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Madison5716

Searching For Bigfoot in Oregon

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Catmandoo

For a date stamp, take an image of the front page of a daily newspaper at the start of your mission.  I do not know if you have / use a GPS unit.  Depending on the brand and features, you may be able to take GPS positions, then upload your way points to map software. You will have your own special maps. Black and white is good. You will burn through a lot of green ink if you choose the color presentation. I have a DeLorme GPS that is a glorified brick.  Garmin bought DeLorme so my GPS is 'brick-like', can't change the date. Thanks Garmin.  However, the classic DeLorme Gazetteer is still available for 50 states. Funny thing about the Gazetteer is the place that you want to go to is under the staples.

 

A guy from Maine posted about flat rocks and felt tip markers. Wow. I am in pointy rock territory. Catmandoo no can do.   

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BigTreeWalker
9 hours ago, Madison5716 said:

What i would really like to do is get a drone. Then, we could take aerial photos of the area each time and compare each time. That would be sooo helpful. 

 

Usually NorthWind and i look at tracks and jog each other's memory about what was where. It's a blessing and a pleasure to have the problem of keeping track of multiple track lines at multiple visits! NorthWind, we should figure out some kind of map and keep a log. Might be too late now - who knew we'd be this successful - but maybe now and for next mud season?

 

I didn't mean to sound defensive. I'm not feeling well today. Should not have hiked 3 hours in the rain on Saturday. And I didn't realize, or I forgot, that you're in the PNW, BigTree. 

 

After I fix my truck, get my concealed carry permit and buy a Garmin Mini, a small drone is next on my list! Even for average quality pictures, it'll be useful. What a great research tool it will be.

 

Plus, they are just cool!

No worries. I do hope you get feeling better. 

There are some good ideas of keeping track of things here. I carry a write in the rain field journal with me. Which I use to keep track of my outings and what I find. I use All In One Offline Maps. Which is a free GPS/map app that you can install on your phone. With it I can look at topo or sat maps and place way points with pictures. Needless to say it's cheap and easy to use after a little learning curve. I use it extensively in my research. Since it works offline you just load the maps of your area ahead of time. Then it can be used even without cell service, which is pretty much nonexistent where I go. Just another available tool to use and it's free. 

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Madison5716

I will look into that app. Sounds interesting! I sm a bit of a technaphobe, though. I'm lucky I know how to record. 

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SWWASAS

I use a similar app so I can load USGS maps on my phone and know where I am out of cell phone coverage.     The down side of that is when your phone GPS is active,  you burn through battery very fast.    An external battery or solar panel charger is a good idea if you plan on using the app very much.  

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BigTreeWalker

I don't have so much problem with the GPS on my phone as I do with the phone searching for service. I just put my phone into airplane mode when away from service. The battery lasts a lot longer. If I'm still worried about battery life I simply shut the phone down when I don't need it. I also carry an extra battery with me when I'm out for days at a time. I have solar charging capability when I'm in camp so I recharge my phone each night. 

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SWWASAS

I had not thought about airplane mode but that is a good idea.     I have a solar panel designed for back packers that can recharge the phone if I need to but sitting and waiting while it does that seems like a big waste of time.    The external battery charger thing is a lot faster.     Of course the reality of it is, that unless I have an objective that I have never been to before,  I rarely need the mapping function unless I want to double check that I have found the right trail or like one time I was looking for an old mine.   I have a Garmin GPS but it's tiny screen and weight makes it very undesirable to carry.  

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BigTreeWalker

I also don't use my phone app or Garmin GPS that much. If I want to check out what an area looks like or mark a spot I use it. Yes I have gotten turned around occasionally. I'll use it then to give me a direction to go. The nice thing about a Sat photo is that I can see and find visual clues as to where I am. Which my phone can do and my Garmin can't. Meadows, marshes. ponds, even large snags. 

My solar panel set up is for a stationary camp and I charge a 12v battery. Which I then use to charge my other equipment. 

