is domestic dog, but I readily concede that it could be wolf, and that concession is largely based upon Madison's claim that there are 130 or so wolves in Oregon. That information surprised me. I thought that wolves were long gone there.

 

I see wolf tracks regularly here in Alaska, and some have been absolutely monstrous. A couple of years ago I came upon a scene wete a couple of wolves had murdered an otter. I saw them flee as I approached, and beheld the scene as the otter was expiring. One of the wolves in that pack had left some of the largest wolf prints in the snow that I have ever seen (I don't know if the two who I saw fleeing were him or not). 

 

Large wolf prints tend to be longer than they are wide. My impression of the prints in Madison's pics are that the are as wide as they are long. 

 

That is a weak basis for judgement, but there it is. A game cam program in the area, especially if bait can be legally used, would be a great way to attempt to confirm it (although in over 20 years of baiting bears with the use of a game cam, I've never got a wolf pic.......gotten grizzlies, black bears, foxes, moose, and even a wolverine.......no wolves).

8C9430F9-A31A-481F-9BF2-0CBDDFB262BE.jpeg

FE3AB52D-45F3-4445-9D4D-D8DA8E60970B.jpeg

What muddies the water is that there are a lot of wolf hybrids running around as pets or strays.    It would likely be impossible to tell the difference between that and a full blooded wolf footprint   The neighbors have one that I would identify as full wolf if I saw it out in the woods.    It hated my dog and wanted to eat him every time we walked past.    The UPS men are terrified of it.    

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