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BlackRockBigfoot

Mysterious Animal Attack Leads To Death

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Doug

When I was a little kid at my parents house we spent all of our time in the woods behind their house. Then the ban on hound hunting and bear bating happened. Cougar and bear numbers went way up. Since the ban, there has always been cougars on his property. None of my brother's or my kids were allowed outside unless an adult was within 5 ft of them and armed and carrying a tag. I took up residence with a cougar 24 years ago and she's ornery as heck, but, sometimes I can get her to purr. She's only 8 years younger than my mom and I am three years older than my oldest step daughter.

 

Side note; the last cougar kill I was involved with, we butchered it and made backstrap steaks and had sausage and pepperoni made from the rest. HANDS DOWN, the BEST meat I have ever eaten!

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Huntster
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14 hours ago, Doug said:

.........the last cougar kill I was involved with, we butchered it and made backstrap steaks and had sausage and pepperoni made from the rest. HANDS DOWN, the BEST meat I have ever eaten!

 

It is not widely known that cat meat is about as good as it gets. It is always very tender, and the flavor is great. Cats are built differently than other carnivores, and that is why they're such great jumpers. I haven't eaten lion or domestic cat (that I've known of, anyway), but I've eaten lynx more than once, and it's great.

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norseman
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The ole mountain men prefered Cougar over Venison backstrap!

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Huntster
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Maybe that's why lions ate so elusive? They're freaking delicious?

 

I wonder how sauted sasquatch tastes?............

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norseman
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Chinese say humans taste like two legged pork...... 

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Huntster
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I've heard that. I've got pork ribs in the oven now, and ready to broil to crisp up the outside. I'll put my imagination to work.........

 

Edited to add: 

 

My brother shot a javalina yesterday. It's a peccary and not a true pig, but I suppose that's like the difference between eating a sapien or a sasquatch, huh? I don't think that peccary is as good as pork, even wild pig. 

Edited by Huntster

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norseman
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Never had it. But would like to do the Texas Helo Hog hunt.

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Twist
12 minutes ago, Huntster said:

I've heard that. I've got pork ribs in the oven now, and ready to broil to crisp up the outside. I'll put my imagination to work.........

 

Edited to add: 

 

My brother shot a javalina yesterday. It's a peccary and not a true pig, but I suppose that's like the difference between eating a sapien or a sasquatch, huh? I don't think that peccary is as good as pork, even wild pig. 

 

Grew up around pigs, never heard of a peccary, just spent a few minutes reading about them on wiki.  Kinda interesting little buggers.  

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norseman
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North America's version of a Hog.

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Huntster
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Peccary/Pig..........Six of one, half dozen the other, AFAIC.

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norseman
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https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peccary

 

A peccary is a medium-sized animal, with a strong resemblance to a pig. Like a pig, it has a snout ending in a cartilaginous disc, and eyes that are small relative to its head. Also like a pig, it uses only the middle two digits for walking, although, unlike pigs, the other toes may be altogether absent. Its stomach is not ruminating, although it has three chambers, and is more complex than those of pigs.[7]

Peccaries are omnivores, and will eat insects, grubs, and occasionally small animals, although their preferred foods consist of rootsgrassesseedsfruit,[7]and cacti—particularly prickly pear.[8]Pigs and peccaries can be differentiated by the shape of the canine tooth, or tusk. In European pigs, the tusk is long and curves around on itself, whereas in peccaries, the tusk is short and straight. The jaws and tusks of peccaries are adapted for crushing hard seeds and slicing into plant roots,[7] and they also use their tusks for defending against predators. The dental formula for peccaries is: 2.1.3.33.1.3.3

By rubbing the tusks together, they can make a chattering noise that warns potential predators to stay away. In recent years in northwestern Bolivianear Madidi National Park, large groups of peccaries have been reported to have seriously injured or killed people.[9]

Peccaries are social animals, and often form herds. Over 100 individuals have been recorded for a single herd of white-lipped peccaries, but collared and Chacoan peccaries usually form smaller groups. Such social behavior seems to have been the situation in extinctpeccaries, as well. The recently discovered giant peccary (Pecari maximus) of Brazil appears to be less social, primarily living in pairs.[10]Peccaries rely on their social structure to defend territory, protect against predators, regulate temperature, and interact socially.[11]

Peccaries have scent glands below each eye and another on their backs, though these are believed to be rudimentary in P. maximus. They use the scent to mark herd territories, which range from 75 to 700 acres (2.8 km2). They also mark other herd members with these scent glands by rubbing one against another. The pungent odor allows peccaries to recognize other members of their herd, despite their myopic vision. The odor is strong enough to be detected by humans, which earns the peccary the nickname of "skunk pig".

 

 

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Huntster
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1 hour ago, norseman said:

........They use the scent to mark herd territories, which range from 75 to 700 acres...........

 

Once you dial in the herds range, they're easier to hunt. My brother hunts dove, quail, rabbit, and javalina around a huge Arizona farm. The farm, irrigated, offers both water and food for the birds and javalina, and it attracts coyotes, too (he nailed a couple coyotes during the hunt as well). The farm manager, who my brother gotbto know from years of dove, rabbit, and quail hunting, urged him to apply for the javalina tags for the area because the javalina damage crops and fields. This is his third consecutive year of bagging the javalina there. He has a good gig going.........

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norseman
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Nice!

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NatFoot
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That's a pretty big coyote. Sounds like a lot of fun.

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Huntster
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Lots of coyote, javalina, bobcat, dove, quail, and rabbit in the area. I love going out there for the last week of dove season in early January, but I haven't geen able to go for the last couple of years due to my Mom's increasing assistance needs and Mrs. Huntsters increasing demands for my time chauffering her around. 

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