Jump to content
Madison5716

Searching For Bigfoot in Oregon - Take 2

Recommended Posts

Madison5716

Hmmm, the wood knock might be NorthWind snapping his case shut and he was maybe 50-75 feet away from me at my truck... hmmm. I really thought it came from the opposite direction.  ???

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SWWASAS
Posted (edited)

In woods and if there are any cliffs around it is difficult to figure out where something distant at all that makes noise is located.  Quite frankly, in my opinion, wood knocks became a very unreliable indicator of BF activity,   when the Finding Bigfoot crowd popularized them in the TV series.      The legacy lives on at their Expedition camps.  There are hundreds out there that use them in the field.    I would guess there is much more likelihood a knock or howl for that matter is human than none human in most areas,   just because of the numbers involved.  The lack of them when my research area was BF active,  was evidence enough to me that howls or knocks have little correlation to BF activity.    That makes sense if you consider that an active researcher frequenting an area makes it more important for BF to keep silent to avoid giving away their locations.   Gun or camera,  a BF researcher is a hunter, and BF knows it.    

Edited by SWWASAS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Doug

I'm glad that I heard all the wood knocks that I have heard before wood knocks were a thing.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MIB

Cool.    Been a few years since I was up there.   My last time up, I dragged a friend's trailer to a mine site below Fairview Creek and we camped a couple nights.   Our previous trip we took her Rav 4 and it wouldn't pull Hardscrabble Grade 'cause of the large loose rocks and big holes.    Wish we'd had my truck.   If you're up exploring in there, Champion Creek is pretty funny.   Little bit of pucker factor once you pass "Smitty" Falls.   Kinda skinny but it opens up again before you get to the top.   I prefer going uphill to going downhill.   Another time I spent part of 4th of July weekend up there with a friend from Portland.   He got on my nerves a bit after a couple days.  Ticked me off enough I darn near lead him down Hardscrabble ... that was my signal to me that it was time for the weekend to end.   I don't think his BMW would have survived.

 

It is an area I'd look into a lot more if I were closer.

 

MIB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Madison5716

Where are these creeks, MIB? I didn't grow up around here, and there's so many creeks! The Bohemia Mines area has a history of sightings, as does Sharps Creek. So many possibilities, so little time and gasoline, lol! Not sure that I want to keep the truck, she guzzles gas, hence her name, "Guzzle". Still deciding on that. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MIB

All of the places I mentioned are up behind the "town" of Culp Creek where you turned off forest road 22 to go to Sharps Creek.  

 

If you go up Sharps Creek, the road is paved and follows the creek a long ways.    I believe the pavement ends at Fairview Creek.   There's a rec area, rest area, trail up fairview that goes past some old mining equipment.   There's a private road to a mine or two in the creek.   The main road turns to cobbles there and climbs steeply.   This is Hardscrabble Grade.    The top of Hardscrabble Grade is Bohemia Saddle.

 

Alternatively, if you go past the turnoff to Sharps Creek and continue up Brice Creek on the 22 road, you'll pass some rec areas.  Watch for Hobo Camp.   Champion Creek is past Hobo Camp. After some miles, you'll see the turnoff, to the right, for forest road 2212.   This is Champion Creek.   The road numbering is misleading, it may have another number as well.   That road is best driven from bottom to top because it's seriously skinny in places and by going this way, if you meet someone, you'll be against the rock wall instead of over the cliff if there's any backing up needed to get around each other.    A short ways up Champion Creek there's a turnoff to Noonday Ridge.   This is a moderate four wheel drive trail and probably should be avoided.    It was written up in one of the national four wheeling magazines 20-ish years ago.    Just a little farther is Smith (aka "Smitty") Falls ... definitely picture-worthy.    Proceed CAREFULLY .. if you don't like what you're seeing there is only one more place to turn around, otherwise it's a long back-out with significant pucker.    (Or at least that's how I remember it.)    Once you get through the middle canyon and break into the headwaters of the creek, the road opens up, passes some mines, and eventually hits the ridge road about 2 miles east of Bohemia Saddle ... the top of Hardscrabble Grade.

