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Madison5716

Searching For Bigfoot in Oregon - Take 2

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NatFoot

@MIB

 

That may help in the coastal areas of the PNW...but fish don't spawn from headwaters all over the US/CA where these things are supposed to live.

 

CO/WY/ID/MI/KY on and on..

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Catmandoo
3 hours ago, NatFoot said:

where these things are supposed to live.

 

Still on the fence?

The comments on salmon spawning refer to a category of fish known as 'anadromous'. Anadromous fish live in salt water and spawn in fresh water. You would have a hard time finding a very late run of salmon spawning  right now.  On the east coast, a popular anadromous fish is the striped bass.

Catadromous fish live in fresh water and spawn in salt water. And you have your lake and river types; trout and bass are easy examples.  The salmon and steelhead in the Great Lakes are transplants from the PNW.

A variety of fish are available in between snacking on deer, bears, other mammals and reptiles.

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Madison5716
Posted (edited)

I have a county map on my bedroom wall. On it is a market for every Class A and Class B sighting/evidence  in the past 20 years in my county. Almost all of the sightings occur near lakes, rivers or creeks.

 

If I can find a water source, evidence of game and lots of tree cover (and few / no humans), then it's a good place to investigate (per Reo/SnowWalkerPrime/Christopher Noel). It's worked pretty well so far!

Edited by Madison5716
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wiiawiwb
On 2/27/2019 at 10:26 PM, Catmandoo said:

^^^^^ 16" tall rubber boots. No fashion or brand loyalty involved. Dry happy feet. Plus you can wander into shallow water looking for all kinds of animal signs.  Put a notch in the heel so when you meander and double back. you will know that they are your tracks. The tread pattern on 'non' fashion boots should be unique enough.  I have seen heel impressions that looked like moose tracks.

 

Using a vapor barrier or truly waterproof boots like rubber boots (Muks) work perfectly. They do come with a few downsides. One, is you need to bring extra socks if going on an overnight as the socks inside the vapor barrier/rubber boots will wet out. I can speak from vast experience but the one time I tried a friend's Muks I was not happy with the way they performed on a hike. I didn't like the flexibility of them while I hiked and was concerned a sharp rock or tree root might pierce the rubber boot. Having said that, I see a lot of TV shows where people in Alaska use rubber boots all the time.

 

How have you found your rubber boots when hiking in them all day? Have you found them resistant to sharp objects?

 

Here's one I've been considering for winter use:

 

https://www.muckbootcompany.com/collections/cold-snow/products/mens-arctic-outpost-lace-short-boots

 

 

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NatFoot
13 hours ago, Catmandoo said:

 

Still on the fence?

The comments on salmon spawning refer to a category of fish known as 'anadromous'. Anadromous fish live in salt water and spawn in fresh water. You would have a hard time finding a very late run of salmon spawning  right now.  On the east coast, a popular anadromous fish is the striped bass.

Catadromous fish live in fresh water and spawn in salt water. And you have your lake and river types; trout and bass are easy examples.  The salmon and steelhead in the Great Lakes are transplants from the PNW.

A variety of fish are available in between snacking on deer, bears, other mammals and reptiles.

 

I'm not on the fence. I'm a believer just like I've stated many times before. Fish do not spawn everywhere BF are supposedly living.

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Catmandoo
7 hours ago, wiiawiwb said:

How have you found your rubber boots when hiking in them all day? Have you found them resistant to sharp objects?

 

The rubber boots that I have are old, american made, called "XtraTuf".  Insulated. They work well with felt insoles and merino wool socks. I use gaitors  to keep the bugs and debris out. I have used them for hiking and snowshoeing. I avoid sharp objects and the soles are durable. My boots are getting old. I have considered Muck boots.  I have to take another look at XtraTufs. The production shifted to China several years ago and the boots were junk. They delaminated, fell apart. They were not built on american lasts. I could not wear them. They have changed production and now the company has Muck boots. They have gone from a work boot to work boot with fashionable decorations. Back in the day, when the boots got old, we would cut the uppers off and trim them above the ankles to be similar to high top Keds and called them "Ketchikan Sneakers".

Boot selection is not easy. Some people need serious ankle support and pull-on boots can't do that.

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Huntster
4 hours ago, NatFoot said:

.........Fish do not spawn everywhere BF are supposedly living.

 

True, but the same is true of black bear habitat. I saw a video this morning of a very large rattlesnake somewhere in the southwest (it was coiled up under a mesquite bush), and my first thought was shooting it. My second thought was of eating it (today is one of my days of fasting, and I'm hungry.........everything looks like food today).

 

Fish don't need to be anadromous in order to be available for predators, but when they are anadromous, they're on a general schedule, and that schedule can be a tool to predict predator behavior. 

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wiiawiwb
15 hours ago, Catmandoo said:

 

The rubber boots that I have are old, american made, called "XtraTuf".  Insulated. They work well with felt insoles and merino wool socks. I use gaitors  to keep the bugs and debris out. I have used them for hiking and snowshoeing. I avoid sharp objects and the soles are durable. My boots are getting old. I have considered Muck boots.  I have to take another look at XtraTufs. The production shifted to China several years ago and the boots were junk. They delaminated, fell apart. They were not built on american lasts. I could not wear them. They have changed production and now the company has Muck boots. They have gone from a work boot to work boot with fashionable decorations. Back in the day, when the boots got old, we would cut the uppers off and trim them above the ankles to be similar to high top Keds and called them "Ketchikan Sneakers".

