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RedHawk454

How dangerous is it to be BiGFooting alone?

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w00kie
On 12/25/2018 at 1:28 PM, MindSquatch said:

Learned a great tip from this video on how to get some dry firewood with a knife by making a draw knife. In the past when camping in wet conditions and needed some dry firewood, I would go to where the cliffs or boulders are and usually will find dry wood where it is protected from moisture. 

https://youtu.be/LNKTSa7OK_0

 

That’s a cool tip with the knife. I carry a kukri machete. The inside edge works as a draw knife and the top is squared so it can shave as well. 

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MagniAesir
On 12/25/2018 at 12:43 AM, Catmandoo said:

^^^^^ Yes. Being dry is critical. I watched both videos. Good information. I am in the PNW.  I am not around dense stands of deciduous trees. I am around thin layers of wet, decaying leaves. The 'long fire' looks nice. The persons in the videos had 'fat wood'. We don't have that except in the stores for kindling.  Fat wood is loaded with pitch and is easy to light, burns hot and fast.  The firewood in the videos looked dry. The ground was dry. The leaves were dry.  No snow. All the actors were wearing coffee cups. And that bacon?  No thank you, I don't want to invite a bear into an emergency shelter unless of course the bear is having a bacon emergency.  A You Tube presentation with everything being soaking wet would be helpful.

 

Hypothermia and the wind chill factor. We know that wind chill factor does not record on a thermometer. It is basic. Moisture evaporating from skin in cold wind is a calculated wind chill factor.  Prevent/minimize  moisture evaporating from your skin and you will be a lot happier. 

 

There is a survival outfit in Colorado.   Wilderness Survival Institute, also known as "WISE". They used to sell  survival supplies but their website "store/shopping cart" seems to be having problems. The person who started that organization was nicknamed "Papa Bear".

Just wondering where in the PNW would you not have fatwood?

 

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Catmandoo
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^^^^^ My understanding is that "fatwood" is a pine like tree in the South Eastern US that has a very high pitch content. Burns hot and fast.   PNW has pitch loaded trees, but I don't think that they burn like southern fatwood. I have a package of 'fatwood' that I bought for fire starters during camping. I will check the labeling for the source.

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norseman
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MagniAesir

I live in the Fraser Valley and can tell you that fatwood is very common in southwestern British Columbia and Vancouver Island.

 

I live in the Fraser Valley and can tell you that fatwood is very common in southwestern British Columbia and Vancouver Island.

 

 

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MagniAesir

 

Go you minute 16 to see fatwood being gathered

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NorthWind
On 12/25/2018 at 7:18 AM, Huntster said:

I was with a party of folks once who had snowmobiled just 8 miles in to a lake for ice fishing. There was a little girl with us of about 7 years of age. It was a steady -30 degrees. At one point, her complaining about the cold prompted us to start a fire. But the tinder and dead wood in the area wouldn’t light! I decided that it must have been a very wet fall, the wood had been soaked, then it froze with all that moisture in it. Repeatedly pouring gas on it didn’t even work. Trioxine bars didn’t work. In the end, cotton balls soaked in Vasoline petroleum jelly got a small fire going, and it took some time, but we got a larger fire going. 

 

I was also also on a solo moose hunt where it rained steadily for the entire season. I had flipped my canoe, and gotten everything wet. Same thing; I couldn’t get a decent fire going to dry things out.

 

The fuel can can be so soaked, it won’t burn.

 

I am just reading this thread, so my apologies if I am a little late.

 

In addition to the vaseline soaked cotton balls, I always carry a road flare or two along with me. They are light, packable, and they will burn even underwater, and give you enough time to light anything. And they can be used for signalling, or as a critter repellent if needed. 

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NathanFooter

 I usually end up on my own ( not by my own choice, people seem to be flaky about cold and wet :unsure: ) with the exception of my 357 being at my side. I am always looking to work with others out this way but it seems pretty empty of folks who want to work as a group or commit the level of time that I do.

 

 It can be very dangerous and go very wrong very fast.  Cougar populations are on the rise and in knowing that I always like to either be on the high ground or watch any rise I may be passing by. You should evaluate every location you move through from a predatory mindset and avoid ledges or rock outcroppings near pinch points. I am not so worried about bears, they seem to lift feet when people come bush battling through. I also entirely avoid red or pink colored accents on my clothing.

 

 I also always carry a small med kit, compass, strong blade, multi-tool, 100 feet of paracord, 2 mylar blankets, pocket survival guide, painters drop cloth ( great shelter waterproofing ), gorilla tape, fishing kit, 6 fire starters, a flint striker, lighter headlamp, spare batteries, water filter, 2500 extra in carb calories and a good sized bag of common sense.   If you have these things and know how to use them then you can make it back to civilization almost every time.

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Catmandoo
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22 hours ago, MagniAesir said:

I live in the Fraser Valley and can tell you that fatwood is very common in southwestern British Columbia and Vancouver Island.

