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HOLDMYBEER

INTERVIEWS OF FRANK ISHIHARA

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HOLDMYBEER

Just some clarification based on my work with Frank,  those of you who have hands-on experience can confirm or deny... original Kodachrome was K-11 process and in 16mm was phased out about 1961. It was replaced by Kodachrome II requiring K-12 process. It is my understanding from Frank that K-12 process for 35mm is the same as K-12 process for 16mm. The same machine does the job but the mechanical details of film transport are adjusted for the respective films.

Edited by HOLDMYBEER

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OldMort
3 hours ago, HOLDMYBEER said:

It is my understanding from Frank that K-12 process for 35mm is the same as K-12 process for 16mm. The same machine does the job but the mechanical details of film transport are adjusted for the respective films.

 

^^^ Correct.

 

As far as the K-11 process, it appears that Dynacolor still used that process for several years after it's phase-out around '61 and '62.

 

They had formulated their own film called Dynachrome which required K-11 processing and acquired a licensing agreement with Kodak to do so.

 

Eventually they acquired the K-12 process as well. Its hard to know exactly when Dynacolor ceased all K-11 processing or how long the overlap period was.

 

Which brings us back to Sawyer's in Portand, Oregon.

 

From Wiki;  Sawyer's, Inc. was an American manufacturer and retailer of slide projectors, scenic slides, View-Master reels and viewers, postcards, and related products, based in Portland, Oregon. Founded in 1914 as a photo-finishing company, Sawyer's began producing and selling View-Masters in 1939, and that soon became its primary product. It later diversified into other photographic products, mostly related to film transparencies, and established manufacturing plants in Europe, Japan and India.

 

Here's what a view-master was/is: View-Master was first introduced at the New York World's Fair in 1939. Intended as an alternative to the postcard with 7 3D Kodachrome images, it was originally marketed through photo shops, stationary stores and scenic attraction gift shops. The View-Master system was invented by William Gruber, an organ maker and avid photographer who lived in Portland, Oregon. He had the idea to use the old idea of the stereoscope and update it with the new Kodachrome color film that had just hit the market. A chance meeting with Harold Graves, the president of Sawyer's, Inc. (a company that specialized in picture post cards) got the idea off the ground and quickly took over the postcard business at Sawyer's. 

 

Toronto_view-master.thumb.jpg.22c99e8fcf98894e99727a27d94e16ca.jpg

 

In 1966, Sawyer's was acquired by New York-based (GAF), and its product lines and facilities were taken over by GAF. It was a subsidiary company of GAF until 1968, when it became simply a division of that company, renamed the GAF Consumer Photo Division. It was at this time also (1966) that Sawyer's ceased its Kodachrome and K-11 processing line and instead went with Ektachrome and similar films which required the E-6 process.

 

It appears that 35mm Kodachrome film could be sent to Sawyer's for processing during the time up until 1966 when the K-11 process was no longer available there.

 

If this information is indeed accurate, I think we can safely cross Sawyer's off the list.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Catmandoo
BFF Donor
15 hours ago, PBeaton said:

Catmandoo,

 

 

You mention you have Kodachrome that was processed, this might be a silly question, but can you confirm it is actually Kodachrome ll which requires K12 processin'.

 

Pat...

 

Yes. Kodachrome  II. Kodachrome II goes back a ways in time. I am not able to determine the processing chemistry on the Kodachrome II  that I have that were developed by TALLS in 1963, 1964 and 1967.  I expect to have a time table on Kodak chemistries in a week.

 

Technicolor had 10 labs in the US in 1967.  West coast had Hollywood, San Francisco, Sacramento, Fresno and Seattle.

 

I went to the great depository of really old, bad and expired films..........ebay.   I found 16mm Kodachrome II,   process before 1961 with a K-11 processing.   I found 2 films, Kodachrome II,  process before May & Oct. 1965 with K-12 processing.

 

Please make a determination between the film and processing. "KII' looks short for the film  Kodachrome II as compared to "K-11", the processing chemicals.

Kodachrome II.

K-11 & K-12. The last soup was K-14.

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OldMort

As I said before, there's probably a lengthy overlap of product and process during the phase out period. Here's a general chart.

Product timeline

Film Date
Kodachrome film 16 mm, daylight (ASA 10) & Type A (ASA 16) 1935–1962
8 mm, daylight (ASA 10) & Type A (ASA 16) 1936–1962
35 mm and 828, daylight & Type A 1936–1962
Kodachrome Professional film (sheets) daylight (ASA 8) and Type B (ASA 10) 1938–1951
K-11 process
Kodachrome film 35 mm and 828, Type F (ASA 12) 1955–1962
Kodachrome Professional film 35 mm, Type A (ASA 16) 1956–1962
Kodak Color Print Material Type D (slide duping film) 1955–1957
K-12 process
Kodachrome II film 16 mm, daylight (ASA 25) and Type A (ASA 40) 1961–1974
8 mm, daylight (ASA 25) and Type A (ASA 40) 1961–1974
S-8, Type A (ASA 40) 1965–1974
35 mm and 828, daylight (ASA 25/early) (ASA 64/late) 1961–1974
Professional, 35 mm, Type A (ASA 40) 1962–1978
Kodachrome-X film 35 mm (ASA 64) 1962–1974
126 format 1963–1974
110 format 1972–1974
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