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Madison5716

Searching For Bigfoot in Oregon

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Madison5716

 

Date & Time - Saturday,  Feb. 1 from 11 -2pm

Location  - Oregon Cascades

Weather  - 40° and miserable 

What Happened  - NorthWind and I went out and hiked a few miles up a dirt road in a likely area. It rained for three hours and we got very wet. That is all.

 

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Edited by Madison5716
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wiiawiwb

The two of you are doing some great work.  A few thoughts about the footprints which it appears there were many.

 

Can you isolate a single trackway where no other prints are nearby? If so, and if you can closely observe the area near the trackway to convince yourselves there are no other that hoaxer prints near them, then you can be sure the prints are were left by whomever or whatever walked there.  It's like finding a trackway in snow. It is impossible to fake it as the hoaxer's prints would appear.

 

Once you are convinced the trackway is legit I would do a step reenactment, like NW was doing, except I would do it in barefeet and then compare your prints to the trackway prints. Look for depth in the mud and dynamics of foot movement of the foot and toes, and for a mid-tarsal break. Obviously, the bottom of the print should not be flat. What's left in your reenactment print should look similar but not identical to the trackway you found. 

 

Too bad you don't have one of those scanners we saw on Expedition Bigfoot. You could scan several of the prints and email them to Dr Meldrum for analysis.

 

The step length of 35" doesn't sound enormous but I think anyone who tries to do it especially barefoot in a mud field would find it is not easily accomplished. How far away are you from civilization?

Edited by wiiawiwb

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BigTreeWalker
5 minutes ago, wiiawiwb said:

Look for depth in the mud

All that you suggested is a very good way to research the track ways. 

However, if you are familiar with the Pacific Northwest you know that track depth only has any meaning if the tracks are fresh. The reason being is that moisture content definitely determines track depth. Being close to a reservoir as these tracks are, the mud can go from easily walked on to sinking to your ankles in just a few days and vice versa. It isn't a matter of weight so much as moisture content. Which is just something to keep in mind. 

 

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NorthWind

@wiiawiwb and @BigTreeWalker The moisture content is indeed a factor. But in that last video, it had been raining for three days straight. The ground was about as wet as it is going to get, aside from when the lake rises to a level to cover them. Some of them (the ones I really had a hard time keeping pace with) were much further apart than 35 inches. They were in the 48" range. No signs of running or jumping. Those prints were only 8 or 9 inches long, while my bare foot is just shy of 12 inches. Since this is the fourth time we have found these 3 sizes of prints together, in 3 different locations now (within a few miles of each other), I tend to think this is not a hoax. No signs of it at all. No other tracks that indicate it, though we do occasionally find some tracks that look like they have been laid down with boots. But the boots are bigger than my size 12's. It doesn't seem very likely that a 8 or 9" print would come from those. But I suppose it's possible. Just not probable. At all. 

 

As for walking barefoot for a comparison, I am not sure I want to risk slicing my foot open on some glass, metal, or sharp stone, and I for sure don't want to pick up a fish hook. I kind of need my feet for the work I do in "real life".

 

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BigTreeWalker

I am very impressed with the track ways that you have found. The step length is so much longer than an average human with feet of that size can make. And no slipping or sliding seen.

However, watching the videos and seeing the plants upright and growing in the tracks makes them not fresh tracks. My point was that if one is to try to use track depth to determine weight, which happens a lot in bigfoot research, unless you are there within hours of the tracks being made there is really no objective way to try to determine the weight of the maker. Soil texture and moisture content is still different even if it's currently raining and everything is wet. My opinion is that those tracks were probably made during or shortly after the reservoir receded. Madison has shown the difference in soil texture. Sinking in when closer to the water and not as much higher up. 

I have found tracks in the nine inch range near lakes but since the step and stride was average for a human, that's what I interpreted them to be. Even though they were 2" deep and I could hardly leave a mark in the mud. But in that case they had been made when the lake level was higher, maybe as much as two months earlier. 

But as I said above the tracks you have found impress me. 

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Madison5716
13 hours ago, BigTreeWalker said:

However, watching the videos and seeing the plants upright and growing in the tracks makes them not fresh tracks.

 

The plants were already growing there when they were stepped on. Things grow in Oregon with a bit of rain and sunshine at a phenomenal rate. The main track area gets a lot of sun. 

 

I look for how crumbly or smooth the sides of the print are. If its smooth, then it's probably been rained on, so you can guesstimate age from the last time it rained. The unending rain does mean that prints get degraded and washed out over time, so new prints on top of old, will look very different. 

 

We keep an eye on old prints and new. It's not that difficult to tell them apart, when you return to the same spot over and over.