 

Yet more alternatively, if you don't like Champion Creek, stay along Brice Creek.   Turn off road 22 onto road 2213.    This is a good, pretty wide, USFS road.    It loops around to the top of the ridge.   Champion Creek connects to it at the top.    Look for Musick Guard Station.   No water, have to haul it in.  There are BF reports there.   Continue along the ridge.  Somewhere 2213 becomes 2460 and goes to Bohemia Saddle where Hardscrabble Grade leads back to Sharps Creek.    That's a great drive from top down if you have good reliable brakes.   Along the way you'd pass a couple of mines.    On one hairpin corner, there's a mine shaft (with a metal grate blocking it).    I stopped there, got out to let my brakes cool and just generally take in the "vibe."   I had one of the strongest senses of being watched that I can remember there.    If you do drop down Hardscrabble, be careful not to go south on the 2358 road.   It seemed to be the better road when I was there but it goes into the North Umpqua down Steamboat Creek or Canton Creek.   Haven't driven it .. seems like a pretty drive but not one to do accidentally (in other words, being lost :)) .  

 

For even more adventure, one time I went through Oakridge, towards Hills Creek Reservoir, took Larison Creek / USFS 2106, then 5850, then either the 737 or 744 minor spur across to the 2213, then on to Bohemia Saddle.   That took a good 4 hours and most of the time I was functionally lost and very happy to have left Oakridge with a full tank plus 2 5-gallon jerry cans of gas.

 

Fun big country.   Lot of places are not that far apart but the roads do not go from A to B without going through P, Q, and twice through Z to get there.    

 

MIB

 

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Madison5716

Wow, thanks for the fantastic details! I very much appreciate all that typing! We were knocking around at the beginnings of those creeks, Brice and Sharps. Looks like GREAT squatching area. I've  heard from Tobe Johnson that there's lots of sightings up thataway, too. I also want to try gold panning, which my kid woukd like. Thanks, MIB!

 

Going to check out that structure on the lake this weekend in my new kayak. Can't wait, should be fun!

 

 

20190820_173259.jpg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Catmandoo
Posted (edited)

^^^ Is the image a stock image?  I do not see a floatation vest / jacket. A whistle?   Cold water is under rated as extremely dangerous.

In Oregon, Black Cat Mining and Armadillo Mining Supply are places for supplies. Recreational prospecting in your area may not require permits. Check with the BLM.  Depending on fish spawning timing, you may have seasonal restrictions that limit access to prospecting areas. Never trespass on a claim. There will be little yellow metal placards on the corners of the claims. Know before you go.

Prospecting is hard work. Family prospecting activities are common ( slave labor ).

 

Oregon seems like that when Mazama blew up, the whole state was sprinkled with a little bit of gold.

Edited by Catmandoo
more text
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BC witness

Ditto on the PFD, they're a nuisance to wear, but quite literally a life saver.

 

Gotcha on the slave labour, I had 3 teenagers and my wife along when I worked my claim. They usually got more gold than me, too!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Madison5716

I took off the life jacket for the pix. It added another foot and i looked as wide as the kayak, lol. Oh, and the water is about 3 feet deep and fairly warm. The sides of the slough are just out of frame on either side. I wore it otherwise :)

 

I'll check out the gold panning info, thanks! 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Madison5716
Posted (edited)

Date & Time - August 24, 2019; 7:30 - 9:00pm; dusk and moonless nightfall. 

Weather - 75°F and gorgeous 

Location - McKenzie River

What Happened - Went out along the river last night where I had my first experiences 7 years ago. Didn't see anything or hear anything unusual.  Thankfully, that included cougars; I've seen their prints there before. Did see numerous "No Trespassing" signs (which we respected) and at least one trail cam, though. Those weren't there before.

 

If the bigfoots were once there, they aren't now.

 

You can watch on my YouTube channel,  Lane County Bigfooters. 

20190824_203839.jpg

Edited by Madison5716

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Huntster
4 hours ago, Madison5716 said:

I took off the life jacket for the pix. It added another foot and i looked as wide as the kayak, lol...........

 

LOL........"Do I look fat in this pfd?"

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SWWASAS
Posted (edited)

Sadly up on Northern Oregon lately there have been a bunch of downings.    If you think you look big in a PFD you look way worse having been in the water 3 or 4 days.   Do us a big favor and get the picture on dry land or forgo it altogether and wear the PFD.   

 

Interesting that I have been prospecting lately too.      Within 70 miles of where I live the biggest gold discovery in the State of Washington is someplace.    A Mexican man and his son brought out over a million dollars in gold before they were both killed by the Native Americans.   Other than the NA no one else knows where it might be.  Looking at the geology of the region and what little is known I have some idea of where it might be.    But my fear is that the Mexicans purposely misled others where the mine was.  Hopefully the NA are not still protecting the mine.  

Edited by SWWASAS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Huntster

LOL.........that old "lost mine" legend is everywhere except here in Alaska, where there is still a lot of gold to be easily dug up, but where every square inch of the state is claimed. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...