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MIB
18 hours ago, SWWASAS said:

I had not thought about airplane mode but that is a good idea.     I have a solar panel designed for back packers that can recharge the phone if I need to but sitting and waiting while it does that seems like a big waste of time.    The external battery charger thing is a lot faster.     Of course the reality of it is, that unless I have an objective that I have never been to before,  I rarely need the mapping function unless I want to double check that I have found the right trail or like one time I was looking for an old mine.   I have a Garmin GPS but it's tiny screen and weight makes it very undesirable to carry.  

 

After having my phone go dead, I learned to turn to airplane mode when I'm out of cell service.    I have a small external battery pack that I can recharge the phone with via USB and it has a small solar panel in the back, however, it's kind of a brick to be packing around.     I think it is a good idea to keep in the vehicle on road trips because though slow the solar recharge option means you're never permanently out of power.   (Thinkin' here about James Kim and family ... it was eventually the pings off a cell tower, even though they didn't have enough juice to get a call or text out, which lead to the rescue of his wife and children.   If they had been able to recharge and continue sending now and then, perhaps rescue would have come sooner and he would not have died.)

 

I have a Garmin (Etrex H, I think) with the 1-1/8" screen.  Agree that it is a pain because the screen is so small, but it is still useful.   I don't usually do a lot of navigation by GPS, instead,  I create waypoints for things I find interesting in the field and transfer those to Google Earth.   I also run a track so I can see where I have been.   I spend a good bit of time out looking for abandoned trails.   Back in wilderness areas, off known / established trails, when I find old electrical insulators or the remains of sawed logs or stumps, I mark them.  Eventually those form a line and I know where the old trail was .. roughly .. so I can go back and suss out the details.

 

MIB

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georgerm
On 2/24/2019 at 1:01 PM, Madison5716 said:

 

 

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A good GPS locating device is a must when getting too far off an established trail. Fear and confusion that sets in when lost is awful and deadly. 

 

This rough looking stick blind posted back a few pages,  may be used to ambush deer. It may be just a burn pile to help clean up a logging site.  It may have been piled by human labor. Were there other piles all over the area? If so, its a clean up burn pile.

 

If an ambush blind, the bigfoot lays low in it, and waits for a deer to walk by or a lone person. The prey comes from down wind and the BF charges from a low crawl, then grabs the deer or who ever is walking by...……………     

 

I found probable ambush blind near Reedsport, Oregon and posted a picture on the forum somewhere. 

Edited by georgerm

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MIB
5 hours ago, georgerm said:

Fear and confusion that sets in when lost is awful and deadly. 

 

For you perhaps.   I do not fear being lost.   I seek it out as a chance to see something new, experience novelty, have a bit of adventure.   I find it a relief from dullness.  

 

MIB

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Catmandoo
8 hours ago, georgerm said:

Fear and confusion that sets in when lost is awful and deadly.

 

"Fear is never boring"............quoting inactive member b s ruther.

 

Stick piles: couple years ago when I was camping in southern Oregon, I saw piles of debris. My impression was work done by Forest Service / trail crews to pile up 'fuel'. Some locations had pieces of white plastic covering the debris. The crews littered the work sites with their empty water bottles. I never figured out the white plastic sheeting. It was at least 6 mil thickness.

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wiiawiwb
6 hours ago, MIB said:

 

For you perhaps.   I do not fear being lost.   I seek it out as a chance to see something new, experience novelty, have a bit of adventure.   I find it a relief from dullness.  

 

MIB

 

Nor do I but most people who have not been lost before find it absolutely frightening.  Darkness will settle in soon, you don't know where you are, you don't have a shelter or maybe even a means by which to start a fire. And you're a sitting duck in the dark.

 

I've taken wilderness survival training and am always prepared to stay the night if circumstance or tragedy befalls me.  I think everyone who goes out in the woods, even for a quick hike, should always carry something to make a shelter (painters 1 ml plastic 9"x12"), and start a fire (two Bic lighters - redundacy).   If you lose your way, you can hunker down, have a fire, think things through during the night, and begin your game plan in the morning.  

 

Dave Canterbury of Dual Survival has a lot of good videos about survival and also has classes you can attend at his school.

