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Searching For Bigfoot in Oregon


Madison5716
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As far as scenery and diversity in topography, such as coastal beaches, temperate rain forests, dunes, vast fertile valleys teaming with agricultural endeavors with farms producing grains, berries, orchards, vineyards, cattle, sheep and such, the Cascade Mountain range with dormant volcanos, high desert sagebrush flats, mountainous pine forests and tons of lakes, rivers and waterfalls, Oregon has it all!

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6 hours ago, gigantor said:

 

Come clean Madison, which magazine did you lift the picture from?  :) 

 

HA! This is NORTHWIND's picture! He took this. I'm obviously out on the water :)

 

 

9 hours ago, MIB said:

My first thought when you said below Diamond Peak was Timpanogas ... if you haven't been there, y' .. gotta

 

I've heard of it and I'd like to! We tried last spring, but it was still snowed in and we were unable to get close to it. We should try again before it gets snowed in THIS year!

Edited by Madison5716
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3 hours ago, Doug said:

As far as scenery and diversity in topography, such as coastal beaches, temperate rain forests, dunes, vast fertile valleys teaming with agricultural endeavors with farms producing grains, berries, orchards, vineyards, cattle, sheep and such, the Cascade Mountain range with dormant volcanos, high desert sagebrush flats, mountainous pine forests and tons of lakes, rivers and waterfalls, Oregon has it all!

 

ABSOLUTELY! It's a gorgeous state - it's hard to take a bad picture. I LOVE living here. 

Edited by Madison5716
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Date & Time - Sunday,  September 5 to Monday,  September 6, departure at 10a onto the trail.

Weather  - idk, maybe 80? Perfect temp. Some smoke from fires, some blustery wind in late evening,  turning into a quiet night.

Location- halfway to Klamath Falls, lol, up in the Cascade Range

What Happened- NorthWind and I followed up on an experience report and I got to do my first backpacking trip overnighter! I've done tons of camping, lived in my van for six months, but never did this. Done! 

 

So, we hiked in to a small lake where some campers experienced supposed bigfoots around their tent in the night and some rock tumbling. 

 

We had a quiet night. No visitors, but i haven't listened to my audio. 

 

However, in the morning, fortunately after coffee and breakfast, we got activity. NorthWind had set up a recording of a baby crying, and they showed up in the morning, perturbed apparently. We got seven clear wood knocks across the lake from us as we took down camp. The seventh, which i don't think we got recorded :( ) was the loudest I've EVER heard. It was if I'd smacked a baseball bat as hard as possible against a tree. It echoed around the lake, and if a wood knock could sound absolutely pissed off at us and our crying baby, it did. We packed up and grabbed the recorder, and split. We got an eighth wood knock when we were out of the bottle neck, out on the exit trail - obviously they followed us, typically escorting behavior. They wanted nothing to do with us! They wanted us gone. 

 

I didn't record much because NorthWind is working on a video and his are better than mine.

 

Cool experience! Our camp, below:

 

20210905_154151.jpg

 

The lake at sunrise. And no smoke on day 2, hooray!

 

20210906_091704.jpg

 

I solved that "no good instant coffee" issue. Works great!

 

20210906_071455.jpg

 

The recorder is to the left at one point on a triangle, the knocks were the other point, and our camp was the final point. 

 

20210906_070056.jpg

Edited by Madison5716
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Here's the preview video. NorthWind is doing the actual video.

 

 

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3 hours ago, Madison5716 said:

NorthWind had set up a recording of a baby crying,

 

 

 

Thanks for your report and photos!

 

On the crying baby sound, how did you go about it?  Was it on a speaker sound system?, where did you get the recording?, what instrument was used to play the sound?, what direction was the sound projected towards and how long was the sound played?

 

I am curious about this because (according to a research colleague from Northern CA) it was after a prolonged and annoying real baby crying that a BF showed up in his camp. 

 

 

Edited by Explorer
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NorthWind will have to answer your question, IDK. 

 

Also, NO FISH. 

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3 hours ago, Madison5716 said:

Date & Time - Sunday,  September 5 to Monday,  September 6, departure at 10a onto the trail.

Weather  - idk, maybe 80? Perfect temp. Some smoke from fires, some blustery wind in late evening,  turning into a quiet night.

Location- halfway to Klamath Falls, lol, up in the Cascade Range

What Happened- NorthWind and I followed up on an experience report and I got to do my first backpacking trip overnighter! I've done tons of camping, lived in my van for six months, but never did this. Done! 

 

So, we hiked in to a small lake where some campers experienced supposed bigfoots around their tent in the night and some rock tumbling. 

 

We had a quiet night. No visitors, but i haven't listened to my audio. 

 

However, in the morning, fortunately after coffee and breakfast, we got activity. NorthWind had set up a recording of a baby crying, and they showed up in the morning, perturbed apparently. We got seven clear wood knocks across the lake from us as we took down camp. The seventh, which i don't think we got recorded :( ) was the loudest I've EVER heard. It was if I'd smacked a baseball bat as hard as possible against a tree. It echoed around the lake, and if a wood knock could sound absolutely pissed off at us and our crying baby, it did. We packed up and grabbed the recorder, and split. We got an eighth wood knock when we were out of the bottle neck, out on the exit trail - obviously they followed us, typically escorting behavior. They wanted nothing to do with us! They wanted us gone. 