Edited by Madison5716

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NorthWind

@BigTreeWalker Thanks, yes, I appreciate your insight! Yes, I originally thought the same thing! I figured they were much older, and made when the waterline was higher. I tried to convince Madison, too! LOL  Since we have been going out there on a semi-regular basis though, my thoughts on that have changed. Yes, there are plants in some of them. Growing upright, even. I have seen some of the prints out there change over the course of a week's period, with rain in between. One good rain degrades those prints pretty fast. And plants grow like weeds here (bad pun). They are all over the place. You have to step on them or you would never get anywhere. Even if you step on them, they spring right back again. I've witnessed it. These last prints were pretty new. Laid down within the last couple of days I would think at the oldest. And for certain, much later than the draining of the lake. If I had to bet on a timeframe, I would say within 24 hours. But, that is my best guesstimate based on my experiences out there.

 

@Madison5716 you beat me to it.  :yes:

Edited by NorthWind
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Madison5716

There's a real easy way to judge if prints are new, or old.

 

If they weren't there last time, they are new  🤣

 

Next time we're out there, we will try to do a video and step on them and see what they do. I may even take my shoe off, carefully, but we'll see. I need my feet whole, too and it's rocky etc.

Edited by Madison5716
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hiflier
1 hour ago, Madison5716 said:

There's a real easy way to judge if prints are new, or old.

 

If they weren't there last time, they are new 

 

Excellent point! :lol:

Edited by hiflier
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MIB
2 hours ago, Madison5716 said:

There's a real easy way to judge if prints are new, or old.

 

If they weren't there last time, they are new  🤣

 

Yep.  .. and video / photographs of the area is the best way to be absolutely sure.  

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BigTreeWalker
4 hours ago, Madison5716 said:

There's a real easy way to judge if prints are new, or old.

 

If they weren't there last time, they are new  🤣

 

Next time we're out there, we will try to do a video and step on them and see what they do. I may even take my shoe off, carefully, but we'll see. I need my feet whole, too and it's rocky etc.

I agree with you there. But all I have to go on are the statements you've made in your videos. I've heard you say that you aren't sure if tracks you see were ones you've seen before. If you're certain they weren't there before and you now when you were in the vicinity last, yes I would say they were fairly fresh. And yes I do live in the PNW and know how much it rains here and the effects it has on tracks. 

I would suggest that you devise a way to mark those track ways you find and continue to come back observing the changes over time. 

Don't hurt your feet trying to place a track. Boots do suffice if they are of similar size. However a smaller foot will impress deeper than a larger one. It's more a function of surface area than weight. 

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Madison5716

What i would really like to do is get a drone. Then, we could take aerial photos of the area each time and compare each time. That would be sooo helpful. 

 

Usually NorthWind and i look at tracks and jog each other's memory about what was where. It's a blessing and a pleasure to have the problem of keeping track of multiple track lines at multiple visits! NorthWind, we should figure out some kind of map and keep a log. Might be too late now - who knew we'd be this successful - but maybe now and for next mud season?

 

I didn't mean to sound defensive. I'm not feeling well today. Should not have hiked 3 hours in the rain on Saturday. And I didn't realize, or I forgot, that you're in the PNW, BigTree. 

 

After I fix my truck, get my concealed carry permit and buy a Garmin Mini, a small drone is next on my list! Even for average quality pictures, it'll be useful. What a great research tool it will be.

 

Plus, they are just cool!

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hiflier

For on the cheap? Score the tops of some flat rocks with some kind of markings you would recognize. Then have different colors painted on their bottoms to mark dates with indelible felt tips. They only have to last a short time until you can get set up with some higher tech stuff. Mark the different flat rock locations on your GPS and take you photos/videos of the different areas. When finished stomp the rocks in flush with the soil with your dates written on the bottoms of them. Your image/video time/date stamps should correlate with the "date stamps" on the bottoms of the flat rocks.Then you can always go back via GPS and make later comparisons.

 

*Note* If your rocks are long and narrow you could place your score marks at one end to point to a compass direction that the tracks were heading in. 

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NorthWind
3 hours ago, Madison5716 said:

NorthWind, we should figure out some kind of map and keep a log. Might be too late now - who knew we'd be this successful - but maybe now and for next mud season?

 

Yes, I think that would be a great idea, @Madison5716. We need an aerial shot of the area before it gets filled back up.

 

2 hours ago, hiflier said:

For on the cheap? Score the tops of some flat rocks with some kind of markings you would recognize. Then have different colors painted on their bottoms to mark dates with indelible felt tips. They only have to last a short time until you can get set up with some higher tech stuff. Mark the different flat rock locations on your GPS and take you photos/videos of the different areas. When finished stomp the rocks in flush with the soil with your dates written on the bottoms of them. Your image/video time/date stamps should correlate with the "date stamps" on the bottoms of the flat rocks.Then you can always go back via GPS and make later comparisons.

 

*Note* If your rocks are long and narrow you could place your score marks at one end to point to a compass direction that the tracks were heading in. 

 

This is a good idea. I've got an angle grinder and a masonry wheel - easy enough to make some marks. Groovy idea, @hiflier (bad pun).

 

I know, I'll collect up a couple dozen rocks next time, and have Madison pack them out! :devil:   <ducking>

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Madison5716

In your dreams. 💩

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