 

https://www.youtube.com/user/wildernessoutfitters

 

https://www.selfrelianceoutfitters.com/

 

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georgerm
7 hours ago, wiiawiwb said:

 

Nor do I but most people who have not been lost before find it absolutely frightening.  Darkness will settle in soon, you don't know where you are, you don't have a shelter or maybe even a means by which to start a fire. And you're a sitting duck in the dark.

 

I've taken wilderness survival training and am always prepared to stay the night if circumstance or tragedy befalls me.  I think everyone who goes out in the woods, even for a quick hike, should always carry something to make a shelter (painters 1 ml plastic 9"x12"), and start a fire (two Bic lighters - redundacy).   If you lose your way, you can hunker down, have a fire, think things through during the night, and begin your game plan in the morning.  

 

Dave Canterbury of Dual Survival has a lot of good videos about survival and also has classes you can attend at his school.

 

 

 

 

 

"most people who have not been lost before find it absolutely frightening"  Wiiawiwb understands this situation probably from experience.  This is the point that I'm making. My younger life included many excursions into the wilds of southern Oregon with no major mishaps such as getting lost, until this day more than thirty years ago. My memory is still good about the feeling of being lost that hit for the first time.

 

We parked the truck and headed into the flat tall fir forest with the sun as the direction finder. All of the bushes and trees looked the same. After a few hours of wandering and not finding a good Christmas tree we headed back to the truck. It was and hour before sunset, and the trees cast long shadows over the dark forest floor  with patches of snow. Now the way ahead had a new look with no landmarks. Soon the way back to the truck was not certain. We headed for the truck and hiked for about an hour over the flat confusing ground with no land marks.  When the truck was not where I expected to see it, some panic set in and I did not want to tell Chris we are lost.  When you finally admit this ..................................  a horrid gripping fear can take hold and you need to hold back panic.

 

We did not have the supplies that Wii suggests. Now the sun was low and dim and the temperature was just above freezing. I took another guess as to where the truck might be and walked less than a mile with Chris saying are we lost?  And thanks to the Lord the truck was sitting in plain sight. 

 

When nature decides to crack the whip as what happened to me well more than thirty years ago you gain a healthy respect for the wilds. The first lesson nature created as a sort of trap, so be careful when hiking a forest that is flat and all the trees and bushes look the same for ten miles or more.

Edited by georgerm
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SWWASAS

As a solo researcher I always have gear the spend the night.     All it takes is a sprain or a broken leg and you have no choice.     About a year ago I woke up in the middle of the night sleeping in a bed, and my knee was hurting so bad I could barely walk.   I was away from home and had to spend a couple of days getting better before I could even stand to drive the two hours home.     So a fairly debilitating injury can happen at any time without some dramatic injury.    Most place where I go do not have cell coverage.   I carry the PLB to compensate for that and get help if I need it.    I do go in the field in winter but only during good weather when the chance of hypothermia is low.    That is the demon that can get you because it robs you of your decision making abilities should something go wrong.      We are lucky that modern outdoor clothing is so much better than it used to be.  

 

  I have been with hiking companions that got hypothermia.     They were young adult relatives and decided to hike in spite of my reservations about the weather so I went along just because I was concerned about the deteriorating conditions.     Of course the hypothermia hit them before me and getting them out was a challenge.   They even argued with me about how to get out.     Because they had planned the hike I assumed that one of them would have a map.    Wrong.      It was in the Columbia River Gorge and I said well the quickest way out is go down towards the traffic noise.       I had to get pretty nasty with them to get them to abort the planned hike and make our way out.  Ticking people off can actually help them hold off hypothermia.   I told them next time they would be on their own because I would refuse to go.   Anyway when they got out and warmed up they realized how much trouble they had been in.  

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Catmandoo

 

6 hours ago, SWWASAS said:

They were young adult relatives

 

They should have had that app that helps them pull their heads out.

 

Whatever happened to the procedure of hiking a short distance, stopping, turning around and studying the landscape ( physical memory ) to 'see' what the return trip out will look like?  Then there is the bio-degradable flagging tape that can be used to mark the trail.

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