 

I didn't record much because NorthWind is working on a video and his are better than mine.

 

Cool experience! Our camp, below:

 

20210905_154151.jpg

 

The lake at sunrise. And no smoke on day 2, hooray!

 

20210906_091704.jpg

 

I solved that "no good instant coffee" issue. Works great!

 

20210906_071455.jpg

 

The recorder is to the left at one point on a triangle, the knocks were the other point, and our camp was the final point. 

 

20210906_070056.jpg

 

Congraulations on your backpacking maiden voyage.  That is very exciting about the woods knocks. That's more than I've heard in my lifetime!  The baby crying....isn't it interesting what sets them off?

 

Do you two have plans to return there? I'd be back in a NY minute. 

 

How was the hike into your location?

 

 

Edited by wiiawiwb
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@wiiawiwbHonestly, I hate this lake. It's a B*TCH to hike in to; takes 3 hours at our snails pace. It's UP and DOWN, UP and DOWN for four miles, at high altitude. It's MISERABLE. I was glad for the forest fire smoke - no mosquitoes - last time we were eaten alive. Getting to this campsite literally takes 5+ hours. 

 

And since we obviously pissed them off this time, I'm reluctant to go with just the two of us again. I want a few more folks to go with us if we go back. Call me chicken, but there's no quick escape from this location.  The idea of finding prints on the other side of the lake is appealing, but the forest floor is not good for prints. It's all forest duff, just needles and stuff. I don't think we'd find anything.

 

Hey @MIB, watcha doing?

 

So, IDK if we'll be back. A friend of mine found 14 inch prints on a creek while they were fishing and kindly sent me a photo, so I kinda want to check them out next weekend. We'll see.

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16 minutes ago, Explorer said:

 

 

Thanks for your report and photos!

 

On the crying baby sound, how did you go about it?  Was it on a speaker sound system?, where did you get the recording?, what instrument was used to play the sound?, what direction was the sound projected towards and how long was the sound played?).

 

I am curious about this because (according to a research colleague from Northern CA) it was after a prolonged and annoying real baby crying  that a BF to showed up in his camp. 

 

 

I have a little (by standard definition, HUGE and HEAVY by backpacking standards) portable AM / FM/ SW/ Weather band hand crank radio with solar. It has a slot for an SD card, so I used that as a player. I edited together a little sound file before we left. Got 3 or 4 minutes of a baby crying from freesound.org and looped it over and over to make about two and a half to three hours of crying. I figured any critter out there would be interested in that sound. I preceded the crying with three hours of silence, and at the very beginning, ten chirps, one second apart so I could gauge volume and knew it would play when I hit play. Set a timer on my phone for three hours so I knew when it would begin. I set it out about 6:30 or 6:45 pm so it would be dark when the crying started. I thought it would just play once, but it played the whole shebang over and over.

 

I set this device near the scree field on the other side of the lake from us and camoflauged it a bit. I was hoping we would get some activity over there and be able to see it with the two FLIRs we have and the Sionyx. But there was just too much smoke in the air to see clearly, expecially with the Sionyx.

 

I also set up a secondary audio player. Bluetooth, this time, and used my emergency shelter as a "tent". The idea was to play a looped snoring file in that shelter from my phone in camp. A "decoy tent". After dark, I realized it was too far away and couldn't pair up, and I didn't feel like wandering into the dark woods to correct it (move it closer).

 

BTW, the little emergency shelter is wonderful. It is the T6Zero shelter from Coalcracker Bushcraft and can set up ready to go in less than 60 seconds. Only weighs 6 ounces, and can pack down to about the size of a baseball. https://coalcrackerbushcraft.com/products/t6zero-emergency-shelter-system There's no excuse not to have shelter out of the trail if things go sideways.

 

We hung up our food in a tree, as we didn't want any ursine visitors.

 

I haven't backpacked in for an overnighter or longer in years. I know a lot from my earlier days, but everytime I go into the woods I learn something. This time was no exception. I explain in my video that I still have to edit together. It was an important lesson, and I will never do what I did again.

 

 

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3 hours ago, Madison5716 said:

Hey @MIB, watcha doing?

 

You mean other than sitting here intrigued?  :):)   Wow.   Wish I'd been there.   Wish I knew what my sched looked like the next few weekends so I could at least offer to meet up 'n' go with you!!  

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I was kinda thinking that direction. Who else is in Oregon? I don't know if we have any plans to return, but I'm turning it over in my mind. It's a miserable hike. Might as well make it fun!

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17 minutes ago, Madison5716 said:

It's a miserable hike. 

 

Says the person with the little 22lb pack.  But since it's only been a year since your surgery, I guess you're off the hook.

 

Like your fish!   :rofl:

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