 

I checked my package of store bought fatwood. I bought it on a whim because I associated it with  Longleaf Pine lumber from the SE US, not the resin rich stump material. I just read the package. Georgia company and the wood is from Mexico. Years ago, I read an article or talked with a 'southerner' about fatwood..  Many years ago, before clearcutting reduced/eliminated the supply of Longleaf Pine for building lumber, homes were built with 'fatwood' pine lumber.  If these homes caught fire, it was a disaster. And now, since Longleaf Pine is endangered, we harvest stumps in 3rd world countries for fire starters or find it in local forests.  I have never looked for it. I tend to find stumps with rotted out heartwood.  Campfires in Washington State may have restrictions due to last years wildfires. Gathering local fatwood might have a limited short term future. I may have to gather propane and butane. At times, campfires were limited to designated campgrounds. Forest service personnel would make their rounds and remove fuel from rogue fire rings. Seems extreme but it is to prevent forest fires.

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norseman
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I like Cedar as fire starter and I like the smell.

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RedHawk454

I don't think i'll be able to make it out to PNW this early Summer, Maybe August.

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wiiawiwb

Now that Spring is here, I hope everyone is starting to get out and explore the woods.  I've been out a few times already; one to retrieve a trail cam. Much to my chagrin, it was unceremoniously removed by an unknown third party.  It's replacement is on it's way and back out it goes to hopefully provide more information about what is routinely coming through the area and when.

 

I'm looking forward to a productive Spring and am mindful to put myself out in situations where something might approach.  There is one place in particular I go that has had sightings/encounters that I will do overnights with a friend. This place is very spooky/creepy and wildlife noises are always absent at night.  It is also a place where a person has gone missing without a trace. It is the only place I go that I have not gone alone but always willing to go with a buddy.  I've never had a good feeling going there and have never been reluctant to go alone before to any place. The irony is it the best place to trigger a sighting/encounter but there's something not quite right there.

 

My instinct tells me to buddy up but I may thrown caution to the wind one of these nights. I keep telling myself that if I use a perimeter security system (keychain alarm and fishing line) and have my thermal at the ready,  I should be fine.  We'll see.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by wiiawiwb
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Catmandoo
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38 minutes ago, wiiawiwb said:

It is the only place I go that I have not gone alone but always willing to go with a buddy.  I've never had a good feeling going there and have never been reluctant to go alone before to any place. The irony is it the best place to trigger a sighting/encounter but there's something not quite right there.

 

Spooky stuff. What is your animal inventory at this location?  Does this area lack bears, deer, coyotes, ravens etc.? That would be a good  scenario for you in that possible false positives for your thermal equipment would be reduced.

Years ago, I encountered a camper by an area that I visit. He immediately said that there was something wrong with this part of the forest. He said that there weren't any animals. He was partially correct. There are large elusive types. Deer avoid this area.. I feel that keeping track of the seasonal animal inventory is important.

 

I do not have a perimeter alarm set up but have 'close-in' alarms . I have cow bells. Batteries  not required and they are weather proof. The sound is pleasant.

 

Stay safe.

Edited by Catmandoo
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SWWASAS
45 minutes ago, wiiawiwb said:

Now that Spring is here, I hope everyone is starting to get out and explore the woods.  I've been out a few times already; one to retrieve a trail cam. Much to my chagrin, it was unceremoniously removed by an unknown third party.  It's replacement is on it's way and back out it goes to hopefully provide more information about what is routinely coming through the area and when.

 

I'm looking forward to a productive Spring and am mindful to put myself out in situations where something might approach.  There is one place in particular I go that has had sightings/encounters that I will do overnights with a friend. This place is very spooky/creepy and wildlife noises are always absent at night.  It is also a place where a person has gone missing without a trace. It is the only place I go that I have not gone alone but always willing to go with a buddy.  I've never had a good feeling going there and have never been reluctant to go alone before to any place. The irony is it the best place to trigger a sighting/encounter but there's something not quite right there.

 

My instinct tells me to buddy up but I may thrown caution to the wind one of these nights. I keep telling myself that if I use a perimeter security system (keychain alarm and fishing line) and have my thermal at the ready,  I should be fine.  We'll see.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I would trust your instincts.    When I don’t I am sorry.    I have a perimeter alarm around my country house.   Sensitive IR sensors that are battery powered.   Birds and rabbits will set it off.   Have an outer zone that I have selected a dog barking.   If someone gets near the house  “Coming around the Mountain” tells me they are near the house.   It can have 4 zones which would cover 360 degrees around.  Nothing  sneaks up on me.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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hiflier
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^^ Like that. Hi, Catmandoo. Yeah the cowbells do work. I have two that I attach to a full unbroken circle of good thread at a diameter of about 100'. There is a section that I leave open for going and going which I close off at night. I usually keep the thread about 24" to 30" high so small animals don't trigger the bells. But with only two I think I need more cowbell. I also hang a couple of $15 motion lights in strategic places along with a trail camera watching the camp. I do get faked out by a couple of BF's who don straw hats, canes, red and white striped coats and do a vaudeville dance routine when the lights go on just to throw me off. I seem to fall for that trick every dang time. Must be my age ;) 

Edited by hiflier

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