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Where Are The Sasquatches In The OP??

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Huntster
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32 minutes ago, Twist said:

 

How many bears have you killed or shot at in such a matter?........

 

None, but I've had a couple of times I came close to shooting. A few other times I unslung the rifle just because, and they know what that means.

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Doug
8 hours ago, SWWASAS said:

NCBFr and Doug that is very interesting.   I have to admit I do the reverse with animals, especially deer.     When I see one I marvel at how pretty they are and try to exude admiration and friendship.          When I do that, they stare at me a few seconds,  then go back to eating.    Often I can walk to within 15 or 20 feet of them.   Somehow they seem to pick up on the fact I mean them no harm.    I have wondered how often BF has watched this happen.    If an animal can pick up on that sort of thing,   perhaps we can pick up the fear in them when they fear for their lives because we are too close.     I have a house with the entire backside open with windows and glass doors.      Very often, several times a week,  a bird with run into a window and stun themselves.     Sometimes it knocks them out.    Only once or twice have they died.    But often, they might be there gasping for air on their side or sitting strangely.     I have thought about warming them or something in very cold weather because they are likely in shock.   But I think me just approaching and touching them might literally scare them to death.    The last one was out there about 4 hours before it recovered enough to fly off.     It was tipped over face down for a while, on its side,  then back on its feet with head down,   then sitting more normally. before it flew off.    I would approach the door watch it and send comforting thoughts.   I wonder if it got any of that.  Darkness was approaching and I kept sending a mental message that it needed to get to safety in it's nesting area before dark or it would freeze to death.    Sure enough, just before dark it was gone.  I hate to bury things.          

 

I too, usually have some birds and animals become very relaxed in my presents at close range. Especially deer. I think they can read body language especially if the have seen humans on a regular basis, however, I have had a lot of close relaxed interactions with critters in national forests where they may have never seen a human and are curious rather than fearful. I have seen some really bizarre and unexpected reactions from critters. 

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NatFoot
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6 hours ago, Huntster said:

 

No. Most of my close bear observations have been when the bear came to my bait, which means that it was a controlled setting and I was either up in a tree, or on the ground some distance away. I learned early not to bait bears and be in a ground blind close to the bait, especially at night (that was my first year going with a friend to his bait site........very dangerous, but quite exciting.........)

 

If I have a surprise bear encounter on the ground at close range (like under 75 yards), I get into position to simply shoot him, and enjoy the encounter. Depending on his species and size, I might remain quiet, and I might begin moving away. 

 

 

 

Yup. Bears are wrestlers. This bear mauling/killing is the (unfortunately) perfect example of what they'll do. Note the bears wide rear foot stance. They use their weight to pin their opponents down, which is how they tend to fight other bears, and overpower ungulate calves and other prey like adult caribou.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Good. You probably spoke good body language, too. Watch out for mature boars. If he tests you, he's a potential killer. You'll know it......

 

 

 

Bucks in rut can be dangerous! Usually shy bull moose become potential killers when in rut, too. 

 

Wow. How did that bear kill him? That happened very fast. Did he claw his throat or bite it?

 

Seems very unlucky compared to those who are severely mauled and survive.

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NCBFr
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8 hours ago, SWWASAS said:

Deer kill more people in this country every year than nearly all the rest of the animals put together.   

 

I will try to do my deer story but will never do it justice.  I had a husky catch a baby deer in my back yard many years ago.  I ran out and saved the deer which was alive but down.  The husky was circling me and the deer to try and finish the job.  Momma deer comes flying out, gets on hind legs and starts attacking me and my husky with her front hooves.  We basically had 4 concentric circles going around with the baby down in the middle.  The husky easily evades the attack and tries to press in and get the baby.  I dance around mom evading blows while trying to catch my dog and get the baby free.  After two minutes of this baby gets up, and runs off while I block my dog.  Momma finally gets down and runs off as well.  Damn huskies. More than once they have almost killed me.

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Huntster
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26 minutes ago, NatFoot said:

Wow. How did that bear kill him? That happened very fast. Did he claw his throat or bite it?......

 

Yup. One of his arteries in his neck was severed. He died within a half hour.

 

........

Seems very unlucky compared to those who are severely mauled and survive.

 

Very true. I knew a guy many years ago who was mauled by a grizzly.The bear bit him in the face, lower jaw under the Ron's jaw, and his upper teeth over the top of his head. It quite literally crushe the side of his head. He survived, bit was horribly disfigured for the rest of his life. He was fearful looking! Spooked almost everybody out........but not quite wverybody, because  ith he and his gorgeous wife were murdered several years after the mauling. The mursers were never solved. Drug related.

 

This guy got his face destroyed. Blinded him for life:

 

https://www.ktuu.com/content/news/A-man-attacked-by-a-brown-bear-describes-the-attack-on-his-life--386872171.html

 

39 minutes ago, NCBFr said:

........Damn huskies. More than once they have almost killed me.

 

Good story! I'll bet your huskies love to run off, too, don't they? There is 't a husky on Earth that understands the "come" command.

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Twist
9 hours ago, Huntster said:

 

None, but I've had a couple of times I came close to shooting. A few other times I unslung the rifle just because, and they know what that means.

 

Must be some hair raising experiences!

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NCBFr
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9 hours ago, Huntster said:

Good story! I'll bet your huskies love to run off, too, don't they? There is 't a husky on Earth that understands the "come" command.

 

I actually had one.  A female called Tiramisu.  I could take her on hikes off leash.  I could hear her crashing around the woods all around but could never see her until I whistled after which she would always come to my side within a minute.  Great dog.  However, you are right, she was the rare one.  I have spent hours chasing them all across the county to the point at 53 I am done with them and have moved on to Shepherds.  I had one husky I gave up on until I got a call from Dominoes pizza after he had been gone for over an hour.  Evidently he got hungry and jumped in a delivery car a couple miles from my house.  

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Huntster
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1 hour ago, Twist said:

Must be some hair raising experiences!

 

Afterwards. When surprise encounters occur, they happen fast. But sometimes, close encounters can be fun.......like the time I had a young grizzly try to run me off from a pool in the Talachulitna River that was full of salmon. He put on quite a performance, but I had enough distance and saw his frustrated uncertainty not to get too concerned. Finally, as his performance continued, I decided that it might be wise to put my fishing rod down and unsling my rifle, and upon doing so, I may as well hit him with lightning. His performance ended immediately, and his facial expression was golden. I could almost hear his mind say to himself, "Oh, s**t!" He turned, disappeared into the brush, and I never saw him again.

 

They definitely know what a rifle is. They know what it means when you rack the bolt, too. That metallic sound has a miraculously and universally understood meaning.......

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Huntster
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33 minutes ago, NCBFr said:

.........I had one husky I gave up on until I got a call from Dominoes pizza after he had been gone for over an hour.  Evidently he got hungry and jumped in a delivery car a couple miles from my house.  

 

There's another common trait of theirs: whoring. They're all love for a good meal, then they're off again until their tummy tells them that running needs to take a back seat to food.

 

Just before I met Mrs. Huntster they had a gorgeous husky that showed up and adopted them. In those days fences in Alaska only existed on the military bases. There were dog packs everywhere, including Anchorage, but especially out in the Valley. These packs always consisted of at least one husky, and were commonly led by labs, those two breeds being the unofficial dog breeds of territorial and post-statehood Alaska. They were everywhere. One didn't go get a dog. They showed up and adopted you. If the food was good and regular, and especially if you let them inside during winter, they "hung out". This particularly gorgeous specimen ended up hit by a car just a few months before I met her.

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NCBFr
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Yep, you know the breed well.

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