Boot selection is not easy. Some people need serious ankle support and pull-on boots can't do that.

 

The feedback I've seen from the hiking/backpacking community is that "muk"-style books are terrible to hike in for any measurable distance. As you said, little or no support and the bottoms aren't always designed well for going up and down terrain.

 

Now that I have a 'hot' tent (has a woodstove) that I backpack with, it does open up the possibilities for footwear. I'd prefer to wet out socks rather than wet out boots. The socks can be dried easily with the woodstove. The boots, not so easily.

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Huntster
1 hour ago, wiiawiwb said:

..........I have a 'hot' tent (has a woodstove) that I backpack with..........

 

Huh. It's small/light enough to backpack with? I musta' missed that in your previous posts. What make/model is that tent/stove combo?

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Catmandoo
8 hours ago, wiiawiwb said:

 

The feedback I've seen from the hiking/backpacking community is that "muk"-style books are terrible to hike in for any measurable distance. As you said, little or no support and the bottoms aren't always designed well for going up and down terrain.

 

A co-worker wore Muck boots to work.  Surprised, I had to ask about them.  "They were like slippers". Many 'rubber' boots do not have a steel shank which is a big problem.  

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Huntster

I wear Mucks around the house in winter and when running the Argo. They go on easy, are warm, and are waterproof. They have a great non-slip sole, but they aren't hiking boots. I've walked a few miles through tussocks in them, though.

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Catmandoo

Have you tried Mukluks as in Steger brand Mukluks?   From Minnesota.

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Huntster

Nope. I pretty much wear sneakers or light hiking boots unless I'm going ice fishing or snowmobiling, then I wear bunny boots. 

 

My wife wears Uggs around town.

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Madison5716
Posted (edited)

I made a short video for what I carry in my day pack, in my truck and on my person when I'm out in the woods bigfooting, fishing or hiking.

 

I wear weather appropriate clothing. In winter I'm wearing merino wool long underwear, wool hiking socks, waterproof hiking boots, full size raiders, soft shell waterproof pants, a long sleeve merino tee shirt, a wool sweater (worn or in my pack, depending on how cold it is), a merino wool dickie collar, a warm hat, a belt, and my primaloft anorak.

 

My day pack carries essentials. It is designed for three things - comfort, emergencies and research. It will help me handle emergencies and get me back to my truck.

 

My kid's pack is the same, but without redundancies. If it's too heavy, he won't carry it, which defeats the purpose, so I keep it light. If he's not wearing it and were near the truck, , he has his picket knife, his Morakniv belt knife, an emergency blanket in his back pocket and a whistle. He never ventures far from me, so I am getting odds that it's enough. I tell him he needs to carry it in case he finds interesting things that he wants to keep... Like rocks. He's a rockhound and I am not carrying his rock finds!!!

 

My truck is awesome! It has the following items - vehicle maintenance stuff, two 30 degree sleeping bags, a Dutch oven, a Kelly Kettle, dry kindling, a big first aid kit, a big water filter, trash bags, slingshots, a frisbee, extra wool socks, duct tape, rope, extra balaclavas, 3 gallons of water in various water bottles and jugs, dog food/jacket/bowl/towel/old wool blanket, a full change of clothing for myself and my son, an extra large fleece pullover for a friend, 2 camp chairs, binoculars, and food for four people for three days plus dishes and cooking essentials. In the summer I will probably throw in my tent and fishing poles/licenses! It's getting too small, lol...

 

Comfort - lip balm, lotion (I have eczema), a handkerchief, snacks and water.

 

Research - fully charged cell phone, a camcorder, zip lock bag, paper bag and tiny pill bag, and a measuring tape. I carry a full footprint casting kit in my truck.

 

Emergencies - bivy sack, lxg trash bag, paracord, a multiple means fire starting kit, first aid kit, first aid booklet, first aid & CPR certification, a headlamp with extra batteries, a phone charger battery, an extra water bladder, purification tablets, and a water filter.

 

What I carry on my person at all times  - a trekking pole, my Morakniv belt knife, pocket multitool from Cabelas ($5!), lighter, fire steel, emergency blanket, an emergency whistle, a tissue, and sometimes my gun (depends on the location and circumstances).

 

I think that's it! I'm sure I've forgotten something...

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=YFsJcVNgu3k

 

Edited by Madison5716
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Madison5716
Posted (edited)

Ugh, autocorrect, "raiders" = gaiters.

 

How do I turn off autocorrect? It's making me crazy. I hate spelling mistakes!!!

 

We also carry ultralight rain jackets.

 

In addition, we wear sunglasses, and in summer, we carry bug spray and sunscreen.

 

If I'm not carrying my gun, I usually carry bear spray and pepper spray. 

 

I really want to get one of those GPS emergency licator beacon things.

 

I went to REI and found some winter insulated Keen boots; I have foot issues and Keens are my go-to boots. Anything else and I'm hobbling around by the end of the day having to ice my feet. Better yet, they were on sale! During our snow storm last week I shredded my old boots - literally ripped them from the sole. Whoops! Bad timing.

 

 

Edited by Madison5716

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