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Madison5716

Searching For Bigfoot in Oregon - Take 2

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NorthWind
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OK, here ya go...

 

 

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Tylo

Great videos Madison5716 and NorthWind!  

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Doug

Could the tree damage be pileated woodpeckers? The ones behind my dad's house leave tree damage similar to that tree.

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BigTreeWalker
26 minutes ago, Doug said:

Could the tree damage be pileated woodpeckers? The ones behind my dad's house leave tree damage similar to that tree.

That is also my thought. I've seen them do damage to live trees as well as dead trees. 

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NorthWind
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12 hours ago, Doug said:

Could the tree damage be pileated woodpeckers? The ones behind my dad's house leave tree damage similar to that tree.

Yes, that's possible. I just have never seen that kind of damage from a woodpecker before. That wood certainly was not punky at all, and I could not see any insect damage either. 

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hiflier
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Family of porcupines? They like the softwoods. Shredding from the claws gripping the fibers while chewing the bark off?

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NorthWind
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It seemed too high off the ground to me to be porcupine damage. I know they climb, but I haven't seen one in these woods. They are primarily on the other side of the Cascades from where I was. No identitiable teeth marks, either. So, I would vote pileated woodpecker outside of the squatch world. I had no idea a bird can tear stuff up that badly.

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BigTreeWalker

Porcupines simply strip the bark. They are after the inner layer. They can do it at any height on the tree and they are present on both sides of the Cascades. But, they don't chew wood like a beaver. As NorthWind says there would also be evidence of teeth marks. About 1/4 " wide parallel marks on the tree. 

However, I have seen the damage pileated woodpeckers can do to a tree dead or alive. Somewhere here a while back I posted some pictures of 30' tall Douglas firs that had their tops knocked out of them by pileated woodpeckers. 

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Madison5716
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I guess I'm guessing bear, as the most most obviously candidate. Just didn't see any claw marks. Weird.

 

20200111_130131.jpg

Edited by Madison5716

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Doug

Bears tend to "ring" a tree when they eat the cambian (spelling? ) layer of the tree and it is usually low to the ground. If they are going for grubs, it is usually by ripping bark off or tearing up rotten or punky wood in my experience. I'm not saying it's not, I have just never seen or heard of a bear doing this kind of damage.

 

Pileated woodpeckers, on the other hand, will do damage like that on a favorite tree. We had a "woodpecker tree" about half that diameter completely cut in two from them constantly pecking that tree. I sat and watched them through binos at 50 yards away to study their method. They will throw rather large chunks of wood as the peck through. 

Edited by Doug
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Catmandoo
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Black bear of Washington. Old image, about 3,000' altitude and not this time of year.bear_scrape.thumb.JPG.77e83cd01020ebcae251cad2359815cb.JPG

 

 

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BigTreeWalker
10 hours ago, Catmandoo said:

Black bear of Washington. Old image, about 3,000' altitude and not this time of year.bear_scrape.thumb.JPG.77e83cd01020ebcae251cad2359815cb.JPG

 

 

Just curious. Did you see the bear doing that? Because with the parallel teeth scores I would say that was a porcupine. There's no scale to go by but the claw marks are smaller and comparable to the size of the incisor scores. The bark is not ripped it's actually sheared off. 

 

I have pictures of bear damage and it usually includes claw marks as they tear the bark off. Sorry the pictures aren't on my cell phone so I can't post them now. 

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Madison5716
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We have definite plans to return to the spot, so we'll keep our eyes and ears open for more unusual finds. This area has amazing potential, and it's less than 7 miles from where we've found prints (not sure exactly how far, but close).

 

I can't wait to get back there!

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NorthWind
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16 minutes ago, Madison5716 said:

We have definite plans to return to the spot, so we'll keep our eyes and ears open for more unusual finds. This area has amazing potential, and it's less than 7 miles from where we've found prints (not sure exactly how far, but close).

 

I can't wait to get back there!

It's only just over a mile (to the closer prints, where the blue "tri-orb" thing was photographed), as the crow flies.

 

And me, too!

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Catmandoo
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BTW, I did not see the animal that removed the bark. Old image, from May 2012. I checked my files for images to scale the tree size and height off of the ground with no luck. I have not seen porcupines in this area.  Mountain beaver burrow system is close by.

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