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Searching For Bigfoot in Oregon


Madison5716
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A local weather guy said this was once every thousand year event.     The high pressure zones normally are not as big and effect so much territory.    I would buy the once in a thousand T shirt if I thought it would not happen again.  

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Thank you for the video. That is a very clever way to create air conditioning. Freeze several of the gallon jugs and you're good to go. 

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You're welcome.  I'd purchased a cooler that was made in China and only partly functional, it's going back. So now I'm determined to make my own. I see the same guy made a bigger cooler in another vid.

Sorry to go off on a tangent!

 

Edited by JKH
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On 6/28/2021 at 2:02 PM, Madison5716 said:

It got up to 114°F yesterday. I moved from Phoenix because of that. Didn't expect it in Oregon. Thanks, climate chaos.


Look what’s going on in Europe! It’s cyclic. I remember recent July 4ths were I didn’t want to go outside to watch fireworks. Cold, rain, hail.

 

This summer here in the inland NW is like 4ths of old. Hay is going in barn dry and people actually want to swim to cool off.

 

 

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Just found this!
 

June 24th 2020

 

Kettle Falls Wa

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Posted (edited)

Thanks, @MontanaFooter!  The longer we do it, the more we learn and, and hopefully,  we'll get even more effective.

 

I think we really lucked into an amazing situation at "the charmed lake", and now, after the fires, we are dealing with similar conditions as most bigfoot researchers get in their areas. This year has definitely been more challenging. 

 

But it's still fun, and an adrenaline rush every time.

Edited by Madison5716
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We each have our "honey holes" that we go to for investigation.  We know the routes in and out, the terrain, water sources, choke points, and more, like the back of our hand. The fires you've had disrupts all of that which means you have to choose whether to stay put or temporarily seek out alternate locations to investigate. The latter involves a whole new learning process to learn the lay of the land.

 

Are there other places within a reasonable driving range that were unaffected by fires?

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3 hours ago, wiiawiwb said:

Are there other places within a reasonable driving range that were unaffected by fires?

 

Yep, and that's where we've been going. Trying to use Reo or Michael Merchant ideas on how to find them, because both their approaches are similar and produce results. But, a lot is simply driving around and getting out and exploring if we see something interesting. Pretty much EVERYWHERE around us could be viable habitat. Even the burn areas are growing back - hopefully enough to support the deer population, and hence, those that feed upon them. 

 

If they survived the fires, they had to go SOMEWHERE nearby. Fortunately, our sighting location was not affected, so there's that. We may start branching out to the county above and below us, IDK. Now that I don't have a dog (RIP Scout), I'm looking into camping more and that opens up some possibilities, too.

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Posted (edited)

Date & Time - Monday July 5 from 9pm-12 midnight.

Weather - perfect 70°F, no wind

Location- Oregon Cascades 

 

What Happened- NorthWind and I went out to the same location of our sighting last year on July 5, for the anniversary. 

 

We had 2 FLIR's, and we would search at random intervals, but neither of us ever saw even a hint of hairy giants. However, we got a half dozen "something in the salal forest" cracklings, and seven clear wood knocks. 

 

Three came wirhin 30 seconds of one another from ahead of us, to one side and behind us. The last 2 came when I'd packed up the truck, NorthWind got in and I snapped off the lantern (I cooked us cheeseburgers before we left); boom, immediately,  2 loud knocks from 2 sides. 

 

But we didn't see anything  - not an owl, or deer or mouse. Nada.

 

So, we may or may not have had action. We were fairly uncomfortable, but it was very, very dark, with only starlight (amazing!).

 

20210705_232414.jpg

 

It was dark, LOL!

 

20210705_231210.jpg

Edited by Madison5716
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I would call July 5th a very eventful and successful evening. Lots of wood knocks from different directions, juicy cheesburgers, and great company.

 

When I'm out and hear a wood knock I try as quickly as I can to pull up a detailed topo map (USGS Topo on GAIA) on my smartphone to try to get a general visual idea where the wood knock originated from. I add a waypoint on that spot.  Then, when home on my desktop using a large screen, I can pull up the area where I thought the wood knock came from. I'll study it carefully see if there are any clues as to why it would have been made there.

 

In your case, with multiple knocks, you might be able to find a pattern.  Maybe an open clearing is nearby several of them, or a creek, a ridge, or some other terrain feature.

 

It sounds like both of you are back in business.

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Multiple knocks, more than two, in my experience are warnings to other BF that there is danger (you) nearby.      I believe they use single knocks to allow other BF to know where they are.   Several times I have gotten a single knock in response to my truck door being slammed shut.  Because of the human factor of humans knocking,   I personally  do not believe in producing knocks.    Humans that do might as well be yelling "here I am" at the BF in the bush.    For all the knocking that the "Finding Bigfoot" cast did over the years,  other than a few return knocks,  human knocking sure did not yeald any sightings.   More commonly they would see the area go cold after a couple of hours of stomping around the woods and knocking.    I don't want them to know where I am so they could possibly blunder into me like they did on my first encounter.     

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Very rarely do we knock. When we do, it's usually when we have seen or heard nothing and are getting ready to head out of the area. Kind of a "last ditch effort" if you will.

 

We will occasionally whistle.

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Posted (edited)

Saturday,  July 17, 2021

 

Found a pretty little lake up near Waldo Lake in the Cascades. We may try hiking in and camping here. Talked to a couple of campers who said they had nightime sounds that they couldn't identify. Sounds like something to investigate!

 

Also saw Salt Creek Falls, second highest in the state. Wow!

 

IMG_20210717_213721_479.jpg

 

Mark on a rock.

IMG_20210717_213809_657.jpg

 

Waldo Lake, OR

20210717_111129.jpg

 

Salt Creek Falls, OR - 286 feet!

20210717_144840.jpg

Edited by Madison5716
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